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231 - 240 of 471 results for: LAW

LAW 4010: Intellectual Property: Patents

In this course we cover the major aspects of patent law, primarily as applied in the United States: patentability (including patentable subject matter, novelty, nonobviousness, enablement, and definiteness); infringement; and remedies. The emphasis is on essential legal principles and a policy analysis of the patent system. The course is designed to be useful both as solid background for non-patent-specialists and for those planning a career in the field. Introduction to Intellectual Property or consent of the instructor is a prerequisite for this course. No technical background is required. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, and final exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 4011: Intellectual Property: The Business & Law of Technology & Patent Licensing

If you practice in any technology-related area (whether transactions, corporate, or litigation), you will encounter licensing, as it is the principal means by which technology and patent rights are disseminated, exploited and commercialized. It is fundamental to Silicon Valley and beyond, including in software, mobile, consumer devices, autonomous cars, semiconductors and pharmaceuticals. This is a practice-oriented course covering the fundamentals of licensing technology and patents, including business considerations, drafting, negotiations and strategic considerations. We will also consider the role of licensing in mergers and acquisitions, litigation and antitrust contexts. The course is structured based on a real-world hypothetical involving entrepreneurs who spin out university-developed inventions into startup companies and then seek to commercialize the technology and patents to leading companies in a specified technology industry (such as smartphones, autonomous cars, "internet of things" or the like). We will also have a guest lecturer from a major technology company with significant licensing dimensions (which in the past have included Google, Waymo, and Qualcomm). Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 4012: Intellectual Property: Trademark and Unfair Competition Law

This course will consider the protection and enforcement of trademarks and related state rights in brands and names, including the right of publicity. There is no prerequisite, though some students will have taken Introduction to Intellectual Property. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Exam (Open-book one-day take-home).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Lemley, M. (PI)

LAW 4013: Information Privacy Law

This course explores the roots of privacy law, its evolution in the face of rapid technological change, and the challenges to an individual's ability to control third party collection, access, use and disclosure of their personal information. The course covers existing and emerging privacy torts, applicable and proposed privacy legislation and regulations, international norms and extraterritorial application of privacy law such as in the EU's General Data Protection Regulation, and self-regulation of privacy through technological means, contracts or other means. We will discuss all of these things, as well as incorporate developments in the news, from the perspective of the various privacy stakeholders--consumers, regulators and business. Elements used in grading: Final Exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Gidari, A. (PI)

LAW 4014: Law, Technology, and Liberty

New technologies from gene editing to networked computing have already transformed our economic and social structures and are increasingly changing what it means to be human. What role has law played in regulating and shaping these technologies? And what role can and should it play in the future? This seminar will consider these and related questions, focusing on new forms of networked production, the new landscape of security and scarcity, and the meaning of human nature and ecology in an era of rapid technological change. Readings will be drawn from a range of disciplines, including science and engineering, political economy, and law. The course will feature several guest speakers. There are no formal prerequisites in either engineering or law, but students should be committed to pursuing novel questions in an interdisciplinary context. The enrollment goal is to balance the class composition between law and non-law students. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, more »
New technologies from gene editing to networked computing have already transformed our economic and social structures and are increasingly changing what it means to be human. What role has law played in regulating and shaping these technologies? And what role can and should it play in the future? This seminar will consider these and related questions, focusing on new forms of networked production, the new landscape of security and scarcity, and the meaning of human nature and ecology in an era of rapid technological change. Readings will be drawn from a range of disciplines, including science and engineering, political economy, and law. The course will feature several guest speakers. There are no formal prerequisites in either engineering or law, but students should be committed to pursuing novel questions in an interdisciplinary context. The enrollment goal is to balance the class composition between law and non-law students. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. This course is cross-listed with Bioengineering ( BIOE 242) and Engineering ( ENGR 243) .
Last offered: Winter 2017

LAW 4015: Modern Surveillance Law

This seminar provides an in depth look at modern government surveillance law, policies and practices. It is taught by Richard Salgado, director of law enforcement and information security at Google and a former prosecutor at the U.S. Department of Justice's Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section, and Todd Hinnen, a partner at Perkins Coie and a former head of U.S. Department of Justice's National Security Division. The course will cover the technology, law and policy of government surveillance of the Internet and other communications technologies. We will focus on U.S. government surveillance for national security, criminal law enforcement and public safety purposes, and its relationship with other jurisdictions. Technologies and practices covered will include wiretapping, stored data collection and mining, location tracking and developing eavesdropping techniques. Legal regimes will include the Fourth Amendment, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, the USA Freedom Act, USA Patriot Act, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the CLOUD Act and CALEA among others. Elements used in grading: Two papers, timely submission of topics and outlines, and class participation.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

LAW 4016: Patent Litigation Workshop

(Formerly Law 322) This course simulates the strategy and pretrial preparation of a patent lawsuit. The course materials include information typical to a patent lawsuit: a patent, file history, prior art, and information regarding the accused product. Students will represent either the patentee or the accused infringer. Students will draft claim construction charts, infringement charts, take and defend depositions, and brief and argue claim construction and motions for summary judgment of infringement and invalidity. Some knowledge of patent law is presumed. Special Instructions: IP: Patents ( Law 326) is a prerequisite for this course, but can be taken coterminously. Students must attend the first class session (or contact the instructor) or they will be dropped from the class or waitlist. Elements used in grading: Attendance, participation, writing assignments, exercises and oral arguments.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

LAW 4017: Advanced Torts: Defamation, Privacy, and Emotional Distress

This course will examine the theoretical foundations and common law development of the range of tort remedies designed to afford protection to the interests in personality. Defamation, the right of privacy, and claims of emotional distress and harassment will receive particular attention, along with the constitutional defenses to these claims, based on the First Amendment, and recent issues novel to the internet era. Elements used in grading: Final Exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Rabin, R. (PI)

LAW 4018: Intellectual Property: International and Comparative Copyright

All copyrights today are international, and copyright litigation and licensing increasingly require a general understanding of foreign copyright law and of the international copyright system. This course will focus on the counselling considerations that surround the exploitation of US-based music, film, literature, software and other copyrighted works in foreign markets, and of foreign works in US markets, through licensing, litigation, or both. The course will survey the principal legal systems and international treaty arrangements for the protection of copyrighted works as well as the procedural questions that lie at the threshold of protection. Elements used in grading: class participation and two problem sets, one mid-course and the other at the end of the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

LAW 4019: Legal Informatics

(Formerly Law 729) The management of information is crucial to the proper functioning of any legal system. A good legal system relies on information about the world itself (such as evidence of who did what and when) as well as more purely legal information (such as court rulings, statutes, contracts, and so forth). Legal Informatics is the theory and practice of managing such information. It covers both legal theory and information theory. It also covers elements of general information processing technology as well as applications of that technology in the administration of law. While the concept of Legal Informatics is not new, its importance is greater than ever due to recent technological advances - including progress on mechanized legal information processing, the growth of the Internet, and the proliferation of autonomous systems (such as self-driving cars and robots), as well as globalization of the legal industry. The upshot of these advances is the emergence of practical legal more »
(Formerly Law 729) The management of information is crucial to the proper functioning of any legal system. A good legal system relies on information about the world itself (such as evidence of who did what and when) as well as more purely legal information (such as court rulings, statutes, contracts, and so forth). Legal Informatics is the theory and practice of managing such information. It covers both legal theory and information theory. It also covers elements of general information processing technology as well as applications of that technology in the administration of law. While the concept of Legal Informatics is not new, its importance is greater than ever due to recent technological advances - including progress on mechanized legal information processing, the growth of the Internet, and the proliferation of autonomous systems (such as self-driving cars and robots), as well as globalization of the legal industry. The upshot of these advances is the emergence of practical legal technology that is qualitatively superior to what has gone before. This technology is capable of dramatically changing the legal profession, improving the quality and efficiency of legal services and disrupting the way law firms do business. The technology is also capable of popularizing the law - bringing legal understanding and legal tools to everyone in society, not just legal professionals. Through this class students gain an understanding of the unique challenges and opportunities the legal system and the legal industry are facing in light of this tech-driven transformation of our legal system, and learn about innovative new approaches seeking to address them. Particular attention will be given to Computational Law, the branch of Legal Informatics concerned with the mechanization of legal analysis. Expert guest-speakers from academia and industry will provide for a diverse and interdisciplinary experience. Successful legal technology entrepreneurs and thought leaders in the legal technology space will provide a practical angle to the discussion. Class sessions include: An introduction to legal informatics; Information Retrieval and Case Search, Document Creation / Expert Systems; Computational Law (Legislation & Regulation); Computable Contracts (Drafting and Negotiation); Unauthorized practice of law. Grading: Option 1 (section 01): Independent Research Paper (individual; 75% of grade). Students shall write an independent research paper on a legal informatics topic. You are invited to propose a topic and a working title and to discuss your topic ideas with us. The topic and the working title of the research paper must be approved by the instructors, before you start your detailed research. Independent research papers require by definition that students include other research materials besides the readings for class. Students electing option 1 will receive Research (R) credit. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the length of the research paper. If you wish to earn 2 units, the research paper shall be at least 18 pages in length (double-spaced, 12-point font size, 1-inch margins). If you wish to earn 3 units, the research paper shall be at least 26 pages in length (double-spaced, 12-point font size, 1-inch margins). You can find examples of papers written by last year¿s students on the CodeX website at https://law.stanford.edu/codex-the-stanford-center-for-legal-informatics/codex-publications/#slsnav-seminal-papers. Option 2 (section 02): Computational Law Lab (individual or group; 75% of grade). Students can identify a legal information problem and develop a computational law system, individually or as part of a team, to address the problem by preparing a technical demonstration project/prototype and in form of a written report about the project. Students can build their own system using Neota Logic, ( https://www.neotalogic.com/), Stanford's Worksheets system ( http://worksheets.stanford.edu) or another technology stack that is suitable to the project at hand (to be discussed with instructors). Each student can choose one of the above two options, whichever he/she prefers. After the term begins, students electing option 2 can transfer from section (01) into section (02), with consent of the instructor. During the course, students will be asked to provide a brief description of their project. There are no prerequisites for this class. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Legal Technology Project, Research Paper. Cross-listed with Computer Science ( CS 204).
Last offered: Spring 2019
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