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311 - 320 of 461 results for: LAW

LAW 6006: Introduction to Legal Design

(Formerly Law 761) Intro to Legal Design is a 9-week course for law students & other graduate students to reimagine how legal services are delivered, & to learn how to use human-centered design methods to create breakthrough solutions to complex problems. The students will work with project partners - including legal aid groups, courts, and private law firms -- on legal service challenges to help the partners solve real problems they & their users face. For each challenge, students will work on interdisciplinary teams, with close coaching from designers, engineers & lawyers. Students will learn design methods to create new innovations that make legal services more accessible & engaging. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments.
Last offered: Spring 2018

LAW 6007: Legal Profession Workshop: The Future of Big Law

Ever since the global financial crisis, legal media have focused on the contraction of the corporate legal services sector. But today, partners at the top tier of big corporate law firms -- "big law" -- are earning huge profits and job prospects for graduates of top law schools interested in the corporate sector are bright. Although some commentators continue to predict that demand for corporate legal services will contract in the mid- to long-term, it seems more likely that demand for high-end legal analysis in the foreseeable future. The question is who (or what) is going to perform that work, in what organizational setting, with what technological assistance, and in what part of the world. This seminar will address the key dimensions of change in the "big law" market and how changes in the delivery of corporate legal services may affect legal careers, gender equality, diversity, and work-life balance. Topics include the increased power of Fortune 100 General Counsel, new organizatio more »
Ever since the global financial crisis, legal media have focused on the contraction of the corporate legal services sector. But today, partners at the top tier of big corporate law firms -- "big law" -- are earning huge profits and job prospects for graduates of top law schools interested in the corporate sector are bright. Although some commentators continue to predict that demand for corporate legal services will contract in the mid- to long-term, it seems more likely that demand for high-end legal analysis in the foreseeable future. The question is who (or what) is going to perform that work, in what organizational setting, with what technological assistance, and in what part of the world. This seminar will address the key dimensions of change in the "big law" market and how changes in the delivery of corporate legal services may affect legal careers, gender equality, diversity, and work-life balance. Topics include the increased power of Fortune 100 General Counsel, new organizational models for delivering corporate legal services, the response of large law firms to new market factors, the expanding role of information technology in the delivery of corporate legal services, third-party litigation financing, changing legal markets outside the US, the evolution of global law firms, the effects of changes in law firm organization on women and lawyers of color, and the effects of changes in the legal market on legal careers. Course materials will include books and journal articles, media reports, blog posts and guest lectures. Students may enroll in one of three sections: Students in Section 01 will receive 3 credits and write research papers on a topic of their choice, relying primarily on existing literature (e.g. journal articles, media reports and blog posts). These papers will be due on the regular submission date for Winter Quarter Courses. Students in Section 02 will receive 4 credits and write research papers on a topic of their choice, based on their own empirical research projects. Students may use existing ALM datasets (available through the library), conduct qualitative interviews or online surveys, scrape data from the Web, or use other data sources in their research. Prof. Hensler will meet with students in Section 02 as necessary to advise on research design, data collection and analysis. Research papers for Section 02 will be due on the submission date FOR THE SPRING QUARTER. Students in Section 03 will receive 2 credits and write 3 reflection papers on topic of guest lectures and class discussions. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) or section (3) into section (02) with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation and research paper.

LAW 6015: Innovations in the Delivery of Legal Services

This is an era of groundbreaking change in the legal profession. Twenty years ago, email was unheard of at most law firms. Today, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and online services are creating a fundamental shift in how law is practiced. Beyond technology, massive challenges to the code of professional responsibility, from multi-disciplinary practices to law firms filing for IPOs, are reshaping the legal landscape. This course focuses on the opportunities and challenges these disruptions create for the new lawyer. Students will gain hands-on experience with some of the most innovative organizations in the legal community. Significant time will also be spent analyzing changes anticipated to impact the legal industry in the next decade. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Final Paper.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

LAW 6016: Challenges Facing the Legal Profession

This course is designed to expose students to challenges facing the profession they will soon join by bringing in law-firm partners and in-house counsel to engage with students on a series of topics. The topics will likely include: the changing relationship between in-house and outside counsel; ways that technology is changing the practice of law; diversity and inclusion at law firms and/or in corporate legal departments; and the skills/expertise needed by business lawyers for tech companies. Students will write three reflection papers of 3-4 pages each, including one where they choose an issue that they are personally committed to or interested in advancing as they enter the profession. There will be seven sessions, each meeting for 80 minutes, and attendance at each session is expected and required. The class will meet the first seven weeks of the term. Though the topics covered overlap to a certain extent with Law 6005, that course involves a research paper and explores some of the underlying issues in greater depth. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 7001: Administrative Law

Administrative agencies interpret statutes, promulgate regulations, and adjudicate disputes, thereby affecting vast areas of life -- from employment to food and drug safety, from the environment to energy markets, and from telecommunications to immigration. This course surveys the law of the administrative state, considering rationales for delegation to administrative agencies, procedural and substantive constraints on agency decision-making, and the judicial review of agency actions. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, assignments, final exam. Attendance is required to retain a seat in class.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Ho, D. (PI)

LAW 7001: Administrative Law

Federal agencies make an astounding number of policy decisions, engaging in more lawmaking and adjudication than Congress and the federal courts, respectively. These policy decisions range from the seemingly trivial, such as the size of holes in Swiss cheese, to matters of life-and-death importance, such as how to limit emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and mercury. These agencies also range in age, organization, and duties. There is the postal service, which was created over 200 years ago, and changed almost 50 years ago from a cabinet-level department to a government corporation. On the newer side, there is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which was established in 2011 to protect consumers in the financial arena and faces considerable scrutiny on constitutional and other grounds. In this quarter of Administrative Law, we will consider the creation and control of the modern administrative state. Topics will include the structure of administrative agencies and thei more »
Federal agencies make an astounding number of policy decisions, engaging in more lawmaking and adjudication than Congress and the federal courts, respectively. These policy decisions range from the seemingly trivial, such as the size of holes in Swiss cheese, to matters of life-and-death importance, such as how to limit emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and mercury. These agencies also range in age, organization, and duties. There is the postal service, which was created over 200 years ago, and changed almost 50 years ago from a cabinet-level department to a government corporation. On the newer side, there is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which was established in 2011 to protect consumers in the financial arena and faces considerable scrutiny on constitutional and other grounds. In this quarter of Administrative Law, we will consider the creation and control of the modern administrative state. Topics will include the structure of administrative agencies and their place in a governing scheme of separated but overlapping powers, delegation of authority to agencies, types and requirements of agency decisionmaking, availability and scope of judicial review of agency action (and inaction), and other forms of agency oversight. We will apply concepts through many recent examples. A variety of policy areas will be considered, including (among others) national security, financial regulation, health care, the environment, food and drugs, and telecommunications. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Exam. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. This course will be capped at 65 students, randomly selected.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

LAW 7002: Beyond the Common Law: Tort Reform and Tort Alternatives

(Formerly Law 563) Over the past century, tort law has been under sustained attack. Using a broad mix of case law, case studies, and scholarly analysis, this seminar will interrogate those attacks-including their historical roots, their theoretical justifications, and their practical effects. We will first study "replacement reforms"-attempts to jettison the common law in favor of alternative compensation mechanisms, including workers' compensation, auto no-fault, the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, and the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, housed within the U.S. Court of Claims. Second, we will study modern tort reform initiatives, often dubbed "discouragement reforms," which have chiseled away at damages and chilled personal injury victims' incentives and capacity to seek relief. Finally, we will study the United States Supreme Court's own tort reform activity, including recent jurisprudence limiting punitive damages, preferencing arbitration, and granting broad preempti more »
(Formerly Law 563) Over the past century, tort law has been under sustained attack. Using a broad mix of case law, case studies, and scholarly analysis, this seminar will interrogate those attacks-including their historical roots, their theoretical justifications, and their practical effects. We will first study "replacement reforms"-attempts to jettison the common law in favor of alternative compensation mechanisms, including workers' compensation, auto no-fault, the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, and the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, housed within the U.S. Court of Claims. Second, we will study modern tort reform initiatives, often dubbed "discouragement reforms," which have chiseled away at damages and chilled personal injury victims' incentives and capacity to seek relief. Finally, we will study the United States Supreme Court's own tort reform activity, including recent jurisprudence limiting punitive damages, preferencing arbitration, and granting broad preemptive effect to agency actions. Through this analysis, students will develop a deeper and richer understanding of the tort system, its contemporary operation and excesses, and the uneasy but undeniably important place tort law-and civil litigation more generally-occupies in contemporary American society. Special Instructions: Grades will be based on class attendance, class participation, and either several short reflection papers (section (01)) or an independent research paper (section (02)). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 2 or 3 units, depending on paper length. Elements used in grading: Class participation, class attendance, reflection papers or research paper. Early drop deadline.
Last offered: Winter 2017

LAW 7003: Cities in Distress

(Formerly Law 735) Despite the end of the Great Recession, serious fiscal challenges remain for many urban and rural local governments. This course will focus on these places and what they need from state and local government. Subjects will include: (1) the basics of local finance; (2) an introduction to the primary causes of local fiscal distress; (3) tools for state and federal governance of city finances and financial distress (including municipal bankruptcy and state receiverships); and (4) the local public sector's role in anti-poverty work, especially after significant losses in local employment. The course will feature readings focused on places (both urban and rural) across the country. Class performance will be evaluated based on class participation, an in-class presentation, and weekly reflection papers of 3-5 pages each week for most of our topics. Completion or co-enrollment with Local Government or Land Use Law is useful but not required. Elements Used in Grading: Class P more »
(Formerly Law 735) Despite the end of the Great Recession, serious fiscal challenges remain for many urban and rural local governments. This course will focus on these places and what they need from state and local government. Subjects will include: (1) the basics of local finance; (2) an introduction to the primary causes of local fiscal distress; (3) tools for state and federal governance of city finances and financial distress (including municipal bankruptcy and state receiverships); and (4) the local public sector's role in anti-poverty work, especially after significant losses in local employment. The course will feature readings focused on places (both urban and rural) across the country. Class performance will be evaluated based on class participation, an in-class presentation, and weekly reflection papers of 3-5 pages each week for most of our topics. Completion or co-enrollment with Local Government or Land Use Law is useful but not required. Elements Used in Grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments or Research Paper. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 7005: Constitutional Politics

This seminar will explore various ways in which constitutional law interacts with the political process. Topics covered will include the appointment and confirmation process for federal judges, judicial campaigns and elections in the states, various approaches to "popular constitutionalism," ratification of constitutional amendments, judicial activism as a political issue, public opinion and the Supreme Court, court-curbing legislation, and the role of interest groups in constitutional litigation. Readings will include cases, as well as perspectives from legal scholars, political scientists and historians. Students will be assigned to prepare and circulate discussion questions for one week of the class. Students can choose to write a final R paper or take an exam. Students writing the paper may take the class for 2 credits or write a longer paper for 3 credits. The paper will be due at the law school's paper deadline for fall quarter classes. Students taking the exam will be asked to a more »
This seminar will explore various ways in which constitutional law interacts with the political process. Topics covered will include the appointment and confirmation process for federal judges, judicial campaigns and elections in the states, various approaches to "popular constitutionalism," ratification of constitutional amendments, judicial activism as a political issue, public opinion and the Supreme Court, court-curbing legislation, and the role of interest groups in constitutional litigation. Readings will include cases, as well as perspectives from legal scholars, political scientists and historians. Students will be assigned to prepare and circulate discussion questions for one week of the class. Students can choose to write a final R paper or take an exam. Students writing the paper may take the class for 2 credits or write a longer paper for 3 credits. The paper will be due at the law school's paper deadline for fall quarter classes. Students taking the exam will be asked to answer one or more essay questions about the major issues covered in the class. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: The grade will be based on the paper or exam, along with class participation.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

LAW 7006: Current Issues in Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

This seminar will address current issues in civil liberties and civil rights arising at both the federal and state level, with an emphasis on the policies of the Trump administration. It is intended to be both timely and topical. As a result, the initial syllabus may be revised if new and significant issues later emerge. Among the topics that are likely to be discussed are hate speech, immigration, reproductive rights, voting rights, affirmative action, LGBT rights, and privacy. We will begin by focusing first on background legal principles and then on applying those legal principles to each debated policy. We will also consider the real world consequences that flow from different legal outcomes. There is no casebook. Instead, weekly readings will consist of judicial decisions, statutory and regulatory texts, and published articles (both academic and popular). Any that are not easily accessible will be circulated prior to class. Elements used in grading: Grades will be based on class a more »
This seminar will address current issues in civil liberties and civil rights arising at both the federal and state level, with an emphasis on the policies of the Trump administration. It is intended to be both timely and topical. As a result, the initial syllabus may be revised if new and significant issues later emerge. Among the topics that are likely to be discussed are hate speech, immigration, reproductive rights, voting rights, affirmative action, LGBT rights, and privacy. We will begin by focusing first on background legal principles and then on applying those legal principles to each debated policy. We will also consider the real world consequences that flow from different legal outcomes. There is no casebook. Instead, weekly readings will consist of judicial decisions, statutory and regulatory texts, and published articles (both academic and popular). Any that are not easily accessible will be circulated prior to class. Elements used in grading: Grades will be based on class attendance, class participation, and either several short papers (Section 01) or an independent research paper for Research credit (Section 02). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2019
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