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111 - 120 of 460 results for: LAW

LAW 1028: Tax Policy

This course will explore various tax policy issues. In past years, the issues we've explored have included the carbon tax, health care, social security, consumption tax, tax compliance, tax shelters and school financing. Special Instructions: Grades will be based on either (A) class participation and memos responding to the discussion questions for any three of the sessions or (B) class participation and a research paper on a topic of your choosing (subject to instructor approval). Option B is Research (R) credit. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, attendance and written assignments.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

LAW 1029: Taxation I

This course provides an overview of the federal income tax. Elements used in grading: class participation and final exam (self-scheduled).
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Goldin, J. (PI)

LAW 1029: Taxation I

This course provides an overview of the federal income tax. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Bankman, J. (PI)

LAW 1030: Partnership Tax

(Formerly Law 377) This course will cover the basic rules that govern the tax treatment of partnerships and partners, with a focus on agreements and issues that are relevant to venture capital and private equity investment partnerships. The course will be primarily problem-set based. Prerequisites: Taxation I required; Corporate Income Taxation suggested but not required. Elements used in grading:, Final Exam, Class Participation.
Last offered: Winter 2017

LAW 1031: Current Issues in Business Law

This course will focus on issues in law and business that are both important to practitioners and the subject of academic or policy debates. We will cover a range of legal and economic issues, including the following topics: nonbank lending, gatekeeper liability, capital repatriation and tax policy, corporate restructuring, blockchain and smart contracts, and cyber risk management. Each of these issues will be introduced by readings and presentations, but the classes will rely on student discussion and critical evaluation of the papers and positions we examine. Students will have the opportunity to write reaction papers that critically analyze the required readings and to learn and analyze other business law issues of their choice by working in groups. Elements used in grading: Reaction papers, class participation, and performance in the group project and presentation.
Last offered: Spring 2018

LAW 1032: Banking Law

(Formerly 378) This course will examine the legal and regulatory system governing financial institutions, with an emphasis on banks. It will do so by exploring the underlying economics of banking, and the ongoing effort to reform financial regulation. Questions addressed will include: Why do we regulate financial institutions? What dangers do we want to avoid? How well does the current regulatory system achieve what we want to achieve? What alternative approaches can be taken? What are the costs and benefits of the current system, and those of the alternatives? Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, final exam.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

LAW 1033: Trusts and Estates

This course will cover the following topics: intestacy; will execution and revocation; will provisions and interpretations; restrictions on the right to devise; probate; creation, amendment and termination of trusts; revocable and irrevocable trusts; trust provisions; charitable trusts; trust administration; and durable powers of attorneys, advanced health care directives and conservatorships. Elements used in grading: Final exam (In-School: open book, essay).
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Pearson, B. (PI)

LAW 1034: Real Estate Transactions

Real Estate Transactions and Commercial Development examines the structuring, negotiation and documentation of commercial real estate transactions. Working both individually and in groups, students will learn the requisite skills for drafting and negotiating leases, letters of intent, sale contracts and related financing documents. As time permits, development-related matters will be explored, including the legal aspects of site acquisition, design and construction. Classes will be a mixture of lectures, interactive discussions, and several mock negotiations. Elements used in grading: Class attendance, individual and group project participation, and written assignments. No final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Kleiman, D. (PI)

LAW 1035: Mergers, Acquisitions and other Complex Transactions

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the law and practice of mergers, acquisitions and other complex transactions. It will cover key and emerging issues in transactional legal practice, including in mergers, tender offers, carve-outs and asset sales, negotiated and unsolicited acquisitions, buyouts, conflict transactions, spin-offs/split-offs and deal activism. In addition to the relevant laws, regulations and fiduciary standards, the course will cover key aspects of the deal-making process, including mechanisms for protecting a preferred transaction and increasing deal certainty, takeover preparedness and responding to hostile offers, as well as structuring alternatives. The course will include practical exercises on M&A topics and guest speakers who have encountered some of the issues discussed. Prerequisite: Corporations, except on petition to the instructors based on prior coursework or special experience. The course is intended both for students anticipating a career in more »
This course is a comprehensive introduction to the law and practice of mergers, acquisitions and other complex transactions. It will cover key and emerging issues in transactional legal practice, including in mergers, tender offers, carve-outs and asset sales, negotiated and unsolicited acquisitions, buyouts, conflict transactions, spin-offs/split-offs and deal activism. In addition to the relevant laws, regulations and fiduciary standards, the course will cover key aspects of the deal-making process, including mechanisms for protecting a preferred transaction and increasing deal certainty, takeover preparedness and responding to hostile offers, as well as structuring alternatives. The course will include practical exercises on M&A topics and guest speakers who have encountered some of the issues discussed. Prerequisite: Corporations, except on petition to the instructors based on prior coursework or special experience. The course is intended both for students anticipating a career in transactional legal practice as well as for students seeking to develop a general understanding of issues in M&A transactions. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Exam. Casebook: We will be using a casebook: Mergers and Acquisitions Law, Theory, and Practice by Claire Hill, Brian JM Quinn and Steven Davidoff Solomon (West Academic Publishing 2016).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Chen, R. (PI)

LAW 1036: Introduction to Finance

This course is a basic introduction to the principles of finance and is intended as a primer on principles of valuation that are useful in everything from settlement negotiations to family law. No prior knowledge of finance will be assumed. If you want an introduction to corporate finance and won't take the full 3 credit course, this is for you. The first part of the course (approximately 6 weeks) will consist of on-line modules and problem sets that you will complete on your own and in small groups. We will cover topics such as: earnings, cash flows, income statements, interest rates, time value of money, estimating firm value, risk and return and the cost of capital. We will provide a framework for answering questions such as: how much is this project (or firm) worth? How should the firm raise money for a new investment? There will be weekly problem sets and you will get experience with building a simple model (excel spreadsheet) that will help you estimate the value of a potential n more »
This course is a basic introduction to the principles of finance and is intended as a primer on principles of valuation that are useful in everything from settlement negotiations to family law. No prior knowledge of finance will be assumed. If you want an introduction to corporate finance and won't take the full 3 credit course, this is for you. The first part of the course (approximately 6 weeks) will consist of on-line modules and problem sets that you will complete on your own and in small groups. We will cover topics such as: earnings, cash flows, income statements, interest rates, time value of money, estimating firm value, risk and return and the cost of capital. We will provide a framework for answering questions such as: how much is this project (or firm) worth? How should the firm raise money for a new investment? There will be weekly problem sets and you will get experience with building a simple model (excel spreadsheet) that will help you estimate the value of a potential new project. The second part of the course will consist of in-class discussions of case studies that apply these valuation principles to particular legal settings: e.g. valuing settlement offers, merger proposals, appraisal proceedings, and the efficient capital markets hypothesis. We hope that this flexible format will allow more students to take finance. If you wish, you can take this course and then later take Corporate Finance 1. The class will meet (TBA). Additional small group meetings will be scheduled with the instructor. On-line component. Elements used in grading: Written Assignments, Final Project.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Daines, R. (PI)
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