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371 - 380 of 461 results for: LAW

LAW 7059: Labor Law

This course is a survey of the law of labor relations; it is designed to provide the student with an acquaintance with the more important problems of labor law but not with a comprehensive coverage of the entire field. In particular, the course will focus upon the historical development of labor law, problems relating to union organization, recognition, and the duty to bargain collectively. The course will also examine some aspects of arbitration and the law relating to the enforcement of collective bargaining as well as non-union arbitration. The course will include some discussion of the relationship between law and politics in administrative agencies. Elements used in grading: Final Exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Gould, W. (PI)

LAW 7060: Law and Continental Thought: Resistance

Dominant trends in continental thought will be studied with an emphasis on the complex evolution of the relationship between theories of the rule of law and the definition and assertion of liberal democratic rights, on the one hand, and the sources of systematic legal failure and justifications of resistance to law, on the other. The roots, development, and pathologies of post-structural theory will be a central preoccupation of the course, as will the tensions between post-structuralism and the premises of liberal democratic thought. Major works by a range of theorists (such as Marx, Freud, Nietzsche, Benjamin, Fanon, Lacan, Foucault, Bhabba, Butler, Said, Chakrabarty, Haraway, Crenshaw, Ranciere, and Agamben) will be situated in relation to historical and theoretical interpretations of discrete 19th and 20th century resistance movements. No prior work in philosophy or critical theory is required to enroll in the seminar. Students may elect to write an 'R' credit paper or complete a 10-12 page essay. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Grading Elements: attendance, active class participation and written assignments (essay or research paper).
Last offered: Autumn 2017

LAW 7061: Children Sexuality and the Law

This seminar focuses on federal and state law designed to protect children from sexual exploitation, as well as federal constitutional law regulating young adults' expressive rights with regard to gender and sexual identity. The seminar provides a general introduction to some of the laws governing children's sexual autonomy as well as necessary protections from sexual abuse; however, the seminar's primary purpose is to teach students about how the law discursively constructs children as it attempts to protect them. Specifically, students will explore how laws designed to protect children from sexual exploitation also naturalize certain assumptions about children's perceptions, cognitive capacities, interests and vulnerabilities. Our discussions will explore how the law, while attempting to catalogue and regulate the potential threats children face, also instantiates certain ideas about children's potential sex-related injuries and how these injures can affect them over time. Finally, s more »
This seminar focuses on federal and state law designed to protect children from sexual exploitation, as well as federal constitutional law regulating young adults' expressive rights with regard to gender and sexual identity. The seminar provides a general introduction to some of the laws governing children's sexual autonomy as well as necessary protections from sexual abuse; however, the seminar's primary purpose is to teach students about how the law discursively constructs children as it attempts to protect them. Specifically, students will explore how laws designed to protect children from sexual exploitation also naturalize certain assumptions about children's perceptions, cognitive capacities, interests and vulnerabilities. Our discussions will explore how the law, while attempting to catalogue and regulate the potential threats children face, also instantiates certain ideas about children's potential sex-related injuries and how these injures can affect them over time. Finally, seminar discussions will explore whether there are any inconsistencies between the understanding of childhood, sexual injury, capacity, and autonomy in various areas of state child protection laws, federal constitutional law, and relevant federal statutes. In addition to considering how laws regulating children's sexuality affect children, the seminar will also examine how the same laws effectively constrain adults' behavior, as well as shape our understanding of the role of certain social institutions. Laws intended to more generally protect children from sexual exploitation also regulate children's relationships to their parents, affect our understanding of the role of schools, and even our understanding of the role libraries and the internet play in educating citizens. Seminar discussions will focus on how discursive constructs and social understandings about children contained in law both constrain and enable us in discussions of child sexuality. We will also consider how these constructs and understandings empower certain institutions by legitimating certain kinds of intervention. Students can choose to write three short response papers for two units or a final research paper for three units. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the Research (R) requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation; Written Assignments or a Final Research Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Winter 2017

LAW 7062: Originalism

This two-credit seminar will explore the theory and practice of "originalism" -- the idea that the Constitution should be interpreted in light of the meaning of its text to those who had authority to enact it. This is a controversial approach (as are the others) and we will read and consider critics as well as proponents, so that students can make up their own minds. The first part of the seminar will be devoted to the theory: how it works, what are its justifications, what are its flaws, the various versions. The remainder will be devoted to specific applications. Because there are far more topics than we have time to cover, students will vote on the first day for which topics we will take up. Among the choices are: executive power, speech and press, liberty under the Fourteenth Amendment, equality under the Fourteenth Amendment, gun rights, searches and seizures, and freedom of religion. Two students will assist in leading class discussions. Elements used in grading: Grades will be b more »
This two-credit seminar will explore the theory and practice of "originalism" -- the idea that the Constitution should be interpreted in light of the meaning of its text to those who had authority to enact it. This is a controversial approach (as are the others) and we will read and consider critics as well as proponents, so that students can make up their own minds. The first part of the seminar will be devoted to the theory: how it works, what are its justifications, what are its flaws, the various versions. The remainder will be devoted to specific applications. Because there are far more topics than we have time to cover, students will vote on the first day for which topics we will take up. Among the choices are: executive power, speech and press, liberty under the Fourteenth Amendment, equality under the Fourteenth Amendment, gun rights, searches and seizures, and freedom of religion. Two students will assist in leading class discussions. Elements used in grading: Grades will be based 20% on participation and 80% on papers. Students will have the choice of one longer research paper or three shorter reflection papers. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from Section 01 into Section 02 (long research paper), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

LAW 7063: Youth Law and Policy

This course examines current issues in youth law and policy with a focus on the potential and collateral effects of law on certain subpopulations of vulnerable youth. Substantively, the course focuses on case law and statutes in delinquency, dependency, education, public benefits, and health access with an attention to cross-section themes of poverty, economic justice, race, and youth voice. By the end of the course, students will have developed a better understanding of how litigation, legislation, and policy in youth law come about through examining recent developments in the field and the tools advocates have used to enact change. Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from the exam section (01) into paper section (02), with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments; Exam or Final Paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

LAW 7065: One in Five: The Law, Politics, and Policy of Campus Sexual Assault

TRIGGER WARNING: Over the past three years, the issue of campus sexual assault has exploded into the public discourse. While definitive figures are difficult to obtain due to the necessarily private nature of these events, several recent studies estimate that between 20-25% of college women (and a potentially higher proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as around 5-10% of male students) experience sexual assault. People of color, LGBT students, disabled individuals and other vulnerable groups are at increased risk. This is also a significant problem in k12 education. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by what they describe as an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators. These survivors have launched one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. As a result, the federal government under President Obama stepped up its civil rights en more »
TRIGGER WARNING: Over the past three years, the issue of campus sexual assault has exploded into the public discourse. While definitive figures are difficult to obtain due to the necessarily private nature of these events, several recent studies estimate that between 20-25% of college women (and a potentially higher proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as around 5-10% of male students) experience sexual assault. People of color, LGBT students, disabled individuals and other vulnerable groups are at increased risk. This is also a significant problem in k12 education. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by what they describe as an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators. These survivors have launched one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. As a result, the federal government under President Obama stepped up its civil rights enforcement in this area, with over 300 colleges and universities under investigation for allegedly mishandling student sexual assault complaints as of July 2017. At the same time, this heightened response has led to a series of high-profile lawsuits by accused students who assert that they were falsely accused or subjected to mishandled investigations that lacked sufficient due process protections. The one thing that survivors and accused students appear to agree on is that colleges are not handling these matters appropriately. Colleges have meanwhile complained of being whipsawed between survivors, accused students, interest groups, and enforcement authorities. The election of President Trump has now created significant uncertainty about how this issue will be handled by the Department of Education going forward. The Trump Administration took the extraordinary step this September of rolling back all of the Obama Administration guidance on this subject. Meanwhile Congress has been unable to pass legislation addressing the issue, though there are several bipartisan bills under consideration. This course focuses on the legal, policy, and political issues surrounding sexual assault on college campuses. We will learn background about sexual violence and the efforts to implement legal protections for survivors in the educational context. We will also study the basic legal frameworks governing campus assault, focusing on the relevant federal laws such as Title IX and the Clery Act. We will hear from guest speakers who are actively involved in shaping policy and advocating in this area, including lawyers, lobbyists, filmmakers, journalists, and policymakers. The subject matter of this course is sensitive and students are expected to treat the material with sensitivity. Much of the reading and subject matter may be upsetting and/or triggering for students who identify as survivors. There is no therapeutic component for this course, although supportive campus resources and Title IX staff are available for those who need them. This course was previously a Sophomore College Class that is now being offered as a regular quarter-length course. Elements used in grading: Grades will be based on class attendance, class participation, and either several short reflection papers (section 01) or an independent research paper (section 02). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section 01 into section 02, which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Enrollment is by INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION. Access the consent form here feminist.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-program/forms or email rmeisels@stanford.edu to request a form via email. Cross-listed with Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies ( FEMGEN 143) and Sociology ( SOC 188).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Dauber, M. (PI)

LAW 7066: The Law of Politics

Course descriptions and elements used in grading: TBA

LAW 7067: Law and Policy in the Post-Obama Era

This course will consider a number of current issues of law and policy that achieved prominence during the Presidency of Barack Obama and remain unresolved. These issues include: 1) immigration law reform and DACA, 2) the role of the Department of Justice in reforming local and federal criminal law enforcement, 3) the role of government policy in regulating the economy and financial system, in facilitating heath insurance, and in remedying economic inequality, 4) the proper balance between national security and civil liberties/human rights, as exemplified by the debates over the status of the Guantanamo Bay detention facility and drone warfare. In each of these areas, and others, debates about law and policy had reached a seeming, or potential, consensus in early 2009, but that consensus quickly fell apart. In each area, the gap between differing formulations of law and policy that had existed until recently has widened. Keeping in mind the time limitations of this course, we will brie more »
This course will consider a number of current issues of law and policy that achieved prominence during the Presidency of Barack Obama and remain unresolved. These issues include: 1) immigration law reform and DACA, 2) the role of the Department of Justice in reforming local and federal criminal law enforcement, 3) the role of government policy in regulating the economy and financial system, in facilitating heath insurance, and in remedying economic inequality, 4) the proper balance between national security and civil liberties/human rights, as exemplified by the debates over the status of the Guantanamo Bay detention facility and drone warfare. In each of these areas, and others, debates about law and policy had reached a seeming, or potential, consensus in early 2009, but that consensus quickly fell apart. In each area, the gap between differing formulations of law and policy that had existed until recently has widened. Keeping in mind the time limitations of this course, we will briefly examine most of these of law and policy -- the governing legal doctrines and policies, their evolution since 2009, and their present and future prospects. The course will ask: What accounts for these differing visions of law and policy? What accounts for the inability of the political and legal system to resolve them? What are the possible ways forward? Class format will consist mainly of readings and class discussion, and students are encouraged to bring their own perspectives to bear on these difficult and timely issues. Class will meet Monday-Thursday, January 8-11, 7:15 PM to 9:15 PM and Tuesday of the following week, January 16, 6:20 PM to 7:20 PM. Elements used in grading: Class Participation.
Last offered: Winter 2018

LAW 7070: Federal Indian Law: Historiographical Readings in Federal Law and Policy

This is the one unit, Mandatory P/R/F component to Federal Indian Law ( LAW 7030). Enrollment is by consent of instructor. See LAW 7030 in the SLS Course Catalog for details. Students will meet five times over the quarter. Meeting dates to be arranged with the instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, reading assignments, and a short paper.
Last offered: Spring 2019

LAW 7071: Philanthropy and Civil Society

Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 units. Cross-listed with Education ( EDUC 374), Political Science ( POLISCI 334) and Sociology ( SOC 374).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
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