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131 - 140 of 460 results for: LAW

LAW 1048: Introduction to Commercial Law

Although definitions of commercial law vary, it generally concerns a business enterprise's contracts with its customers and suppliers (usually not with its investors or employees, and not relating to real property). This course surveys legal issues in contracts for the provision of goods, services and information; franchises and distributorships; commercial credit (including secured credit, sureties and guarantees, and letters of credit). Elements used in grading: Grades will be based on class participation, and either a final exam (section 01) or a final paper (section 02). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section 01 into section 02, which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2019

LAW 1049: Corporate Governance

This seminar will focus on key topics in corporate governance. We will cover a range of legal and economic issues, including the following topics: the use of takeover defenses, hedge fund activism, gatekeeper liability, board diversity, director qualifications, executive compensation, proxy advisory services, and dual class ownership. Each of these issues will be introduced by readings and presentations, but the classes will rely on student discussion and critical evaluation of the papers and positions we examine. Students will have the opportunity to write reaction papers that critically analyze the required readings, and to analyze other corporate governance issues of their choice by working in groups. Elements used in grading: Evaluation will be based on reaction papers, class participation, and performance in the group project and presentation.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

LAW 1050: Law, Business, and Policy Strategy in the Startup Economy

This seminar explores the intersection of legal, business, and policy strategy in the startup economy. The class operates along two concurrent paths: First, under faculty supervision, students will act as if they were outside counsel to a Stanford-affiliated startup, learning the business and personal goals of the founder(s) and spotting the relevant legal and non-legal issues. Students will use formal analytical frameworks, including legal research, business strategy, policy strategy, and design thinking, to craft a comprehensive review of the startup's position within the applicable regulatory and business environment, and will present their strategy recommendations to the founder(s) and a panel of faculty and outside experts. Second, students will engage in a case-based exploration of complex legal, regulatory, and ethical issues that often occur in early stage companies. Through focused case studies, students will be required to spot issues, analyze potential outcomes, and make def more »
This seminar explores the intersection of legal, business, and policy strategy in the startup economy. The class operates along two concurrent paths: First, under faculty supervision, students will act as if they were outside counsel to a Stanford-affiliated startup, learning the business and personal goals of the founder(s) and spotting the relevant legal and non-legal issues. Students will use formal analytical frameworks, including legal research, business strategy, policy strategy, and design thinking, to craft a comprehensive review of the startup's position within the applicable regulatory and business environment, and will present their strategy recommendations to the founder(s) and a panel of faculty and outside experts. Second, students will engage in a case-based exploration of complex legal, regulatory, and ethical issues that often occur in early stage companies. Through focused case studies, students will be required to spot issues, analyze potential outcomes, and make defensible recommendations for legal and business strategy. Issues covered will include corporate formation and capitalization, entering regulated marketplaces, supply chain ethics, employment and culture, and multi-jurisdictional scaling. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Spring 2019

LAW 1051: Payment Systems: Cryptocurrencies

This seminar is designed to afford students the opportunity to study the regulation of new, cutting edge payment systems that employ blockchain technology. To do so, students will familiarize themselves with the current state of the law of payment systems as represented in the Uniform Commercial Code, the National Bank Act, and other relevant statutes. Students will then engage readings regarding the regulatory difficulties presented by the realities of cryptocurrency technology. We will start with the history of digital currency, then look at the laws, organizations, trends, and communities behind it to build a complete picture of the ecosystem surrounding blockchain technology. Each student will present and discuss a paper on a topic of interest within the world of cryptocurrencies generally. Each of the students will research and write a paper on cryptocurrency regulation or regulatory technology as the principle component of their final grades. Students have two options. Those taki more »
This seminar is designed to afford students the opportunity to study the regulation of new, cutting edge payment systems that employ blockchain technology. To do so, students will familiarize themselves with the current state of the law of payment systems as represented in the Uniform Commercial Code, the National Bank Act, and other relevant statutes. Students will then engage readings regarding the regulatory difficulties presented by the realities of cryptocurrency technology. We will start with the history of digital currency, then look at the laws, organizations, trends, and communities behind it to build a complete picture of the ecosystem surrounding blockchain technology. Each student will present and discuss a paper on a topic of interest within the world of cryptocurrencies generally. Each of the students will research and write a paper on cryptocurrency regulation or regulatory technology as the principle component of their final grades. Students have two options. Those taking the course for 2 units (Section 01) will write papers that meet the PW (Professional Writing) requirement. Students taking the course for 3 units (Section 02) will write a long research paper. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from Section (01) into Section (02), which meets the R (Research) requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 1052: Venture Capital and the Dual Fiduciary

This course introduces students to the business and legal/governance issues in venture capital. We will begin with the role of venture capital in the broader US economy, who the players are in the ecosystem and how venture capital funds are raised and managed. We will then have a series of modules through which we'll understand how venture capitalists structure deals (including a full understanding of the economic and governance issues associated with a term sheet). We will dive into the role of the board post-investment, with a particular emphasis on the fiduciary duties (often conflicting) of the board in governing a venture capital financed business. In particular, we will look at the role of the board in financing activities, M&A activities and various special situations. The course will utilize case law as well as various articles and case studies to articulate the potential governance issues boards may encounter. We will focus on practical applications of the rules to real-world more »
This course introduces students to the business and legal/governance issues in venture capital. We will begin with the role of venture capital in the broader US economy, who the players are in the ecosystem and how venture capital funds are raised and managed. We will then have a series of modules through which we'll understand how venture capitalists structure deals (including a full understanding of the economic and governance issues associated with a term sheet). We will dive into the role of the board post-investment, with a particular emphasis on the fiduciary duties (often conflicting) of the board in governing a venture capital financed business. In particular, we will look at the role of the board in financing activities, M&A activities and various special situations. The course will utilize case law as well as various articles and case studies to articulate the potential governance issues boards may encounter. We will focus on practical applications of the rules to real-world situations, with the goal of preparing students post-graduation to be able to properly advise venture-backed boards on how to successfully navigate many of the governance challenge. This class will meet the first five weeks of the quarter (September 25 to October 23). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

LAW 1053: International Securities Regulation

This course will focus on the application of United States securities laws and regulations to non-US issuers. We will examine how that regulatory framework differs for non-US issuers, as compared to issuers domiciled in the United States. Initial public offerings, private placements under Rule 144A and Regulation S and ADR programs will all be covered. We will also discuss ongoing reporting requirements and other implications of being a non-US public company. We will take a close look at the Alibaba IPO . The course will be taught from a practical perspective with in-class review of SEC filings, offering documents, SEC correspondence and applicable SEC rules. The Morrison Case and its progeny defining the reach of U.S. Securities law to conduct with limited U.S. contacts, as well as SEC enforcement actions against non-US issuers, will also be examined. Prior completion of Securities Regulation or a comparable securities law class strongly encouraged. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Exam.
Last offered: Spring 2019

LAW 1054: Economics of Contracts

This course will combine contract theory, a field of economics for which several Nobel prizes have been awarded, with a study of the practice of business transactions. Our discussion will explore how well economic theory illuminates actual contracting practices and how the practice of contract design deviates from theory. Our overarching goal will be to develop an understanding of business transactions that goes beyond the drafting of contract language to conceptual and structural features of agreements. We will discuss design topics such as how contracts respond to incomplete information, the "make or buy" choice (whether to carry out a project within a firm or contract with an external party), the role of judicial enforcement in relational contracts, the use of vague and/or precise language in agreements, obstacles and process of innovation in contracting, and the role and effect of bargaining power. This course differs from the Deals course in that it covers a different set of topics and is less applied, and this course will be conducted in a seminar fashion. Elements used in grading: Class participation, Final Exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

LAW 1055: Law of Nonprofits

This course provides an overview of laws and policies affecting the nonprofit sector. The course will focus both on state laws governing nonprofit corporations and charitable trusts as well as federal tax laws applicable to section 501(c) entities. Topics will include the fiduciary duties of nonprofit directors and trustees, obtaining and maintaining tax-exempt status, nonprofit lobbying and political activities, private foundations and donor-advised funds, and alternative organizational forms such as low-profit limited liability companies and benefit corporations. Lectures and discussions will be supplemented by in-class conversations with leaders of local nonprofit organizations. Special Instructions: No pre-requisites. Knowledge of basic tax and/or corporate law is helpful but not required. Elements used in grading: Final exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 1060: Global Business Law - Asia

This seminar is designed to prepare students for the field study portion ( Law 1061) of the Global Quarter. It will introduce key attributes of the legal, financial and corporate governance systems of Japan and China, particularly those aspects most pertinent to lawyers counseling clients on investing and doing business in those countries. The seminar will also examine several subjects that serve as important conceptual background for the field study, including the widespread phenomenon of foreign legal transplants in Asia, cross-border investor activism, and the role of the state as a participant (via state-owned enterprises) in the economies of China and Singapore. This seminar is only open to students participating in the Global Quarter. Class meets first seven weeks of the quarter. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Milhaupt, C. (PI)

LAW 1061: Global Business Law - Asia: Field Study

This course is the field study portion of the Global Quarter. The field study is comprised of a three-week itinerary of office visits, simulated negotiations and counseling sessions, and seminars in Beijing, Hong Kong, Shenzhen, Singapore, and Tokyo. Participation in the field study qualifies for Pathway B treatment of the Experiential Learning requirement. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Milhaupt, C. (PI)
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