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201 - 210 of 461 results for: LAW

LAW 3506: Law and Empire in U.S. History

This course will examine the interrelationship between legal norms and empire in the history of the United States. Topics in this part will include the Constitution as an imperial document; law and the expansion of the United States in western North America, Puerto Rico, and Hawaii; the Insular Cases; and current debates over extraterritoriality and the War on Terror. Substantial readings will consist of scholarly articles, historical cases, and primary sources, and will be provided online. Requirements for the course include regular class participation and, at the students' election, either response papers or a historiographical essay. Students may also elect to complete a research paper, in which case they will receive 3 units and "R" credit. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Cross-listed with History ( HISTORY 354F).
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Ablavsky, G. (PI)

LAW 3507: Law and the Rhetorical Tradition

In this interdisciplinary seminar we explore the rhetorical underpinnings of legal argument. In the first half of the course, we acquaint ourselves with relevant elements of the rhetorical tradition. In the second half, we analyze a variety of legal texts (both written and oral) with an eye to the use and function of rhetorical principles, as well as the ways form and content are mutually constitutive. This course aims both to increase students' understanding of rhetoric as readers and interpreters of legal texts and to develop students' skills as writers and speakers. Students are be expected to participate in class discussion in addition to completing a series of writing assignments including the rhetorical analysis of legal and non-legal texts and the revision of students' legal writing. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, assignments, final paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Special Instructions: This course can satisfy the Research "R" requ more »
In this interdisciplinary seminar we explore the rhetorical underpinnings of legal argument. In the first half of the course, we acquaint ourselves with relevant elements of the rhetorical tradition. In the second half, we analyze a variety of legal texts (both written and oral) with an eye to the use and function of rhetorical principles, as well as the ways form and content are mutually constitutive. This course aims both to increase students' understanding of rhetoric as readers and interpreters of legal texts and to develop students' skills as writers and speakers. Students are be expected to participate in class discussion in addition to completing a series of writing assignments including the rhetorical analysis of legal and non-legal texts and the revision of students' legal writing. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, assignments, final paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Special Instructions: This course can satisfy the Research "R" requirement. The instructor and the student must agree whether the student will receive "R" credit. For "R" credit, the paper is substantial and is based on independent research. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 3508: Law and Visual Culture

We know it when we see it. But what kind of knowledge does a smartphone or dashboard camera video offer? We tend to treat certain kinds of video as unmediated representations of reality, even though as sophisticated consumers of media we should know better. Neuroscience, empirical research, and cultural theory all refute this so-called reality effect. But the desire that drives it--the desire for definitive proof of what did or did not happen--arises from very real experience, and is inextricably connected to the legal process. This seminar tracks the legal reception of modern visual representation from confusion about the admissibility of photographs in the late 19th century (is it like a drawing? is it like eyewitness testimony?) to the debate about cameras in the courtroom in the late 20th century (do judges and jurors decide differently when the proceedings are subject to public scrutiny?) to the frequent and strategic deployment of visual media in pretrial and litigation practice more »
We know it when we see it. But what kind of knowledge does a smartphone or dashboard camera video offer? We tend to treat certain kinds of video as unmediated representations of reality, even though as sophisticated consumers of media we should know better. Neuroscience, empirical research, and cultural theory all refute this so-called reality effect. But the desire that drives it--the desire for definitive proof of what did or did not happen--arises from very real experience, and is inextricably connected to the legal process. This seminar tracks the legal reception of modern visual representation from confusion about the admissibility of photographs in the late 19th century (is it like a drawing? is it like eyewitness testimony?) to the debate about cameras in the courtroom in the late 20th century (do judges and jurors decide differently when the proceedings are subject to public scrutiny?) to the frequent and strategic deployment of visual media in pretrial and litigation practice today. We will also explore the prominent role of video in today's conversation about policing and race. Course materials range from judicial opinions to film theory to social psychology to presentations by practicing attorneys. Special Instructions: This course can satisfy the Research "R" requirement. The instructor and the student must agree whether the student will receive "R" credit. For "R" credit, the paper is substantial and is based on independent research. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements Used in Grading: Class Participation. Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 3510: Psychological Development: Myth, Law, and Practice

Collective myths from a variety of traditions and cultures capture enduring psychological truths about human choices and the human condition. Lawyers at various stages in their careers have their own personal myths, sometimes conscious and sometimes not. These personal myths embody key tendencies that determine or heavily influence each lawyer's personal and professional path. This course uses some salient collective myths as well as modern psychological material to create a powerful backdrop for self-examination and self-development. It offers a space and time for each student to consider his or her own personal and professional direction through the course materials, class interactions, and a series of reflection papers. The course benefits from the collaboration of Ron Tyler, Director of the Criminal Defense Clinic, who will conduct a session focusing on mindfulness practices. Elements used in grading: A series of reflection papers totaling at least 18-pages.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Strnad, J. (PI)

LAW 3511: Writing Workshop: Law and Creativity

Practicing law is very much a creative enterprise. Effective advocates and counselors provide innovative and thoughtful solutions to complex problems. But there often isn't enough attention devoted in law school either to thinking creatively or to reflecting in a creative way on the issues students confront inside and outside the classroom. This course will respond to this gap by building a bridge between law and the arts, with the goal of helping students hone their ability to think creatively and use disciplined imagination. Law & Creativity will meet twice a week and have dual components designed to inform one another. The first session will be structured as a seminar in which students gather to examine and discuss creative treatments of legal and professional issues in a variety of media (including film, fiction, and nonfiction). The second session will follow the creative-writing workshop model in which students submit their own fiction and creative nonfiction pieces for group discussion. Through the workshop process, students will develop the skills necessary to constructively critique and workshop one another's work, and learn a variety of techniques for improving their own creative writing. Elements used in grading: Class attendance, participation and final paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Canales, V. (PI)

LAW 3512: Markets, Morals and the Law

What things should or should not be for sale - and why? This course will consider several examples of "blocked exchanges" or "contested commodities," including the trade in reproductive services, body parts, environmental resources, political rights and obligations, and the varieties of human labor. With readings drawn from law, philosophy, and moral and political economy, the purpose of the course will be to examine a range of contemporary controversies over commodification and to consider arguments about the appropriate scope and limits of market activity. The assigned reading will be substantial, varied, and demanding. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Winter 2017

LAW 3514: Law and Inequality (Reading Group)

This reading group will focus on the challenges presented to law by the long-term growth of economic inequality. In addition to exploring evidence of rising inequality (including the work of Thomas Piketty and others), we will examine legal and other scholarship that seeks to understand law's contribution to inequality and legal responses that might reduce inequality or ameliorate its effects. Meeting Time: Class will meet 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM, April 10, April 17, May 1, May 15, and May 22. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation.
Last offered: Spring 2018

LAW 3515: Law and Humanities Workshop: History, Literature, and Philosophy

(Formerly Law 516) The Law and Humanities Workshop: History, Literature, and Philosophy is designed as a forum in which faculty and students from the Law School and from various humanities departments can discuss some of the best work now being done in law and humanities. Every other week, an invited speaker will present his or her current research for discussion. In the week prior to a given speaker's presentation, the class will meet as a group to discuss secondary literature relevant to understanding and critiquing the speaker's research. Students will then read the speaker's paper in advance of the following week's workshop presentation. Students have two options. Those taking the course for 2 units are required to write a brief response to each speaker's paper. There will be a total of four speakers, and thus four papers. Guidance will be provided concerning how to frame these response papers, which will be due every two weeks - i.e., on the day before the speaker presents. Stude more »
(Formerly Law 516) The Law and Humanities Workshop: History, Literature, and Philosophy is designed as a forum in which faculty and students from the Law School and from various humanities departments can discuss some of the best work now being done in law and humanities. Every other week, an invited speaker will present his or her current research for discussion. In the week prior to a given speaker's presentation, the class will meet as a group to discuss secondary literature relevant to understanding and critiquing the speaker's research. Students will then read the speaker's paper in advance of the following week's workshop presentation. Students have two options. Those taking the course for 2 units are required to write a brief response to each speaker's paper. There will be a total of four speakers, and thus four papers. Guidance will be provided concerning how to frame these response papers, which will be due every two weeks - i.e., on the day before the speaker presents. Students taking the course for 3 units are required to write a research paper on a law and humanities topic that they choose (in consultation with the professors). Law students who complete this 3-unit track will receive an "R" credit. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Enrollment will be limited to 30 students -- 20 from SLS who will be selected by lottery and 10 from H&S. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, and writing assignments. Cross-listed with the Department of History (HIST 308F).
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 3516: Legal History Workshop

The Legal History Workshop is designed as a forum in which faculty and students from the Law School, the History Department, and elsewhere in the university can discuss some of the best work now being done in the field of legal history. Every other week, an invited speaker will present his or her current research for discussion. In the week prior to a given speaker's presentation, the class will meet as a group to discuss secondary literature relevant to understanding and critiquing the speaker's research. Students will then read the speaker's paper in advance of the following week's workshop presentation. Special Instructions: Students may choose to enroll in one of two sections of the course. In the first, students must write brief responses to each speaker's paper. There will be a total of four speakers, and thus four papers. Guidance will be provided concerning how to frame these response papers, which will be due every two weeks - i.e., on the day before speaker presents. In the s more »
The Legal History Workshop is designed as a forum in which faculty and students from the Law School, the History Department, and elsewhere in the university can discuss some of the best work now being done in the field of legal history. Every other week, an invited speaker will present his or her current research for discussion. In the week prior to a given speaker's presentation, the class will meet as a group to discuss secondary literature relevant to understanding and critiquing the speaker's research. Students will then read the speaker's paper in advance of the following week's workshop presentation. Special Instructions: Students may choose to enroll in one of two sections of the course. In the first, students must write brief responses to each speaker's paper. There will be a total of four speakers, and thus four papers. Guidance will be provided concerning how to frame these response papers, which will be due every two weeks - i.e., on the day before speaker presents. In the second section, students must write a research paper on a legal history topic that they select in consultation with the professors. Students opting to write a research paper will receive an "R" credit. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the paper length. Enrollment will be limited to 30 students -- 20 from SLS who will be selected by lottery and 10 from H&S. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, assignments and final paper. Cross-listed with History ( HISTORY 307A).
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

LAW 3517: Law and Literature

After its heyday in the 1970s and 1980s, many wondered whether the law and literature movement would retain vitality. Within the last decade there has, however, been an explosion of energy in the field, which has expanded beyond the boundaries of the literary text narrowly conceived and incorporated a range of other genres and humanistic approaches. Several recent or forthcoming books survey the range of emerging scholarship and the potential for new directions within the field. Using one of these--New Directions in Law and Literature (Oxford, 2017)--as a guide, this course will delve into a variety of topics that law and literature approaches can illuminate. These include, among others, conceptions of sovereignty and non-sovereign collectivities, the construction of the citizen and refugee, competing visions of marriage and its alternatives, law and the rhetorical tradition, and theoretical perspectives on intellectual property. Nearly every session will pair recent scholarship in the more »
After its heyday in the 1970s and 1980s, many wondered whether the law and literature movement would retain vitality. Within the last decade there has, however, been an explosion of energy in the field, which has expanded beyond the boundaries of the literary text narrowly conceived and incorporated a range of other genres and humanistic approaches. Several recent or forthcoming books survey the range of emerging scholarship and the potential for new directions within the field. Using one of these--New Directions in Law and Literature (Oxford, 2017)--as a guide, this course will delve into a variety of topics that law and literature approaches can illuminate. These include, among others, conceptions of sovereignty and non-sovereign collectivities, the construction of the citizen and refugee, competing visions of marriage and its alternatives, law and the rhetorical tradition, and theoretical perspectives on intellectual property. Nearly every session will pair recent scholarship in the field with a literary or artistic work, ranging from Claudia Rankine's Citizen to Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 3 or 4 units, depending on the paper length. This class is limited to 22 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (16 students will be selected by lottery) and six non-law students by consent of instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with English ( ENGLISH 350).
Last offered: Spring 2018
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