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271 - 280 of 460 results for: LAW

LAW 5021: Current Topics in International Economic Law

This seminar will explore select topics in international economic law, including but not limited to: the formation of new free trade agreements (in particular the proposed Pacific and Atlantic partnerships); the inclusion of "next generation" issues into trade agreements; the expanding use of investment arbitration; the architecture of the Eurozone in relation to recent European Union jurisprudence and policy; and the global regulation of cross-border financial flows. An introductory course in international trade law (or equivalent preparation) is prerequisite. In addition to a final paper, students will be expected to produce weekly reading responses. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Last offered: Spring 2017

LAW 5023: The Rule of Law - The Foundation of Functional Communities

(Formerly Law 679) We will seek to determine a useful meaning of the notion of the rule of law, to identify a credible measurement of adherence, and to explore the importance of the rule of law in terms of economic, socio-political and human development. We will focus on accountable government and private actors; just laws; open processes for the enactment, administration and enforcement of laws and impartial dispute resolution. Readings will include the works of philosophers, political theorists and jurists from the 17th to the 21st century as well as contemporary scholars. This seminar will feature experts in the field as guest lectures and requires three reaction papers from all participants. Elements used in grading: Class participation and reaction papers.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 5025: Global Poverty and the Law

With more than a billion people living on less than $2 a day, global poverty is one of the biggest challenges currently facing humanity. Even though those who suffer the most are located in the developing world, many of the policies, economic opportunities, and legal actions that offer the biggest potential for global poverty alleviation are made in the United States. This course will provide an introduction to the study of global poverty. What causes poverty? Why have some parts of the developing world done better at alleviating poverty than other parts? Can the world ever be free of poverty, as the World Bank's official motto suggests? And most importantly, what can aspiring lawyers do to improve the condition of the world's impoverished? These are some of the questions this course is designed to address. This course is designed especially for future lawyers and policymakers who seek a deeper understanding of the developing world. After a brief overview that will familiarize students more »
With more than a billion people living on less than $2 a day, global poverty is one of the biggest challenges currently facing humanity. Even though those who suffer the most are located in the developing world, many of the policies, economic opportunities, and legal actions that offer the biggest potential for global poverty alleviation are made in the United States. This course will provide an introduction to the study of global poverty. What causes poverty? Why have some parts of the developing world done better at alleviating poverty than other parts? Can the world ever be free of poverty, as the World Bank's official motto suggests? And most importantly, what can aspiring lawyers do to improve the condition of the world's impoverished? These are some of the questions this course is designed to address. This course is designed especially for future lawyers and policymakers who seek a deeper understanding of the developing world. After a brief overview that will familiarize students with the major concepts and empirical debates in poverty and development studies, we will examine a variety of 'causes' of poverty, from poor governance to lack of economic opportunity to the role of society. Since this course is just as much about what can be done, we shall also consider applied approaches to poverty alleviation. These types of interventions include political/legal reforms such as anti-corruption initiatives, 'rule of law' interventions, right to information programs, privatization, and community-driven development models; economic solutions such as cash transfers and microfinance; and technological approaches such as new methods for measuring policy impact and the application of new technologies for state identification and distribution programs. In addition to more typical scholarly readings, students will review poverty alleviation policy proposals and contracts made by various stakeholders (academics, NGOs, states, international bodies, etc.). Grading is based on participation, a presentation of research or a proposal, and, in consultation with the professor, a research paper. The research paper may be a group project (Section 01) graded MP/R/F or an individual in-depth research proposal either of which could be the basis for future field research (Section 02) graded H/P/R/F. Students approved for Section 01 or Section 02 may receive R credit. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from Section 01 into Section 02 with consent of the instructor. Automatic grading penalty waived for research paper. This course is taught in conjunction with the India Field Study component ( Law 5026). Students may enroll for this course alone or for both this course and Law 5026 with consent of the instructor (12 students will come to India). See Law 5026 for application instructions. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with International Policy Studies ( INTLPOL 281).
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 5026: Global Poverty, Corruption, and the Law: India Field Study

This is the India Field Study component of Global Poverty and the Law ( Law 5025). For details, see course description for Law 5025. Corruption is one of the most difficult challenges facing societies across the developing world. Why is corruption so pervasive and what can be done to address it? During spring break 2019, this course will be held in Delhi, India and will consist of conversations with lawyers, politicians, scholars, leaders in civil society, and senior bureaucrats who are active in anti-corruption efforts. Students will also meet frontline bureaucrats (i.e., cops and government teachers) who will share their own perspectives about the problem. Enrollment is limited to 12 students. PLEASE NOTE: Students will need a passport and a visa to travel to India. Students will be required to attend two dinner meetings during the Winter Quarter in preparation for the trip. Elements used in grading: class participation and short writing assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website. See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

LAW 5027: Social Conflict, Social Justice, and Human Rights in 21st Century Latin America

This course will consider significant sources of social conflict, efforts to achieve social justice and the relevance and impact of human rights norms and oversight mechanisms in Latin America in the 21st Century. Led by Prof. James Cavallaro, the course will involve weekly sessions, each focusing on a particular topic. Readings will provide the basis for short student reflection papers to be prepared in advance of each session. The class will generally involve an initial presentation, followed by seminar-style discussion. Topics will include the human rights crisis facing Mexico, in particular, forced disappearances, summary executions and torture. We will consider, for example, the forced disappearance of 43 students in September 2014 (Ayotzinapa) in at least one session. The current political and human rights crisis facing Venezuela will be considered, likely by an expert guest speaker. So too will the peace process in Colombia and the Special Jurisdiction for Peace. Other sessions more »
This course will consider significant sources of social conflict, efforts to achieve social justice and the relevance and impact of human rights norms and oversight mechanisms in Latin America in the 21st Century. Led by Prof. James Cavallaro, the course will involve weekly sessions, each focusing on a particular topic. Readings will provide the basis for short student reflection papers to be prepared in advance of each session. The class will generally involve an initial presentation, followed by seminar-style discussion. Topics will include the human rights crisis facing Mexico, in particular, forced disappearances, summary executions and torture. We will consider, for example, the forced disappearance of 43 students in September 2014 (Ayotzinapa) in at least one session. The current political and human rights crisis facing Venezuela will be considered, likely by an expert guest speaker. So too will the peace process in Colombia and the Special Jurisdiction for Peace. Other sessions will consider social conflict and justice issues across the region. These issues will include the resurgence of populism in the United States and Latin America and its effects on social justice and human rights, the continued relevance of the Organization of American States and its human rights bodies, migration and human rights, the rights of indigenous and traditional peoples and models of development, among others. Elements used in grading: Grades will be based on class participation, and either several short reflection papers (section 01) or a final paper (section 02). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

LAW 5028: Regional Human Rights Protections: The Inter-American System

This course provides an in-depth introduction to the doctrine, practice and critiques of the Inter-American Human Rights System ("IASHR"). Students will examine the major instruments for human rights protections in the IASHR, the Inter-American Court and Commission's procedure and jurisprudence, as well as the obstacles and opportunities that civil society, victims, and advocates encounter when engaging the inter-American system. The Course will consider issues of implementation, and the types of measures and forms of relief that can be sought from the Court and the Commission. The inter-American system has played a crucial role in opening spaces for debate on human rights protections in Latin America and the Caribbean, increasing protections at the domestic level, and supporting civil society in its quest for accountability for massive human rights violations. The system has also played a role in civil society efforts to bring the human rights debate home, including in the United Stat more »
This course provides an in-depth introduction to the doctrine, practice and critiques of the Inter-American Human Rights System ("IASHR"). Students will examine the major instruments for human rights protections in the IASHR, the Inter-American Court and Commission's procedure and jurisprudence, as well as the obstacles and opportunities that civil society, victims, and advocates encounter when engaging the inter-American system. The Course will consider issues of implementation, and the types of measures and forms of relief that can be sought from the Court and the Commission. The inter-American system has played a crucial role in opening spaces for debate on human rights protections in Latin America and the Caribbean, increasing protections at the domestic level, and supporting civil society in its quest for accountability for massive human rights violations. The system has also played a role in civil society efforts to bring the human rights debate home, including in the United States. Students will have an opportunity to cast a comparative look at the inter-American and the European Human Rights systems and to consider the comparative advantages, disadvantages and complementary potential of regional human rights systems and universal international human rights and criminal justice bodies. Cross Registration: This Course is open to graduate students across the university, with permission of the instructor. Preference for cross-registration by non-Law School students will be given to students enrolled in the Master of Arts program in Latin American Studies. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Short Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Winter 2018

LAW 5029: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives

(Formerly Law 675) This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, including trafficking for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ harvesting. In each of these areas, we will focus on human rights violations and remedies. The course aims to: 1. Provide the historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. 2. Analyze current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluate their practical implementation. 3. Examine the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. 4. Stimulate ideas for new interventions. Instruction will combine lectures and small group discussion, and uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should also enroll in History 6W/7W ( FemGen 6W/7W), a two-quarter service learning workshop. Elements used in grading: Attendance; participation; written assignments; and final exam. This class is cross-listed with Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies ( FEMGEN 5C, FEMGEN 105C), History ( HISTORY 5C, 105C), Human Biology ( HUMBIO 178T), International Relations ( INTNLREL 105C) & School of Medicine General ( SOMGEN 205).
Last offered: Winter 2017

LAW 5031: Law and Society in Late Imperial China

(Formerly Law 773) Connections between legal and social history. Ideology and practice, center and periphery, and state-society tensions and interactions. Readings introduce the work of major historians on concepts and problems in Ming-Qing history. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Chinese ( CHINA 392B) and History ( HISTORY 392B).
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 5033: International Justice

(Formerly Law 786) Mass atrocities---including genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity---continue to rage around the world, from Syria and South Sudan to Iraq and Myanmar. This course examines origins, operations, and outcomes of historical and contemporary international justice measures to address such heinous crimes. We will consider the full range of judicial, legislative, and executive "transitional justice" mechanisms available to policymakers as societies emerge from periods of violence and repression. These mechanisms include war crimes tribunals (such as the International Criminal Court), truth commissions, amnesties, lustration, exile, indefinite detention, lethal force, and inaction. The course draws on various case studies, including present-day Syria and Iraq, Rwanda and the Balkans in the 1990s, and World War II. Readings address the legal, political, and philosophical underpinnings of justice; questions of institutional design; and how different societies have more »
(Formerly Law 786) Mass atrocities---including genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity---continue to rage around the world, from Syria and South Sudan to Iraq and Myanmar. This course examines origins, operations, and outcomes of historical and contemporary international justice measures to address such heinous crimes. We will consider the full range of judicial, legislative, and executive "transitional justice" mechanisms available to policymakers as societies emerge from periods of violence and repression. These mechanisms include war crimes tribunals (such as the International Criminal Court), truth commissions, amnesties, lustration, exile, indefinite detention, lethal force, and inaction. The course draws on various case studies, including present-day Syria and Iraq, Rwanda and the Balkans in the 1990s, and World War II. Readings address the legal, political, and philosophical underpinnings of justice; questions of institutional design; and how different societies have balanced competing policy imperatives. Students may take the course for two or three units depending on the length of the paper. Students will receive Research credit for the seminar. This class is limited to 20 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (15 students will be selected by lottery) and five non-law students by consent of instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Last offered: Winter 2018

LAW 5034: Human Trafficking: Law and Policy

Taking an historical and comparative perspective, this course will introduce students to the international, domestic, foreign, and sub-national law governing the many manifestations of human trafficking (including legal prohibitions on forced labor and modern forms of slavery, sexual exploitation, organ trafficking, and child soldiering). We will also explore the diplomatic and policy tools employed by state and local governments to tackle this phenomenon. Class sessions will be comprised of a combination of lectures, seminar discussions, and guest speakers. Students have the option of completing a research paper or a take-home final exam. The first eight weeks of the course will coincide with the first eight weeks of winter quarter and will be conducted at Stanford Law School. Enrollment in the Thailand field study option is limited to 12 students (See Law 5035 for application instructions and deadline). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments; Final Exam, or Final Research Paper. Cross-listed with International Policy ( INTLPOL 356).
Last offered: Winter 2019
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