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21 - 30 of 471 results for: LAW

LAW 240L: Discussion (1L): Robot Ethics

We will consider the developing legal and ethical problems of robots and artificial intelligence (AI), particularly self-directed and learning AIs. How do self-driving cars (or autonomous weapons systems) value human lives? How do we trade off accuracy against other values in predictive algorithms? At what point should we consider AIs autonomous entities with their own rights and responsibilities? And how can courts and legislatures set legal rules robots can understand and obey? This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Lemley, M. (PI)

LAW 240M: Discussion (1L): The Central Park Five Case

This discussion seminar will focus on racial factors in the criminal justice system, using the Central Park 5 case and the Netflix series "When They See Us" as the jumping off point for the discussion. Following each episode of the series, the seminar will discuss the investigation, the trial, incarceration and post incarceration experiences. Although there may be some readings, the primary material will be the Netflix series. I hope to have some additional help with the discussion by asking a few outside players to join the class. Participants could include George Gascon, the San Francisco District Attorney who has been a leader in the investigation of racism in enforcement of the laws, Linda Farstein, the main prosecutor in the case who was the Chief of the New York DA's sex crimes unit, and one of the Three Strikers whose release was secured by Stanford's Three Strike Project. If they are available, these outside participants will join the discussion in order to be a resource and to more »
This discussion seminar will focus on racial factors in the criminal justice system, using the Central Park 5 case and the Netflix series "When They See Us" as the jumping off point for the discussion. Following each episode of the series, the seminar will discuss the investigation, the trial, incarceration and post incarceration experiences. Although there may be some readings, the primary material will be the Netflix series. I hope to have some additional help with the discussion by asking a few outside players to join the class. Participants could include George Gascon, the San Francisco District Attorney who has been a leader in the investigation of racism in enforcement of the laws, Linda Farstein, the main prosecutor in the case who was the Chief of the New York DA's sex crimes unit, and one of the Three Strikers whose release was secured by Stanford's Three Strike Project. If they are available, these outside participants will join the discussion in order to be a resource and to provide color and insight into the topics being covered. Note: This seminar will meet in San Francisco and transportation will be provided. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Mills, D. (PI)

LAW 240N: Discussion (1L): Theories and Critiques of Legal Education

Much of the basic structure of twenty-first-century American legal education was put in place by late nineteenth-century Harvard Law School Dean Christopher Columbus Langdell. This seminar will begin by examining the impetus for and nature of Langdell's reforms then consider various twentieth- and twenty-first-century critiques and modifications of legal education, including Duncan Kennedy's Legal Education and the Reproduction of Hierarchy and the work of critical race theorists like Patricia Williams and Lani Guinier. We will conclude by examining the most significant change within law schools over the past century, the rise of clinical legal education, reading parts of the Carnegie Report on Legal Education and Sam Moyn's recent critique of clinical education as well as a range of responses to his piece. Throughout the seminar, we will pay attention to the historical and social contexts out of which proposals for changing legal education arose as well as to how we might assess the c more »
Much of the basic structure of twenty-first-century American legal education was put in place by late nineteenth-century Harvard Law School Dean Christopher Columbus Langdell. This seminar will begin by examining the impetus for and nature of Langdell's reforms then consider various twentieth- and twenty-first-century critiques and modifications of legal education, including Duncan Kennedy's Legal Education and the Reproduction of Hierarchy and the work of critical race theorists like Patricia Williams and Lani Guinier. We will conclude by examining the most significant change within law schools over the past century, the rise of clinical legal education, reading parts of the Carnegie Report on Legal Education and Sam Moyn's recent critique of clinical education as well as a range of responses to his piece. Throughout the seminar, we will pay attention to the historical and social contexts out of which proposals for changing legal education arose as well as to how we might assess the contemporary structure of legal education in light of its history. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Meyler, B. (PI)

LAW 240O: Discussion (1L): Whose Justice? Which Rationality?

Reasonable people sometimes disagree. How can reflective individuals hope to evaluate those disagreements? Fundamental notions of justice and rationality seem to dominate particular traditions in different places and different times. How can a twenty-first century product of American or other cultures decide which of various compelling ideas of justice and rationality is most persuasive to us? How can anyone escape the accidents of birth and tribal worldview? We will approach these questions through Alastair MacIntyre's provocative book of that name: Whose Justice? Which Rationality? (Univ. Of Notre Dame Press 1988). Whether or not MacIntyre¿s neo-Aristotelian approach to the fundamental questions of ethical theory ultimately prove persuasive, his attempt to find alternatives to the utilitarian and Kantian relics of the Enlightenment will, I hope, open a conversation about what we believe and why. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

LAW 400: Directed Research

Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. Directed research credit may not be awarded for work that duplicates the work of a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has registered. Directed research credit may be awarded for work that expands on work initially assigned in, or conceived during, a course, clinic, or externship, but only if the continued work represents a meaningful and substantial contribution to the already existing project, significantly beyond mere editing or polishing. If a student seeks to continue or expand on work that the student initiated previously (whether for a course, clinic, externship, or otherwise) a student must (1) share the initial work with the professor supervising the directed research, to the extent that work is non-privileged, and (2) obtain permission for the expansion from the instructor or supervisor who supervised the initial project. The final pro more »
Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. Directed research credit may not be awarded for work that duplicates the work of a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has registered. Directed research credit may be awarded for work that expands on work initially assigned in, or conceived during, a course, clinic, or externship, but only if the continued work represents a meaningful and substantial contribution to the already existing project, significantly beyond mere editing or polishing. If a student seeks to continue or expand on work that the student initiated previously (whether for a course, clinic, externship, or otherwise) a student must (1) share the initial work with the professor supervising the directed research, to the extent that work is non-privileged, and (2) obtain permission for the expansion from the instructor or supervisor who supervised the initial project. The final product must be embodied in a paper or other form of written work involving a substantial independent effort on the part of the student. A student must submit a detailed petition of at least 250 words, approved by the sponsoring faculty member, outlining his or her proposed project and demonstrating that the research is likely to result in a significant scholarly contribution. A student may petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development" when the work involves assisting a Law School faculty member in developing concepts or materials for new and innovative law school courses. Both the supervising faculty member and the Associate Dean for Curriculum must approve petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development." Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. Students whose projects warrant more than four units should consider a Senior Thesis or the Research Track (See SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations). With the approval of the instructor, successful completion of a directed research project of two units or more may satisfy the JD writing requirement to the extent of one research writing course (R course). See Directed Research under Curricular Options in the SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations. Directed Research petitions are available on the Law School Registrar's Office website (see Forms and Petitions). Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 403: Senior Thesis

An opportunity for third-year students to engage in original research and to prepare a substantial written-work product on the scale of a law review article. The thesis topic should be chosen no later than two weeks after the beginning of the seventh term of law study and may be chosen during the sixth term. The topic is subject to the approval of the thesis supervisor, who may be any member of the Law School faculty under whose direction the student wishes to write the thesis and who is willing to assume the responsibility therefor. An oral defense of the thesis before members of the faculty, including the thesis supervisor, will be conducted late in the student's ninth academic term. Acceptance of the thesis for credit requires the approval of the thesis supervisor and one or more other members of the faculty who will be selected by the supervisor. Satisfactory completion of the senior thesis will satisfy graduation requirements to the extent of (a) 5 - 8 units of credit and (b) two research courses. The exact requirements for a senior thesis are in the discretion of the supervising faculty member. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5-8 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 406: Research Track

The Research Track is for students who wish to carry out a research project of a scope larger than that contemplated for a Senior Thesis. Research Track projects are to be supervised by two or more professors, at least one of whom must be a member of the Law School faculty. At least one faculty member in addition to the supervisors must read the written product of the research, and the student must defend the written work orally before the readers. Students will be admitted to Research Track only if they have a demonstrated capability for substantial independent research, and propose a significant and well-formulated project at the time of application. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-12 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 411: Directed Professional Writing

Directed professional writing projects involve professional writing, such as motions, briefs, proposed legislation, and congressional testimony, undertaken with the assistance of --- and in collaboration with --- a faculty member. Directed professional writing credit is designed to allow a student, or a small group of students working together, to receive academic credit for their work tackling real-world problems. Only projects supervised by a member of the faculty (tenured, tenure-track, senior lecturer, or professor from practice) may qualify for Directed Professional Writing credit. It will not necessarily be appropriate to require each member of the team to write the number of pages that would be required for an individual directed research project earning the number of units that each team member will earn for the team project. The page length guidelines applicable to individual papers may be considered in determining the appropriate page length, but the faculty supervisor has di more »
Directed professional writing projects involve professional writing, such as motions, briefs, proposed legislation, and congressional testimony, undertaken with the assistance of --- and in collaboration with --- a faculty member. Directed professional writing credit is designed to allow a student, or a small group of students working together, to receive academic credit for their work tackling real-world problems. Only projects supervised by a member of the faculty (tenured, tenure-track, senior lecturer, or professor from practice) may qualify for Directed Professional Writing credit. It will not necessarily be appropriate to require each member of the team to write the number of pages that would be required for an individual directed research project earning the number of units that each team member will earn for the team project. The page length guidelines applicable to individual papers may be considered in determining the appropriate page length, but the faculty supervisor has discretion to make the final page-length determination. Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. A petition will not be approved for work assigned or performed in a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has or will receive credit. See Directed Professional Writing under Curricular Options in the SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations. Directed Professional Writing petitions are available on the Law School Registrar's Office website (see Forms and Petitions). Elements used in grading: As agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 801: TGR: Project

Last offered: Summer 2017 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 802: TGR: Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit
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