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121 - 130 of 461 results for: LAW

LAW 1037: The Evolution of Finance

(Formerly Law 487) This course provides a framework to understand how uncertainty and technology affect the evolution of finance (and businesses generally), with heavy emphasis on recent developments and future trends. In recent years Myron Scholes has given about half the lectures with the other half given by prominent guests. The guest list changes year to year but 2017's list included David Booth, Katie Hall, Howard Marks, James Manyika, George Osborne, Kevin Warsh, Tom Kempner, and Larry Summers. Jeremy Bulow may replace Myron for a small number of lectures. Special instructions: LAW 1037 is limited to 15 law students. If more than 15 law students enroll, a lottery will be run to determine the final class list. Elements used in grading: No Exam. Participation 50% Projects/Papers 50%. Mandatory attendance. Absences impact grade. Cross-listed with Graduate School of Business ( MGTECON 343).
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 1038: The Future of Finance

This 2-credit course will examine vast changes driven by innovation both from within traditional finance and from new ecosystems in fintech among others. Breathtaking advances in financial theory, big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, computational capability, IoT, payment systems (e.g. blockchain, crypto currencies), new products (e.g. robo advising, digital lending, crowd funding, smart contracts), new trading processes (e.g. algorithmic trading, AI-driven sales & trading), and new markets (e.g. ETFs, zero-cost products), among others are changing not only how financial and non-financial firms conduct business but also how investors and supervisors view the players and the markets. We will discuss critical strategy, policy and legal issues, some resolved and others yet to be (e.g. failed business models, cyber challenges, financial warfare, fake news, bias problems, legal standing for cryptos). The course will feature perspectives from guest speakers including top fina more »
This 2-credit course will examine vast changes driven by innovation both from within traditional finance and from new ecosystems in fintech among others. Breathtaking advances in financial theory, big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, computational capability, IoT, payment systems (e.g. blockchain, crypto currencies), new products (e.g. robo advising, digital lending, crowd funding, smart contracts), new trading processes (e.g. algorithmic trading, AI-driven sales & trading), and new markets (e.g. ETFs, zero-cost products), among others are changing not only how financial and non-financial firms conduct business but also how investors and supervisors view the players and the markets. We will discuss critical strategy, policy and legal issues, some resolved and others yet to be (e.g. failed business models, cyber challenges, financial warfare, fake news, bias problems, legal standing for cryptos). The course will feature perspectives from guest speakers including top finance executives and Silicon Valley entrepreneurs on up-to-the-minute challenges and opportunities in finance. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Final Paper. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and email to the instructor the Consent Application Form, which is available on the Public Policy Program's website at https://publicpolicy.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate/forms. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline. Cross-listed with Economics ( ECON 152/252), Public Policy ( PUBLPOL 364), Statistics ( STATS 238).
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Beder, T. (PI)

LAW 1039: Deal Litigation Seminar

This seminar is designed as an introduction to mergers and acquisitions litigation. The course provides both a practical and doctrinal perspective on M&A-related litigation and relies heavily on readings and issues derived from practice in the Delaware courts where much contemporary deal litigation occurs. Students will be asked to apply cases and legal principles in various practical situations that may arise in a transactional litigation practice. Familiarity with basic corporate law principles is assumed. Classes and readings. The first segment of the course will introduce basic doctrinal principles of M&A law and provide an introduction to the litigator's role in the transactional setting. The remaining sessions will revolve around two detailed M&A case studies, with seminar members divided into group roles. The first week of each case study will involve the negotiation and structuring of an M&A transaction. The second week will involve litigation relating to the transaction. As pa more »
This seminar is designed as an introduction to mergers and acquisitions litigation. The course provides both a practical and doctrinal perspective on M&A-related litigation and relies heavily on readings and issues derived from practice in the Delaware courts where much contemporary deal litigation occurs. Students will be asked to apply cases and legal principles in various practical situations that may arise in a transactional litigation practice. Familiarity with basic corporate law principles is assumed. Classes and readings. The first segment of the course will introduce basic doctrinal principles of M&A law and provide an introduction to the litigator's role in the transactional setting. The remaining sessions will revolve around two detailed M&A case studies, with seminar members divided into group roles. The first week of each case study will involve the negotiation and structuring of an M&A transaction. The second week will involve litigation relating to the transaction. As part of the case studies, students will negotiate a transaction, advise their client, take depositions, write briefs and present oral argument. Reading for the case studies will include case scenarios, supporting materials, and additional relevant case law and articles. Written assignments and grading. Students will be expected to write a final paper, in addition to the brief they will write in connection with their assigned case study. Special Instructions: After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02) which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the seminar for R credit can take the seminar for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the paper length. Corporations ( Law 242) is a prerequisite. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, brief writing/oral argument, and paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3

LAW 1040: Venture Capital

This course examines the venture capital (VC) financing model from both a theoretical and a practical perspective. The course traces the start-up process from initial formation of a new venture and angel investments, through multiple institutional venture capital financing rounds, with a view to potential exits via acquisition or initial public offering. The class will analyze each step in the process from the perspective of the business entity, the founders and employees, the investors, and the lawyers for each party. It also will consider the incentives and control structures used at each stage of financing, with a focus on both the underlying economic and financial theory, as well as on pragmatic considerations in structuring the transactions. Students will learn the VC business model to understand what makes it unique from other investment forms and how that impacts the startup ecosystem. Students will be expected to participate in teams in a term sheet negotiation exercise, become more »
This course examines the venture capital (VC) financing model from both a theoretical and a practical perspective. The course traces the start-up process from initial formation of a new venture and angel investments, through multiple institutional venture capital financing rounds, with a view to potential exits via acquisition or initial public offering. The class will analyze each step in the process from the perspective of the business entity, the founders and employees, the investors, and the lawyers for each party. It also will consider the incentives and control structures used at each stage of financing, with a focus on both the underlying economic and financial theory, as well as on pragmatic considerations in structuring the transactions. Students will learn the VC business model to understand what makes it unique from other investment forms and how that impacts the startup ecosystem. Students will be expected to participate in teams in a term sheet negotiation exercise, become familiar with spreadsheet capitalization tables, participate in class discussions, and sit for an examination. There will be required readings for each session that include a range of materials from law review articles and case law to model deal documents and case studies. Some sessions will include guest speakers with experience in VC or entrepreneurship. This course is co-taught by Gordon Davidson and Michael Esquivel. Both are partners at Fenwick & West LLP who advise technology companies, startups, and venture capitalists. Elements used in grading: Class participation/assignments, negotiation exercises and written summary, and the final exam (open book).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

LAW 1041: Venture Capital II: Starting and Running a Venture-Backed Company

(Formerly Law 401) This class will focus on the legal and non-legal tactical details of entrepreneurial endeavors. The legal specifics of corporate formation, tax, and contracts are well covered by a variety of other courses at the Law School and will only be reviewed briefly in this course. Instead, the course will examine the life stages (formation, financing, execution, and exit) of a venture-backed company from the entrepreneur's perspective. Students who are interested in either starting companies or working with startup founders as their legal counsel will solidify their foundations in this course. There will be no textbook -- course materials will include PowerPoint slides, readings from various entrepreneur and venture capital blogs, sample business plans, and other sources. This course is limited to 14 students. Those students who have taken VC I receive priority in enrollment. Prerequisites: A modest background in financial analysis or the use of Excel, such as might be obta more »
(Formerly Law 401) This class will focus on the legal and non-legal tactical details of entrepreneurial endeavors. The legal specifics of corporate formation, tax, and contracts are well covered by a variety of other courses at the Law School and will only be reviewed briefly in this course. Instead, the course will examine the life stages (formation, financing, execution, and exit) of a venture-backed company from the entrepreneur's perspective. Students who are interested in either starting companies or working with startup founders as their legal counsel will solidify their foundations in this course. There will be no textbook -- course materials will include PowerPoint slides, readings from various entrepreneur and venture capital blogs, sample business plans, and other sources. This course is limited to 14 students. Those students who have taken VC I receive priority in enrollment. Prerequisites: A modest background in financial analysis or the use of Excel, such as might be obtained from any of the introductory finance courses in most undergraduate curriculums or the handful of similar graduate classes at Stanford (such as QM Finance) is strongly recommended for this course. Venture Capital I will also be helpful but is not a prerequisite. Elements used in grading: Class participation (20%), and a 60 minute oral business plan presentation with accompanying slide deck and written materials (80%). CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Spring 2017

LAW 1042: New Venture Finance

This is a practice-oriented business law seminar designed to provide students with an understanding of the legal, business, financial and practical issues that arise in advising venture capital-backed and emerging growth companies through the typical stages of their development and common transactions. The seminar will cover selected corporate, securities and tax issues in areas such as business entity formation, corporate organization and governance, venture capital financings, employee benefits, acquisitions and initial public offerings, with an emphasis on practical solutions and business realities. The goal of the seminar is to provide students with a window into the daily life of a typical Silicon Valley-style corporate attorney. Students are required to complete a number of assignments, participate in a negotiation exercise, participate in class discussions and sit for an exam. There will be required readings for each session that include a range of materials. Some sessions will more »
This is a practice-oriented business law seminar designed to provide students with an understanding of the legal, business, financial and practical issues that arise in advising venture capital-backed and emerging growth companies through the typical stages of their development and common transactions. The seminar will cover selected corporate, securities and tax issues in areas such as business entity formation, corporate organization and governance, venture capital financings, employee benefits, acquisitions and initial public offerings, with an emphasis on practical solutions and business realities. The goal of the seminar is to provide students with a window into the daily life of a typical Silicon Valley-style corporate attorney. Students are required to complete a number of assignments, participate in a negotiation exercise, participate in class discussions and sit for an exam. There will be required readings for each session that include a range of materials. Some sessions will include guest speakers. This course is taught by Mark Reinstra (JD '92), a partner at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati. Mark represents emerging growth companies in substantially all facets of their corporate lives, from incorporation, financings, strategic transactions and, ultimately, liquidity events. Elements used in grading: Students will be evaluated on class participation/assignments, negotiation exercises and a final exam (In-School Essay - closed book).
Last offered: Winter 2018

LAW 1043: Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies: Law, Economics, Business and Policy

Blockchain and cryptocurrency technologies have spawned an extensive and rapidly growing set of businesses along with a corresponding rapidly expanding need for lawyers and regulators with the required expertise. This course provides core background for legal, policy, or business work in the field by nurturing three areas of understanding: (1) the technologies themselves; (2) the scope and nature of business applications; and (3) the pertinent legal and regulatory structures with particular emphasis on securities regulation aspects. Elements used in grading: Exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Strnad, J. (PI)

LAW 1045: Prediction and Complexity in Corporate and Securities Litigation

Success as an attorney and businessperson depends on the ability to predict outcomes in complex situations. Law school courses generally do not develop this skill set. The traditional "case method" asks us to understand how and why cases have been decided. I contrast, this course's "prediction method" challenges students to understand how and why cases yet to be decided will be resolved. The course addresses the academic literature related to prediction, and uses a series of case studies related to undecided cases currently on the US Supreme Court docket to develop student skills as predictors and analysts of complex litigation and transactional situations. This course is open only to students who have already taken and successfully completed a course on Corporate Law or Securities Regulation. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, and Final Exam. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 1046: Deals in Hong Kong: Field Study

This is a travel course that is integrated into Deals I and Deals II. Students who take this course will have taken Deals I and Deals II in the same year. The course will have two elements. First, there will be two deals assigned to two groups of students, as is true of Deals II. Rather than meeting with the lawyers involved in those deals here at Stanford, as we do in Deals II, we will meet in Hong Kong. Students will complete their papers on these deals shortly following their week in Hong Kong. Second, we have a variety of meetings in Hong Kong in which we learn about transactions that are handled by lawyers and bankers there and more generally about business in that part of the world.
Last offered: Winter 2018

LAW 1047: Business, Social Responsibility, and Human Rights

Large corporations now routinely spend millions of dollars to protect human rights and the environment. Shell Nigeria builds hospitals and schools in the Niger Delta. Nike employs hundreds of inspectors to improve conditions for the factory workers who produce its shoes across Asia and Latin America. Technology companies such as Facebook have scrambled to fend off the threat of new regulation since the Cambridge Analytica revelations. Other examples abound, across industries and around the globe. "Don't be evil" (Google's former motto) may be one motivation for these companies, but something more mundane is also at work: many companies believe they will do well, financially, if they do good, ethically. This course examines questions that lawyers in large law firms, corporations, NGOs, and government agencies regularly confront: --What does it mean for a company to "do good"? Should it care? --When does it serve a company's interest to take costly action to address human rights, labor, more »
Large corporations now routinely spend millions of dollars to protect human rights and the environment. Shell Nigeria builds hospitals and schools in the Niger Delta. Nike employs hundreds of inspectors to improve conditions for the factory workers who produce its shoes across Asia and Latin America. Technology companies such as Facebook have scrambled to fend off the threat of new regulation since the Cambridge Analytica revelations. Other examples abound, across industries and around the globe. "Don't be evil" (Google's former motto) may be one motivation for these companies, but something more mundane is also at work: many companies believe they will do well, financially, if they do good, ethically. This course examines questions that lawyers in large law firms, corporations, NGOs, and government agencies regularly confront: --What does it mean for a company to "do good"? Should it care? --When does it serve a company's interest to take costly action to address human rights, labor, and environmental concerns? --What tactics have activists used to shift public opinion, media frames, and the law, and thereby change companies' incentives? We will learn through seminar-style discussion, lectures, role play, and small group exercises. Several guest speakers with experience in business, advocacy, or in between will provide insights from their experiences on the ground. Special Instructions: Students have the option to write a long research paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students enrolled in the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Written Assignments; Final Exam or Final Paper. Cross-listed with International Policy ( INTLPOL 358).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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