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171 - 180 of 463 results for: LAW

LAW 2504: Environmental Law and Policy

Environmental law is critically important and endlessly fascinating. In this course, we will look at the major statutes and policies used, at both the federal and state levels, to protect humans and the environment against exposure to harmful substances, including the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Superfund, the Resource Conservation & Recovery Act, and laws designed to regulate toxic substances. This class will also examine the challenges of global air pollution, including climate change and ozone depletion. The class will look not only at the substance of these laws and policies, but also at enforcement challenges, alternative legal mechanisms for advancing environmental policies (such as voter initiatives and common-law actions), the role of market mechanisms in addressing environmental problems, and constitutional restrictions on environmental regulation. As part of the class, students will engage in a series of situational case studies designed to provide a better sense of the real-world issues faced by environmental lawyers and to teach students the skills and tactics needed to solve those issues. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Thompson, B. (PI)

LAW 2505: Land Use Law

This course focuses on the pragmatic (more than theoretical) aspects of contemporary land use law and policy, including: the tools and historical/legal foundation of modern land use law; zoning and General Plans; the process of land development; vested property rights and development agreements; eminent domain, regulatory takings, and exactions; redevelopment; growth control, sprawl, housing density, and affordable housing; historic preservation; direct democracy over land use; global warming and climate action plans; and environmental review (CEQA and NEPA). We explore how land use decisions affect environmental quality and how land use decision-making addresses environmental impacts. Special Instructions: Student participation is essential. Roughly four-fifths of the class time will involve a combination of lecture and classroom discussion. The remaining time will engage students in case studies based on actual land use issues and disputes. This class is limited to 20 students select more »
This course focuses on the pragmatic (more than theoretical) aspects of contemporary land use law and policy, including: the tools and historical/legal foundation of modern land use law; zoning and General Plans; the process of land development; vested property rights and development agreements; eminent domain, regulatory takings, and exactions; redevelopment; growth control, sprawl, housing density, and affordable housing; historic preservation; direct democracy over land use; global warming and climate action plans; and environmental review (CEQA and NEPA). We explore how land use decisions affect environmental quality and how land use decision-making addresses environmental impacts. Special Instructions: Student participation is essential. Roughly four-fifths of the class time will involve a combination of lecture and classroom discussion. The remaining time will engage students in case studies based on actual land use issues and disputes. This class is limited to 20 students selected by consent. Elements used in grading: attendance, class participation, two short writing assignments, an oral presentation, and a final exam. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Schwartz, A. (PI)

LAW 2506: Natural Resources Law and Policy

(Formerly 281) Natural resource management presents extremely difficult and contentious issues of law and public policy. Major debates continue to rage over issues such as the Endangered Species Act, whether the United States should permit drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and how to prevent the overfishing of the oceans. This course will focus on two major aspects of natural-resource management: biodiversity protection (including the Endangered Species Act, ocean fisheries management, and global protection of marine mammals) and public lands in the United States such as national parks and wilderness areas. The course also will examine the National Environmental Protection Act and the effectiveness of environmental impact assessments. Class sessions will include critical examinations of current law and policy and in-depth discussions of situational case studies that force you to consider how you would resolve real-life issues. Students will be expected to participate act more »
(Formerly 281) Natural resource management presents extremely difficult and contentious issues of law and public policy. Major debates continue to rage over issues such as the Endangered Species Act, whether the United States should permit drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and how to prevent the overfishing of the oceans. This course will focus on two major aspects of natural-resource management: biodiversity protection (including the Endangered Species Act, ocean fisheries management, and global protection of marine mammals) and public lands in the United States such as national parks and wilderness areas. The course also will examine the National Environmental Protection Act and the effectiveness of environmental impact assessments. Class sessions will include critical examinations of current law and policy and in-depth discussions of situational case studies that force you to consider how you would resolve real-life issues. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions. (This course will not examine either water law or energy law in any depth. Several other courses in the Law School deal with energy-law questions.) Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam (open book). This course is taught in conjunction with Law 2516 Natural Resources Law and Policy - South Africa: Field Study (limited enrollment). See Law 2516 for details.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 2508: The Business of Water

One of the fastest growing economic sectors is the water field, and private water companies are playing an increasingly important role around the world in water management. In many cases, private companies have made important contributions to meeting water needs (e.g., in the development of new technologies and expanding water supplies). In other cases, however, the involvement of private companies has proven controversial (e.g., when private companies have taken over public water supply systems in developing countries such as Bolivia). This course will look at established or emerging businesses in the water sector and the legal, economic, and social issues that they generate. These businesses include investor-owned water utilities, water technology companies (e.g., companies investing in new desalination or water recycling technologies), water-right funds (who directly buy and sell water rights), social impact funds, innovative agricultural operations, water concessionaires, and infra more »
One of the fastest growing economic sectors is the water field, and private water companies are playing an increasingly important role around the world in water management. In many cases, private companies have made important contributions to meeting water needs (e.g., in the development of new technologies and expanding water supplies). In other cases, however, the involvement of private companies has proven controversial (e.g., when private companies have taken over public water supply systems in developing countries such as Bolivia). This course will look at established or emerging businesses in the water sector and the legal, economic, and social issues that they generate. These businesses include investor-owned water utilities, water technology companies (e.g., companies investing in new desalination or water recycling technologies), water-right funds (who directly buy and sell water rights), social impact funds, innovative agricultural operations, water concessionaires, and infrastructure construction companies and investors. Each week will focus on a different business and company. Company executives will attend the class session and discuss their business with the class. In most classes, we will examine (1) the viability and efficacy of the company's business plan, (2) the legal and/or social issues arising from the business' work, and (3) how the business might contribute to improved water management and policy. Each student will be expected to write (1) two short reflection papers during the course of the quarter on businesses that present to the class, and (2) a 10- to15-page paper at the conclusion on the class on either a water company of the student's choice or a policy initiative that can improve the role that business plays in improving water management (either in a particular sector or more generally). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Civil & Environmental Engineering ( CEE 273B).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

LAW 2509: Clean Energy Project Development and Finance

(Formerly Law 774) This case study-oriented course will focus on the critical skills needed to evaluate, develop, finance (on a non-recourse basis), and complete grid-scale clean energy projects. This course will be essentially the same as in the past four years (when it was cross-listed as GSB GEN 335). This course is highly multi-disciplinary, both in terms of substance and student mix. The course has consistently had a significant mix of business, engineering, law and earth science students. As in the past, the course will focus on the issues associated with the business of developing, financing, constructing and operating grid-scale clean energy projects. The course will focus on what a project developer or lender (i.e., in either case, the business person) needs to know to develop and finance successful projects. The project development business--far more than many other businesses such as tech, manufacturing, consumer, services, retail or transportation--inherently involves a VE more »
(Formerly Law 774) This case study-oriented course will focus on the critical skills needed to evaluate, develop, finance (on a non-recourse basis), and complete grid-scale clean energy projects. This course will be essentially the same as in the past four years (when it was cross-listed as GSB GEN 335). This course is highly multi-disciplinary, both in terms of substance and student mix. The course has consistently had a significant mix of business, engineering, law and earth science students. As in the past, the course will focus on the issues associated with the business of developing, financing, constructing and operating grid-scale clean energy projects. The course will focus on what a project developer or lender (i.e., in either case, the business person) needs to know to develop and finance successful projects. The project development business--far more than many other businesses such as tech, manufacturing, consumer, services, retail or transportation--inherently involves a VERY long list of highly-germane and critical legal issues. We address the legal issues from the perspective of what a business person needs to understand in order to navigate them and complete a project. The primary course materials will be documents from several representative projects -- e.g., solar, wind, storage, carbon capture, transmission, combined heat & power -- covering key areas including market and feasibility studies, environmental permitting and regulatory decisions, financial disclosure from bank and bond transactions, and construction, input, and offtake contracts. For virtually every clean energy project, legal documents and financial/business models tend to highly customized. By examining actual projects and transactions we can learn how developers, financiers, and lawyers work to get deals over the finish line--deals that meet the demands of the market, the requirements of the law, and (sometimes) broader societal goals, in particular climate change, economic competitiveness, and energy security. Elements used in grading: Class Participation (35 %), Lecture-based Assignment (15 %), Group Project (50 %). Absences affect grade. This class is limited to 36 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS, GSB, engineering and earth sciences. (All students need to be graduate students.) CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). Students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Spring 2019

LAW 2510: California Coast: Science, Policy and Law

This interdisciplinary course integrates the legal, scientific, and policy dimensions of how we characterize and manage resource use and allocation along the California coast. We will use this geographic setting as the vehicle for exploring more generally how agencies, legislatures, and courts resolve resource-use conflicts and the role that scientific information and uncertainty play in the process. Our focus will be on the land-sea interface as we explore contemporary coastal land-use and marine resource decision-making, including coastal pollution, public health, ecosystem management; public access; private development; local community and state infrastructure; natural systems and significant threats; resource extraction; and conservation, mitigation and restoration. Students will learn the fundamental physics, chemistry, and biology of the coastal zone, tools for exploring data collected in the coastal ocean, and the institutional framework that shapes public and private decisions more »
This interdisciplinary course integrates the legal, scientific, and policy dimensions of how we characterize and manage resource use and allocation along the California coast. We will use this geographic setting as the vehicle for exploring more generally how agencies, legislatures, and courts resolve resource-use conflicts and the role that scientific information and uncertainty play in the process. Our focus will be on the land-sea interface as we explore contemporary coastal land-use and marine resource decision-making, including coastal pollution, public health, ecosystem management; public access; private development; local community and state infrastructure; natural systems and significant threats; resource extraction; and conservation, mitigation and restoration. Students will learn the fundamental physics, chemistry, and biology of the coastal zone, tools for exploring data collected in the coastal ocean, and the institutional framework that shapes public and private decisions affecting coastal resources. There will be 3 to 4 written assignments addressing policy and science issues during the quarter, as well as a take-home final assignment. Special Instructions: In-class work and discussion is often done in interdisciplinary teams of students from the School of Law, the School of Engineering, the School of Humanities and Sciences, and the School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences. Students are expected to participate in class discussion and 2-3 Saturday field trips. Elements used in grading: Participation, including class session and field trip attendance, writing and quantitative assignments. Cross-listed with Civil & Environmental Engineering ( CEE 175A/275A).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

LAW 2512: Cities and Sustainability: Current Issues, Policy, and Law

Cities are on the front lines of solving many of society's sustainability problems, from advancing green buildings and clean energy, to preparing for the effects of climate change. With a diminishing role of the federal government on environmental policy and regulation, it is up to sub-nationals like states and cities to lead innovation and deployment of clean energy, resilience strategies, water management, and more. This class will explore the evolving role of cities in advancing sustainability from the lens of law, policy, planning, and governance. Some of the topics we will discuss in-depth include climate mitigation, clean energy, green buildings, climate adaptation and resilience, water supply and reuse, land use and transportation, and more. Case studies will focus on U.S. cities with some emphasis on California. Overarching themes across all content areas include legal constraints of city authority, governance, socioeconomic tradeoffs, and the roles of various types of institutions in developing, advancing, and advocating for local policy change. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Exam. Cross-listed with Environment and Resources ( ENVRES 212).
Last offered: Spring 2018

LAW 2513: Climate: Politics, Finance, and Infrastructure

While climate change is often considered an 'environmental problem', the risks and opportunities embedded in a changing climate go well beyond the frame of the natural environment. This course will reframe climate as a macroeconomic challenge, one in which multilateral politics, global investment and physical and institutional infrastructure must be understood and reconsidered. Based on scholarly analysis and guest speakers, this interdisciplinary course will frame the arc of climate past, present and future on the pillars of politics, finance and infrastructure. Starting with the policy framework established by past global climate negotiations, the bulk of the course will investigate current innovations at the intersection of finance and policy, including risk metrics, management and disclosure, liability litigation, blended finance, new investment vehicles and intermediaries, and resilience measures. The final sessions will consider the future, taking a look at how future leaders mig more »
While climate change is often considered an 'environmental problem', the risks and opportunities embedded in a changing climate go well beyond the frame of the natural environment. This course will reframe climate as a macroeconomic challenge, one in which multilateral politics, global investment and physical and institutional infrastructure must be understood and reconsidered. Based on scholarly analysis and guest speakers, this interdisciplinary course will frame the arc of climate past, present and future on the pillars of politics, finance and infrastructure. Starting with the policy framework established by past global climate negotiations, the bulk of the course will investigate current innovations at the intersection of finance and policy, including risk metrics, management and disclosure, liability litigation, blended finance, new investment vehicles and intermediaries, and resilience measures. The final sessions will consider the future, taking a look at how future leaders might solve the greatest challenge of our time. Elements used in grading: Students may take the course for 2 units (section 1) or 3 units (section 2). Section 1 and 2 students will both receive grades for attendance, in class participation and guest-speaker questions. Section 1 students will also complete a group presentation on the design of a financial, business, legal or policy intervention with the potential to reduce emissions on a large scale. Section 2 students will be required to write a research paper meeting the Law School's R paper requirements. This class is limited to 30 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (15 students will be selected by lottery) and 15 non-law students by consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 2515: Environmental Justice

This course will introduce environmental justice as a social movement, including its central substantive concerns (the needs of humans in the built environment rather than the need to protect the environment from humans) and its methods (community-based political organizing rather than professionalized judicial or legislative action). The bulk of the course will then pursue a broader conception of environmental justice today by using social science research, theory, and case studies to investigate the civil rights and poverty aspects of environmental safety and natural resources. The course will include units on: (1) toxic exposure and public health disparities stemming from the disproportionate siting of locally-unwanted land uses in poor neighborhoods of color; (2) access to natural resources and basic public services, including clean water, wastewater disposal, and open space; (3) tools in environmental justice advocacy (including community-based lawyering, Title VI of the Civil Rig more »
This course will introduce environmental justice as a social movement, including its central substantive concerns (the needs of humans in the built environment rather than the need to protect the environment from humans) and its methods (community-based political organizing rather than professionalized judicial or legislative action). The bulk of the course will then pursue a broader conception of environmental justice today by using social science research, theory, and case studies to investigate the civil rights and poverty aspects of environmental safety and natural resources. The course will include units on: (1) toxic exposure and public health disparities stemming from the disproportionate siting of locally-unwanted land uses in poor neighborhoods of color; (2) access to natural resources and basic public services, including clean water, wastewater disposal, and open space; (3) tools in environmental justice advocacy (including community-based lawyering, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Fair Housing Act, common law nuisance actions, and transactional lawyering); (4) environmental justice issues in Indian Country, and (5) environmental justice issues in climate change policy. Much of the course material, including student presentations, will be grounded in the experiences and advocacy histories of specific communities, both urban and rural, across the country. This class is limited to 25 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (20 students will be selected by lottery) and 5 non-law students by consent of instructor. Course requirements will include class participation, in-class presentation, and either response papers (section 01) or a long research paper for R credit (section 02). A maximum of 10 students will be permitted to write the long research paper with instructor consent. After the term begins, students enrolled in the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, in-class presentation; response papers or a final research paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Anderson, M. (PI)

LAW 2516: Natural Resources Law and Policy - South Africa: Field Study

This is the South Africa Field Study component of Natural Resources Law and Policy ( LAW 2506). For details, see course description for Law 2506. This course will look at three issues covered in Natural Resources Law & Policy from a comparative perspective, focusing on Cape Town, South Africa, and the region surrounding it. First, we will look at the water challenges facing Cape Town, including (a) the supply limitations that led the city to warn in 2018 of a "Day Zero" when it would be forced to turn off everyone's taps and (b) the ongoing water equity issues facing the region's impoverished townships such as Khayelitsha. Second, we will visit with companies and law firms seeking to promote renewable energy projects to discuss the issues that they face. Finally, we will meet with environmental non-profits to examine South Africa's efforts to protect wildlife from poaching and other threats. Students might also participate in small, half-day conference with the University of Stellenbo more »
This is the South Africa Field Study component of Natural Resources Law and Policy ( LAW 2506). For details, see course description for Law 2506. This course will look at three issues covered in Natural Resources Law & Policy from a comparative perspective, focusing on Cape Town, South Africa, and the region surrounding it. First, we will look at the water challenges facing Cape Town, including (a) the supply limitations that led the city to warn in 2018 of a "Day Zero" when it would be forced to turn off everyone's taps and (b) the ongoing water equity issues facing the region's impoverished townships such as Khayelitsha. Second, we will visit with companies and law firms seeking to promote renewable energy projects to discuss the issues that they face. Finally, we will meet with environmental non-profits to examine South Africa's efforts to protect wildlife from poaching and other threats. Students might also participate in small, half-day conference with the University of Stellenbosch examining these and related sustainability issues. Elements used in grading: TBA. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Winter 2019
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