2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

381 - 390 of 461 results for: LAW

LAW 7073: Law, Bias, and Algorithms

Human decision making is increasingly being displaced by algorithms. Judges sentence defendants based on "risk scores;" regulators take enforcement actions based on predicted violations; advertisers target materials based on demographic attributes; and employers evaluate applicants and employees based on machine-learned models. A predominant concern with the rise of such algorithmic decision making (machine learning or artificial intelligence) is that it may replicate or exacerbate human bias. Algorithms might discriminate, for instance, based on race or gender. This course surveys the legal principles for assessing bias of algorithms, the engineering techniques for how to design and assess bias of algorithms, and assesses how antidiscrimination law and the design of algorithms may need to evolve to account for the potential emergence of machine bias. The course will meet jointly with MS&E 330 [ https://explorecourses.stanford.edu/search?view=catalog&filter-coursestatus-Active=on&page= more »
Human decision making is increasingly being displaced by algorithms. Judges sentence defendants based on "risk scores;" regulators take enforcement actions based on predicted violations; advertisers target materials based on demographic attributes; and employers evaluate applicants and employees based on machine-learned models. A predominant concern with the rise of such algorithmic decision making (machine learning or artificial intelligence) is that it may replicate or exacerbate human bias. Algorithms might discriminate, for instance, based on race or gender. This course surveys the legal principles for assessing bias of algorithms, the engineering techniques for how to design and assess bias of algorithms, and assesses how antidiscrimination law and the design of algorithms may need to evolve to account for the potential emergence of machine bias. The course will meet jointly with MS&E 330 [ https://explorecourses.stanford.edu/search?view=catalog&filter-coursestatus-Active=on&page=0&catalog=∾ademicYear=&q=MS%26E+330%3A+Law%2C+Bias%2C+%26+Algorithms+%29&collapse=]. Minimal coding background is assumed, but students will learn through interactive coding sessions in class. Admission is by consent of instructor and is limited to 20 students. Student assessment is based on response papers and a final project. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Spring 2019

LAW 7075: Families and Inequality I

Intimate sexual relationships are central to most people's lives. Marriage has long been the primary locus of such relationships, the foundation of family life. In recent decades, though, marriage has undergone unprecedented changes. Sustained political advocacy and judicial decisions have opened marriage to same sex couples. Yet marriage equality has triumphed at a time when marriage is less universal and less robust as a social institution than ever. More American adults than ever are unmarried; more than a third of those who do marry will divorce. Unprecendented numbers of children are now born to unmarried parents. And marriage rates and stability have diverged across racial and socioeconomic groupsas never before. What is one to make of these changes? And how should law and policy respond? The course will examine the constitutional and statutory doctrine governing marriage and other intimate relationships. Throughout, we will consider the cultural and social understandings that undergird our past and current approaches to regulating intimate relationships. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation and Exam.
Last offered: Spring 2018

LAW 7076: Race, Disadvantage, and Elite Education: the Allocation of Opportunity

In recent years, selective universities have become more academically selective than ever. During the past half century their applicant pools have grown considerably--now including women, minorities, immigrants, and international students--while the sizes of their student bodies remain virtually unchanged. The broader social and economic context has shifted as well. With globalization, the advance of technology and the resulting labor market shifts, advanced education is seen as more important than ever to getting ahead. Yet, even as elite universities seem central to Americans' hopes and dream, they have also come under attack, viewed as disconnected from, and alien to, "regular Americans." This course will engage these developments through considering a pivotal question: How do and should elite educational institutions choose among the many applicants vying for admission? Two principles loom large in the ethos of selective college admissions: diversity and merit. Throughout the cours more »
In recent years, selective universities have become more academically selective than ever. During the past half century their applicant pools have grown considerably--now including women, minorities, immigrants, and international students--while the sizes of their student bodies remain virtually unchanged. The broader social and economic context has shifted as well. With globalization, the advance of technology and the resulting labor market shifts, advanced education is seen as more important than ever to getting ahead. Yet, even as elite universities seem central to Americans' hopes and dream, they have also come under attack, viewed as disconnected from, and alien to, "regular Americans." This course will engage these developments through considering a pivotal question: How do and should elite educational institutions choose among the many applicants vying for admission? Two principles loom large in the ethos of selective college admissions: diversity and merit. Throughout the course, we will take a critical stance toward these claims. For example, how much does and should merit shape admissions decisions? What are the rationales for using prior grades and test scores to assess applicants? Similarly, what are the costs and benefit of the diversity rationale? Should schools take account of race, socioeconomic class, or neither? Course readings will include judicial opinions and legal commentary, social science evidence and cultural criticism. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Last offered: Spring 2018

LAW 7077: Native Peoples and the Law (Reading Group)

This reading group of five evening meetings over the quarter will explore Native peoples' encounters with U.S. law as recounted in novels, documentaries, essays, and other material, emphasizing indigenous perspectives and voices. The class is intended as a complement to LAW7030: Federal Indian Law; students enrolled in that course will receive priority in admission, but all students are welcome, space permitting. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Spring 2018

LAW 7078: The United States Senate as a Legal Institution

This course will familiarize students with major, and/or emerging legal and constitutional issues concerning the U.S. Senate. In so doing, it will examine: 1) the Senate's nature as a complex legal institution, and 2) the issue of the Senate's legitimacy in the context of the current and largely unprecedented criticism of the Senate from all parts of the political spectrum. This first portion of the course will consider institutional-legitimacy issues facing the Senate, including the appointment of senators to fill vacancies as well as disputes concerning Senate rules and procedures such as the filibuster and holds. The second part of the course will explore how the Senate interfaces with the Constitution and the Supreme Court. It will examine how senators should regard the issue of constitutionality in voting on legislation, be it campaign-finance reform, internet decency, or health care. This part of the course will also consider how senators should approach proposed constitutional a more »
This course will familiarize students with major, and/or emerging legal and constitutional issues concerning the U.S. Senate. In so doing, it will examine: 1) the Senate's nature as a complex legal institution, and 2) the issue of the Senate's legitimacy in the context of the current and largely unprecedented criticism of the Senate from all parts of the political spectrum. This first portion of the course will consider institutional-legitimacy issues facing the Senate, including the appointment of senators to fill vacancies as well as disputes concerning Senate rules and procedures such as the filibuster and holds. The second part of the course will explore how the Senate interfaces with the Constitution and the Supreme Court. It will examine how senators should regard the issue of constitutionality in voting on legislation, be it campaign-finance reform, internet decency, or health care. This part of the course will also consider how senators should approach proposed constitutional amendments. The final portion of the course will review the wide range of issues that have emerged in recent years regarding the constitutional relationship between the Senate and the Executive Branch, including the increasingly acrimonious issue of the standard to apply to executive appointments under the advice and consent power. Particular emphasis on this part of the course will be given to issues that have gained greater prominence since 9/11, including the relationship between enacted, constitutional legislation and the presidential assertion of Article II powers, as well as the Senate's abdication of its Article I war-declaration power. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer, with consent of the instructor, from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance; and final exam or final research paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Feingold, R. (PI)

LAW 7079: Advanced Immigration Policy Reform

This is a seminar for students with a foundation in immigration law based on prior coursework, clinical fieldwork, or academic study who want to engage in an examination of the administrative process to achieve immigration reform. The course will examine immigration initiatives of the current administration and the federal administrative decision-making process. The goal is to identify strategies and mechanisms for administrative reform in the future that would further the protections of non-citizens during a period of global hostility to migrants. One significant part of the course will be for each seminar student to participate in mapping the administrative and sub-regulatory changes to immigration policy adopted by the Trump administration and to analyze avenues for reform. The seminar will examine the federal administrative process and the role litigation for furthering reform from a theoretical, doctrinal, and practical perspective based on selected readings, guest speakers, and t more »
This is a seminar for students with a foundation in immigration law based on prior coursework, clinical fieldwork, or academic study who want to engage in an examination of the administrative process to achieve immigration reform. The course will examine immigration initiatives of the current administration and the federal administrative decision-making process. The goal is to identify strategies and mechanisms for administrative reform in the future that would further the protections of non-citizens during a period of global hostility to migrants. One significant part of the course will be for each seminar student to participate in mapping the administrative and sub-regulatory changes to immigration policy adopted by the Trump administration and to analyze avenues for reform. The seminar will examine the federal administrative process and the role litigation for furthering reform from a theoretical, doctrinal, and practical perspective based on selected readings, guest speakers, and the instructor's hands-on experience serving in the Obama administration as a senior immigration policy official in the Department of Homeland Security and prior role as the founder and director of the ACLU Immigrants' Rights Project. Requirements: A prior course in immigration law or supervised work in a clinical, professional, academic, or other setting. Elements used in grading: Grades will be based on class attendance, class participation, and either writing assignments (Section 01) or an independent research paper (Section 02). A limited number of students may be permitted to write the long research paper for R credit with the approval of the instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

LAW 7080: Amending the U.S. Constitution

This seminar explores the legal and historical dimensions of the American constitutional amendment process as well as its current and potential role in our political system and public debate. The principal focus will be on Article V of the Constiution but we will also briefly examine the way in which the Constitution is said by some to be "amendable" (and to have already been "amended") through alternate means apart from Article V. The seminar will enable students both critically to evaluate the myriad aspects of constitutional amendments and conventions using proper source material and to develop their own proposals for potential amendments. The first part of the course will first explore the origins of Article V, including background on the comparative amendability of other written constitutions, the adoption of the Bill of Rights, and the apparent unamendability of the provision in Article V requiring equal representation of the states in the Senate. We will then review the history more »
This seminar explores the legal and historical dimensions of the American constitutional amendment process as well as its current and potential role in our political system and public debate. The principal focus will be on Article V of the Constiution but we will also briefly examine the way in which the Constitution is said by some to be "amendable" (and to have already been "amended") through alternate means apart from Article V. The seminar will enable students both critically to evaluate the myriad aspects of constitutional amendments and conventions using proper source material and to develop their own proposals for potential amendments. The first part of the course will first explore the origins of Article V, including background on the comparative amendability of other written constitutions, the adoption of the Bill of Rights, and the apparent unamendability of the provision in Article V requiring equal representation of the states in the Senate. We will then review the history of efforts--both successful and unsuccessful--to amend the Constitution, such as the early corrective amendments to the post-Civil War Reconstruction amendments, the Progressive Era amendments (e.g., the switch to the direct election of Senators), and the modern voting-related amendments. This section will also consider views about when and how it is proper or "appropriate" to amend the Constitution, the standard that members of Congress should employ in voting on proposed amendments, and the history of calls for constitutional conventions to amend the Constitution. The second part of the course will explore the current possibility of a constitutional convention or conventions being called independently of Congressional initiative including the question of whether the scope of such a convention could be limited. We will then examine the relatively recent and current proposals and advocacy for and against constitutional amendments across the political spectrum. For this portion of the course, we will particularly consider the balanced budget amendment, the state veto amendment, the victims' rights amendment, and the elimination of the direct election of Senators, from the conservative side of that spectrum. We will then particularly highlight the movement to overturn Citizens United by amendment, the elimination of the electoral college amendment, the proposal to overturn Heller (right to bear arms) by amendment, and the current effort to revive and ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, all mostly associated with the progressive or liberal side of the spectrum. For the final seminar, students will be asked to give in class their opinion of Article V and whether it is too easy or difficult (or just right) in terms of allowing amendments. Each student will also be asked briefly to propose and defend an amendment that that student believes should be added to the Constitution. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer, with consent of the instructor, from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. Elements used in grading: class attendance, participation, class presentations, and final paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Feingold, R. (PI)

LAW 7081: Family Law II: Parent-Child Relationships

This course will examine the legal regulation of the parent-child relationship. The law used to be much simpler than it is today. The law treated marriage as the near exclusive setting for the rearing of children, defining the woman who gave birth to the child was the mother, and the man to whom she was married as the father. In recent decades, that simple legal principle has collapsed under the weight of social and technological change. The central social change is the reconfiguration of marriage and the multiplicity of settings in which children are raised. The advent of same sex marriage and same sex couples undermine longstanding assumptions about the legal definition of parent. And the fact that 4 in every 10 children are born to unmarried couples, and that nearly half of all married couples will divorce (often with either or both partners remarrying) introduce a dizzying array of possible family configurations. Advances in genetic testing complicate matters further, by allowing b more »
This course will examine the legal regulation of the parent-child relationship. The law used to be much simpler than it is today. The law treated marriage as the near exclusive setting for the rearing of children, defining the woman who gave birth to the child was the mother, and the man to whom she was married as the father. In recent decades, that simple legal principle has collapsed under the weight of social and technological change. The central social change is the reconfiguration of marriage and the multiplicity of settings in which children are raised. The advent of same sex marriage and same sex couples undermine longstanding assumptions about the legal definition of parent. And the fact that 4 in every 10 children are born to unmarried couples, and that nearly half of all married couples will divorce (often with either or both partners remarrying) introduce a dizzying array of possible family configurations. Advances in genetic testing complicate matters further, by allowing biological parents to be identified with near certainty. Thus, there is less reason to treat a woman's husband as her child's father. Many couples use reproductive technologies involving the donation of sperm, the donation of eggs or even the use of a surrogate mother to gestate the child. The use of such technologies can result in many adults having some form of tie to the child, a situation that has prompted some jurisdictions to recognize the possibilities of more than 2 parents! In sum, nonmarital, nonbiological, and same-sex parenting have become central, rather than peripheral features of the familial landscape. These changes highlight provocative and fundamental inquiries: What, exactly, does, and should, make one a parent in the view of the law? And how should the state allocate rights and responsbilities, related to custody, financial support and visitation, as families fracture and reconfigure? Elements used in grading: Participation, Exam.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 7082: Free Speech, Democracy and the Internet

This course, which will be cotaught by Monika Bickert from Facebook, will cover contemporary challenges to democracy presented by the Internet. Topics will include disinformation, polarization, hate speech, media transformation, election integrity, and legal regulation of internet platforms in the U.S. and abroad. Guest speakers from academia and industry will present on these topics in each class session, followed by a discussion. Students will be responsible for one-page papers each week on the readings and a research paper to be turned in at the fall paper deadline. Students can take the class for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the research paper length. This class is crosslisted in the university and undergraduates are eligible to take it. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Communication ( COMM 153B/253B) and International Policy ( INTLPOL 323).
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

LAW 7083: Race and Law Workshop

The Race and Law Workshop will meet once each week. The broad theme of the workshop is to probe the relation of law and justice with respect to race and inequality. Most weeks will feature a speaker who will present a draft of a paper. Students will have read the paper, and often, additional materials related to the subject matter of the paper, and will write responses to the paper, which will be shared with the speaker before the session. The session will consist of discussion of the speaker's paper and the students' responses. The aim of the workshop is to expose students to current scholarship about race and law, to improve the speaker's paper, and to deepen student's thinking about the relationship between law and racial justice (and injustice). Elements used in grading: Written Papers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Banks, R. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints