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341 - 350 of 460 results for: LAW

LAW 7027: Critical Race Theory (Reading Group)

This reading group will investigate unresolved issues in Critical Race Theory. Questions explored will include: What exactly are advocates for racial justice fighting for? That is, what does racial justice look like? What is the place of "culture" in our racial present and in a racial utopia? What are the roles of agency and structure -- individuals and institutions -- in perpetuating, and remedying, racial inequality? What is the role of law in undermining and/or entrenching racial stratification? Readings will be highly varied, coming from the fields of law, psychology, sociology, and anthropology, among others. Meeting Dates: This class will meet 4:15PM - 7:15PM on Thursday, September 29, October 27 and November 17. Elements used in grading: Grading will be based on participation, short reaction/response papers, and a final paper.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

LAW 7028: Lawyers and Leadership

This course will examine the responsibilities and challenges for those who occupy leadership roles, with particular emphasis on those seeking to use law as a vehicle for social and organizational change. Topics will include characteristics and styles of leadership, organizational dynamics, forms of influence, decision making, conflict management, innovation, diversity, ethical responsibilities, scandal, civil and human rights, and public interest law. Materials will include cutting-edge research, case histories, problems, exercises, and media clips. Class sessions will include visitors who have occupied leadership roles. Requirements will include class participation, and either short written weekly reflection papers (2 to 3 pages and a short research paper (about 3-5 pages) or (2) a long paper (approximately 26-30 pages). After the term begins, students can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Rhode, D. (PI)

LAW 7029: Legislation and Administration

(Formerly Law 394) This course explores the world of legislation and administration that defines much of our modern legal order. By analyzing agencies, statutes, and legislative procedures, the course prepares students to think about the structures and processes of government, and how they influence legal outcomes that would otherwise be defined largely by social norms and common law adjudication. Drawing on examples from a variety of substantive areas, the course covers the legislative process, approaches to statutory interpretation, the role of agencies and the legislature in a system of separated powers, delegation to agencies, the interaction of common law doctrines and agency practices, and techniques of agency regulation and adjudication. First-year students are welcome. Special Instructions: Students who receive credit for Legislation ( Law 319) and/or Statutory Interpretation ( Law 425) may not receive credit for Legislation and Administration ( Law 7029) and vice versa. Eleme more »
(Formerly Law 394) This course explores the world of legislation and administration that defines much of our modern legal order. By analyzing agencies, statutes, and legislative procedures, the course prepares students to think about the structures and processes of government, and how they influence legal outcomes that would otherwise be defined largely by social norms and common law adjudication. Drawing on examples from a variety of substantive areas, the course covers the legislative process, approaches to statutory interpretation, the role of agencies and the legislature in a system of separated powers, delegation to agencies, the interaction of common law doctrines and agency practices, and techniques of agency regulation and adjudication. First-year students are welcome. Special Instructions: Students who receive credit for Legislation ( Law 319) and/or Statutory Interpretation ( Law 425) may not receive credit for Legislation and Administration ( Law 7029) and vice versa. Elements used in grading: Attendance, participation in in-class discussion and simulation and occasional short assignments, being on "panel" for selected classes, and a self-scheduled open-book exam. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a simple Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Spring 2017

LAW 7030: Federal Indian Law

This course will provide an overview of the field of federal Indian law. It will consider the origins and scope of tribal sovereignty as recognized under federal law, as well as current federal law on tribal criminal and civil jurisdiction. It will also explore the division of authority between tribal, federal, and state governments; federal statutory schemes governing Natives and Native nations; and constitutional issues affecting Natives. Additional current legal issues which may be covered based on class selection include Native land claims, gaming, family law, religious and cultural rights, and natural resources. The course includes an optional supplementary trip to the Yurok Reservation in northern California in early May. Students enrolled in Federal Indian Law who wish to seek an extra unit of credit may concurrently enroll in Federal Indian Law: Historiographical Readings in Federal Law and Policy (1 unit/Mandatory P/R/F) with instructor consent. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Ablavsky, G. (PI)

LAW 7031: Political Campaigning in the Internet Age

This course will acquaint students with the changing environment for campaigns posed by the rise of the Internet. So much of the traditional way analysts have understood campaigns has revolved around television as the primary mode of campaign communication. The rise of the Internet, nonlinear television programming, and mobile communication enables new forms of campaigning. With particular focus on the 2016 campaign, this course will examine the relevant social science on these topics, while at the same time bringing in guest lecturers from industry, campaigns, and media. Requirements: Students will be required to complete a 25 page research paper on a topic relevant to the course. Law students enrolled in this class will have the option of participating in a one-week extension of the course ( Law 7056) in Delhi, India during spring break for an additional credit. Students may enroll for this course alone or for both this course and Law 7056. The overseas option is limited to 12 students. (See Law 7056 for application instructions and deadline). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Final Paper. This course is cross-listed with Communication ( COMM 153 & 253).
Last offered: Winter 2017

LAW 7032: Public Interest Law and Practice

(Formerly Law 617) This course will examine the history, theoretical frameworks, strategies used by, and political position of public interest law practice and attorneys in the United States. We will consider the role of lawyers and the legal system in advancing social change; different career paths of public interest lawyers; ethical issues related to working as a public interest lawyer; the personal impacts of this type of career choice; and tactics deployed by lawyers in differing settings, from issue-based non-profits to government agencies, and private public interest law firms or legal services groups. Readings will include law review articles, legal pleadings and case studies that allow analysis and exploration of the tensions and challenges that exist within the legal system for public interest practitioners. Guest speakers will include leaders from the field. Students will also be exposed to practical skills outside of litigation that social change lawyers should understand. Students will be asked to produce several short papers throughout the quarter. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, written assignments.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 7033: Race, Identity, and National Security

This course explores theoretical, historical, and legal policy questions at the intersection of race, group identity, and national security. Recent political events have thrust the relationship between race, religion, nationality, immigration status, and national security into the limelight, although the questions themselves are not new. How do national security threats affect the formation of racial identity within the United States, and how does race affect our understanding of national security? What is the proper role of courts in addressing challenges to national security policy affecting minority communities? This seminar aspires to understand contemporary policy questions in light of a broader theoretical, historical, and legal context. Class attendance and robust participation in discussion is required. There are two options for assignments in this course. You can either write 4 response papers throughout the course, or a single 18-20 page research paper related broadly to the more »
This course explores theoretical, historical, and legal policy questions at the intersection of race, group identity, and national security. Recent political events have thrust the relationship between race, religion, nationality, immigration status, and national security into the limelight, although the questions themselves are not new. How do national security threats affect the formation of racial identity within the United States, and how does race affect our understanding of national security? What is the proper role of courts in addressing challenges to national security policy affecting minority communities? This seminar aspires to understand contemporary policy questions in light of a broader theoretical, historical, and legal context. Class attendance and robust participation in discussion is required. There are two options for assignments in this course. You can either write 4 response papers throughout the course, or a single 18-20 page research paper related broadly to the themes of the course (for R credit). Those who choose the research paper option will be expected to discuss and submit an outline of their research paper while the course is in session and to submit the final paper in accordance with standard law school requirements. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Response Papers or Research Paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Sinnar, S. (PI)

LAW 7034: Race and Public Education

From at least Brown v. Board of Education, and many would say before that, education has been central to racial justice movements in America. More than fifty years after Brown, most American schools remain segregated by race and class, and many advocates still argue that the struggle for quality education is the key civil rights issue of our time. This course will examine a host of education-related legal and policy issues that intersect with questions of race and class. Topics will include: desegregation and re-segregation, tracking, charter schools, school vouchers, high-stakes testing, the Common Core, school discipline, the "school to prison pipeline," and education in alternative schools, juvenile facilities, and adult prisons. This will be a discussion-oriented course that will operate more like a seminar than a lecture. This class is limited to 30 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (20 students will be selected by lottery) and students from the School of Education (10 students). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Last offered: Winter 2017

LAW 7036: Law of Democracy

This course is intended to give students a basic understanding of the themes in the legal regulation of elections and politics. We will cover all the major Supreme Court cases on topics of voting rights, reapportionment/redistricting, ballot access, regulation of political parties, campaign finance, and the 2000 presidential election controversy. The course pays particular attention to competing political philosophies and empirical assumptions that underlie the Court's reasoning while still focusing on the cases as litigation tools used to serve political ends. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam. Cross-listed with Communication ( COMM 361) International Policy ( INTLPOL 351), and Political Science ( POLISCI 327C).
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

LAW 7037: Poverty Law: Policy and Practice

(Formerly Law 614) This survey course will cover historical and contemporary policy debates about poverty in the U.S. Topics will include the constitutional treatment of poverty, as well as the legal and policy treatment of questions of access to specific social goods, such as housing, health care, education, and legal services. We will also discuss "hot topics" in the field, such as criminalization of poverty, international perspectives on poverty, wage theft, and recent policy analyses at the 20th anniversary of welfare reform. Materials will include practice-derived materials as well as scholarly treatment of the issues. Students with a range of backgrounds and perspectives on the issues are encouraged to enroll. While a survey class, lecturing will be minimal, with student leadership of and participation in discussion will be principal methodology. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Exam.
Last offered: Autumn 2016
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