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211 - 220 of 460 results for: LAW

LAW 3519: Law and the Greek Classics (Reading Group)

This one credit course, based on materials taught at the Aspen Institute, will read and discuss selected classical Greek documents (in translation, of course) of particular relevance to the contemporary practice of law. We will begin with a reading of two Platonic dialogues -- Crito and the Apologia -- to frame the question of whether Socrates should have resisted the lawful, but unjust, verdict condemning him to death. We'll focus of the tension between law and justice, perhaps peeking forward to Melville's Billy Budd, and MLK Jr.'s Letter from the Birmingham Jail. We will continue with the third play in Aeschylus' Oresteia, focusing on the decision to remit Orestes to the judgment of the people of Athens, rather than to the Furies, in connection with the murder of Clytemnestra. We'll focus on the decision to vest secular authorities with the definition of justice. We'll close with a reading of Antigone, focusing on the relationship between the individual and the state, and the gender more »
This one credit course, based on materials taught at the Aspen Institute, will read and discuss selected classical Greek documents (in translation, of course) of particular relevance to the contemporary practice of law. We will begin with a reading of two Platonic dialogues -- Crito and the Apologia -- to frame the question of whether Socrates should have resisted the lawful, but unjust, verdict condemning him to death. We'll focus of the tension between law and justice, perhaps peeking forward to Melville's Billy Budd, and MLK Jr.'s Letter from the Birmingham Jail. We will continue with the third play in Aeschylus' Oresteia, focusing on the decision to remit Orestes to the judgment of the people of Athens, rather than to the Furies, in connection with the murder of Clytemnestra. We'll focus on the decision to vest secular authorities with the definition of justice. We'll close with a reading of Antigone, focusing on the relationship between the individual and the state, and the gendered nature of justice. I often end the seminar with an informal public reading of the Antigone. I play Creon, maybe this year in a Trump mask. I anticipate five meetings, usually over dinner in one of the seminar rooms. Class will meet five Wednesdays, 6:15PM-8:15pm, April 11, April 25, May 9, May 23, May 30. Discussion will be informal, and non-hierarchical. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation.
Last offered: Spring 2018

LAW 3520: Selected Topics in the History of Capitalism, Regulation, Corporations and Finance

This seminar will briefly examine recent debates about the role of the financial sector in the United States, considered in light of the long history of American debates over regulation of economic activity. It will be structured as a continuing dialogue between recent debates about regulation and finance, and historical debates over the role of law in capitalist development. It will touch upon the regulation of corporations, banking and the financial system, movements for deregulation in the 1970s, 80s and 90s, the roots of the financial crisis of 2007-08, and its aftermath up to the present day. The seminar will be structured as a short and necessarily tentative (given the time constraints of the course) examination of the social, institutional and intellectual history of economic regulation, as a means of contextualizing our continuing and unresolved arguments over scope and purpose of corporations and the financial sector. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation. Class meets 7:15 p.m. - 9:15 p.m., January 9, 10, 14, 16, and 17.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 4001: Communications Law: Broadcast and Cable Television

(Formerly Law 447) Most people watch television on a regular basis (although not necessarily on TV). Television entertains, delivers the news, and provides an important forum for debating political issues. Focusing on communications law and first amendment law, the course will discuss how and why regulation shapes what we see on TV, and how it attempts to ensure that television can fulfill its functions for society. For example, why is cable television so expensive? Why can comedians swear on cable TV, but not on broadcast TV? Should regulators care as much about violence as they do about indecency? Can we trust the market to give the audience what it wants? Will the market provide content that is in the public interest, such as local news or educational programming, or do regulators need to intervene? Should we care if media outlets are increasingly owned by a few small conglomerates? And how does the Internet affect the need for ownership regulation? The course mostly focuses on the more »
(Formerly Law 447) Most people watch television on a regular basis (although not necessarily on TV). Television entertains, delivers the news, and provides an important forum for debating political issues. Focusing on communications law and first amendment law, the course will discuss how and why regulation shapes what we see on TV, and how it attempts to ensure that television can fulfill its functions for society. For example, why is cable television so expensive? Why can comedians swear on cable TV, but not on broadcast TV? Should regulators care as much about violence as they do about indecency? Can we trust the market to give the audience what it wants? Will the market provide content that is in the public interest, such as local news or educational programming, or do regulators need to intervene? Should we care if media outlets are increasingly owned by a few small conglomerates? And how does the Internet affect the need for ownership regulation? The course mostly focuses on the U.S., but highlights developments elsewhere where appropriate. Special instructions: Students may take Communications Law: Internet and Telephony and Communications Law: Broadcast and Cable Television in any order (neither is a prerequisite for the other). There are no prerequisites for this course. No technical background is required. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, final exam.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 4003: Current Issues in Network Neutrality

(Formerly Law 731) Due to the change in administration, the future of net neutrality in the US is in question again. Network neutrality rules are based on a simple principle: Internet service providers like Verizon or Comcast that connect us to the Internet should not control what happens on the Internet. Net neutrality rules prohibit ISPs from blocking or slowing down websites, making some sites more attractive than others, or charging sites fees to reach people faster. After a long, public fight that mobilized more than 4 million people across the political spectrum, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) adopted strong net neutrality rules in February 2015. Now these rules might be on the chopping block. FCC Chairman Pai, who opposed the rules when they were adopted, has declared his intention to roll back the rules, while expressing some support for "net neutrality principles." At the same time, Republicans in Congress have indicated they might consider a legislative solution more »
(Formerly Law 731) Due to the change in administration, the future of net neutrality in the US is in question again. Network neutrality rules are based on a simple principle: Internet service providers like Verizon or Comcast that connect us to the Internet should not control what happens on the Internet. Net neutrality rules prohibit ISPs from blocking or slowing down websites, making some sites more attractive than others, or charging sites fees to reach people faster. After a long, public fight that mobilized more than 4 million people across the political spectrum, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) adopted strong net neutrality rules in February 2015. Now these rules might be on the chopping block. FCC Chairman Pai, who opposed the rules when they were adopted, has declared his intention to roll back the rules, while expressing some support for "net neutrality principles." At the same time, Republicans in Congress have indicated they might consider a legislative solution. Through lectures, class discussions, and guest speakers, the seminar will introduce students to the key questions underlying the net neutrality debate so that they can become informed participants in this debate. Do we need net neutrality rules, and, if yes, what should they be? What are the options for addressing net neutrality at the FCC and in Congress? How do past court decisions constrain the FCC's options for adopting net neutrality rules? While the class focuses on the net neutrality debate in the U.S., the underlying policy questions are general and directly applicable to ongoing net neutrality debates around the world. The class is open to law students and students from other parts of the university. Students do not need to have any technical background to participate in the class; any necessary background will be taught in class. Elements used in grading: Short written assignments, class participation, attendance. Students are expected to attend all sessions of the class and participate in the class discussion. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Spring 2019

LAW 4004: Cybersecurity: A Legal and Technical Perspective

This class will use the case method to teach basic computer, network, and information security from technology, law, policy, and business perspectives. Using real world topics, we will study the technical, legal, policy, and business aspects of an incident or issue and its potential solutions. The case studies will be organized around the following topics: vulnerability disclosure, state sponsored sabotage, corporate and government espionage, credit card theft, theft of embarrassing personal data, phishing and social engineering attacks, denial of service attacks, attacks on weak session management and URLs, security risks and benefits of cloud data storage, wiretapping on the Internet, and digital forensics. Students taking the class will learn about the techniques attackers use, applicable legal prohibitions, rights, and remedies, the policy context, and strategies in law, policy and business for managing risk. Grades will be based on class participation, two reflection papers, and a more »
This class will use the case method to teach basic computer, network, and information security from technology, law, policy, and business perspectives. Using real world topics, we will study the technical, legal, policy, and business aspects of an incident or issue and its potential solutions. The case studies will be organized around the following topics: vulnerability disclosure, state sponsored sabotage, corporate and government espionage, credit card theft, theft of embarrassing personal data, phishing and social engineering attacks, denial of service attacks, attacks on weak session management and URLs, security risks and benefits of cloud data storage, wiretapping on the Internet, and digital forensics. Students taking the class will learn about the techniques attackers use, applicable legal prohibitions, rights, and remedies, the policy context, and strategies in law, policy and business for managing risk. Grades will be based on class participation, two reflection papers, and a final exam. Special Instructions: This class is limited to 65 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (30 students will be selected by lottery) and students from Computer Science (30 students) and International Policy Studies (5 students). Elements used in grading: Class Participation (20%), Written Assignments (40%), Final Exam (40%). Cross-listed with Computer Science ( CS 203) and International Policy Studies ( IPS 251).
Last offered: Spring 2018

LAW 4005: Introduction to Intellectual Property

This is an overview course covering the basics of intellectual property law -- trade secrets, patents, copyrights, and trademarks. This course is designed both for those who are interested in pursuing IP as a career, and those who are looking only for a basic knowledge of the subject. There are no prerequisites, and a scientific background is not required. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Lemley, M. (PI)

LAW 4005: Introduction to Intellectual Property

This is an overview course covering the basics of intellectual property law -- trade secrets, patents, copyrights, and trademarks, as well as selected other state intellectual property rights. This course is designed both for those who are interested in pursuing IP as a career, and those who are looking only for a basic knowledge of the subject. There are no prerequisites, and a scientific background is not required. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam (4-hour, open-book, in-class final).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

LAW 4006: Intellectual Property and Antitrust Law

(Formerly Law 459) This is an advanced seminar focusing on antitrust law as it applies to the creation, licensing, and exercise of intellectual property rights. At least one IP or antitrust class is a prerequisite, and ideally both. Papers will be due before the Law School deadline. Draft papers will be due in time for student presentations. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements use in grading: Class participation and final paper.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 4007: Intellectual Property: Copyright

Copyright law is the engine that drives not only such traditional entertainment and information industries as music, book publishing, news and motion pictures, but also software, video games and other digital products. This course examines in depth all aspects of copyright law and practice, as well as the business and policy challenges and opportunities that the Internet and other new technologies present for the exploitation of copyrighted works. There are no prerequisites for this class. Elements used in grading: Final Exam (In-School, open book).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 4008: Intellectual Property: Copyright Licensing, Principles, Law and Practice

(Formerly Law 625) This course will combine in-depth study, through reading assignments and lectures, of US law governing copyright transactions (contract formalities and construction; recordation and title practice; termination of transfers) and copyright contract drafting and negotiation exercises (book publishing agreement; videogame production and distribution agreement). Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Winter 2017
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