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181 - 190 of 460 results for: LAW

LAW 2520: Climate Law and Policy

This course offers an interdisciplinary, graduate-level survey of current and historical efforts to regulate emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States and around the world. Students will read primary legal documents--including statutes, regulations, and court cases--in order to evaluate the forces and institutions shaping American climate policy. Additional perspectives from climate science, economics, and political science will provide context as students analyze the evolution of climate law and policy regimes. Elements used in grading: Grades will be based on class attendance, class participation, and either written assignments and an exam (section 01) or a final paper (section 02). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Cross-listed with Environment and Resources ( ENVRES 222).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

LAW 2521: California's Water Policy and Management: Toward a Sustainable Future

This seminar series focuses on the dramatic changes in recent decades in California water policy and management and how water researchers can help forge modern, collaborative solutions that will allow the state to adapt to an uncertain and challenging future. The seminar will meet six times during the Spring Quarter. The heart of the series will include four seminars with panels of outside experts covering the following topics: 1) The diversification of California's water supply portfolio; 2) The rise of the coequal goals of ecosystem restoration and water supply reliability; 3) The ongoing tension between collaborative and adversarial decision-making processes; and 4) Implications for water researchers seeking to help define pathways to meaningful solutions. In addition to these four seminar sessions, there will be an introductory California Water 101 session for students and a closing session on what we have learned. Students will be assigned readings and required to develop question more »
This seminar series focuses on the dramatic changes in recent decades in California water policy and management and how water researchers can help forge modern, collaborative solutions that will allow the state to adapt to an uncertain and challenging future. The seminar will meet six times during the Spring Quarter. The heart of the series will include four seminars with panels of outside experts covering the following topics: 1) The diversification of California's water supply portfolio; 2) The rise of the coequal goals of ecosystem restoration and water supply reliability; 3) The ongoing tension between collaborative and adversarial decision-making processes; and 4) Implications for water researchers seeking to help define pathways to meaningful solutions. In addition to these four seminar sessions, there will be an introductory California Water 101 session for students and a closing session on what we have learned. Students will be assigned readings and required to develop questions for discussion. Lead instructor for the seminar will be Landreth Visiting Fellow Dr. Timothy Quinn. Dr. Quinn spent more than ten years as the executive director of the Association of California Water Agencies, and more than twenty years as the Deputy General Manager of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Over the course of that career, he was at the center of every major water management issue facing the state of California, including the state's use of Colorado River water, management of the Bay Delta, and sustainable groundwater management. This class will meet the first five weeks of the quarter. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. Cross-listed with Civil & Environmental Engineering ( CEE 266E).
Last offered: Spring 2019

LAW 2522: Informal Environmental Governance

Informal environmental regulations (e.g., eco-certifications, CSR initiatives, supplier contracts) have become an increasingly important source of governance. But how do they work--how do they arise, and how are they enforced? Why do corporations participate? Are corporations legally allowed to participate, if these voluntary efforts reduce profits? This interdisciplinary seminar examines these questions and more, with readings from traditional legal sources (cases, agreements), as well as from social psychology, economics, and political science. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, written assignments.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Kim, H. (PI)

LAW 2523: Climate, Energy, and Democracy

This 1-credit, discussion-based seminar will examine the challenge and promise of responding to climate change in democracy. Combining theoretical readings and real-world examples such as California community choice energy programs and the movement for a Green New Deal, we will explore questions including: To transform our fossil-fuel based economy, do we need more democracy or less democracy, and what practically does either of those things mean? What makes federal climate change legislation so hard to achieve? In contrast, why have many sub-federal communities been successful in adopting climate change policies, and what are the benefits and limitations of these local actions? Grades will be based on a series of short reaction papers and class participation. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. This class will meet 4:15-7:15pm on Mondays - April 20, April 27, and May 4.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

LAW 3001: Health Law: Finance and Insurance

This course provides the legal, institutional, and economic background necessary to understand the financing and production of health services in the U.S. We will discuss the Affordable Care Act , health insurance (Medicare and Medicaid, employer-sponsored insurance, the uninsured), the approval process and IP protection for pharmaceuticals, and antitrust policy. We may discuss obesity and wellness, regulation of fraud and abuse, and medical malpractice. The syllabus for this course can be found at https://syllabus.stanford.edu. Cross-listed with Graduate School of Business ( MGTECON 331), Health Research & Policy ( HRP 391) & Public Policy ( PUBLPOL 231). Elements used in grading: Participation, attendance, and final exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 3002: Health Law: Quality and Safety of Care

(Formerly Law 727) Concerns about the quality of health care, along with concerns about its cost and accessibility, are the focal points of American health policy. This course will consider how legislators, courts, and professional groups attempt to safeguard the quality and safety of the health care patients receive. The course approaches "regulation" in a broad sense. We will cover regimes for determining who may deliver health care services (e.g. licensing and accreditation agencies), legal and ethical obligations providers owe to patients (e.g. confidentiality, informed consent), individual and institutional liability for substandard care, and various proposals for reforming the medical malpractice system. We will also discuss the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (aka, "Obamacare"), which has led to many new initiatives aimed at improving health care quality. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Exam or Final Paper. Cross-listed with School of Medicine ( MED 209).
Last offered: Spring 2019

LAW 3003: Health Law: The FDA

(Formerly Law 458) This course will examine the Food and Drug Administration. It will focus largely on the FDA's regulation of drugs and biologics, but will also cover its regulation of medical devices, nutritional supplements, and its jurisdiction over special legal, social, and ethical issues arising from advances in the biosciences. Special Instructions: The class is open to all law students and graduate or professional students from other parts of the University. Substantial class attendance is required; in addition, the quality of class participation will play a small role in grading. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, and final exam (In-school, open book). Cross listed with Health Research and Policy ( HRP 209).
Last offered: Spring 2019

LAW 3004: Law and Biosciences: Genetics

(Formerly Law 480) This seminar will focus on ethical, legal, and social issues arising from advances in our knowledge of human genetics. These will drawn from topics such as forensic uses of genetics, genetic testing, widespread whole genome sequencing, genome editing, genome synthesis, the consequences of genetics for human reproduction, and the ethics of genomic biobanks for research, among other things. Students are required to write a research paper for this course. Special Instructions: The class is open to all law students and graduate or professional students from other parts of the University. Substantial class attendance is required; in addition, the quality of class participation will play a small role in grading. Students will be required to submit an independent research paper. Students can take the course for either 2 or 3 units, depending on paper length. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and final paper. Cross-listed with Health Research & Policy ( HRP 221).
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 3005: Law and Biosciences Workshop

This workshop seminar will provide students with the opportunity to examine and critique cutting-edge research and work in the field of law and the biosciences presented by different speakers from Stanford and elsewhere. Although it is open to all students, the seminar is designed especially for those with an interest in the field who wish to stay abreast of current issues, work, and ideas. In each class, an academic expert, policy maker, or practitioner will present his or her current research or work and engage in a robust discussion. This class is worth one unit. It will meet five times for 1 hour, 50 minutes per session; students will need to attend at all five sessions and, for each session attended, write a reflection piece of roughly three double-spaced pages, due just before the speaker's presentation. The class is open to first-year Law School students in Winter Quarter. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, and written assignments.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Greely, H. (PI)

LAW 3006: Law and Biosciences: Neuroscience

This seminar examines legal, social, and ethical issues arising from advances in the biosciences. This year it will focus on neuroscience. It will examine how neuroscience will affect the law, and society, through improvements in predicting illnesses and behaviors, in "reading minds" through neuroimaging, in understanding responsibility and consciousness, in "treating" criminal behavior, and in cognitive enhancement. Students who have taken the Law and the Biosciences (Genetics) seminar in past years may receive additional credit for taking this year's class. The class is open to 1Ls. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and final research paper. Cross-listed with Health Research & Policy ( HRP 211).
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Greely, H. (PI)
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