2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

11 - 20 of 460 results for: LAW

LAW 240B: Discussion (1L): Comparative Approaches to Law and Inequality

In this discussion seminar, we will examine how various countries across Europe and Latin American, as well as the United States, seek to deploy law to promote equality for subordinated groups---including especially racial minorities and women. We will examine how laws seeking to promote racial and gender equality, often developed first in the United States, came to be transplanted elsewhere, and how in the process these were transformed in significant ways. Topics will include anti-discrimination law, harassment law, affirmative action (including but not limited to quotas), and parental leave. How and why did the law change as it was transplanted from one legal system and culture into another? To the extent that different legal systems have adopted different approaches, which is preferable---and according to what metrics? Moreover, to the extent that we prefer an approach deployed elsewhere, what are the chances of adopting some version of it here in the United States (or vice versa)? This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Kessler, A. (PI)

LAW 240C: Discussion (1L): Corporate Social Responsibility

How can a company's managers safeguard the firm's financial value for its shareholders while, at the same time, operating ethically and purposively benefiting other stakeholders, including its employees and the communities in which the firm operates? Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is rooted in the idea that shareholder value is not the only measure of a firm's value and, indeed, that the exclusive pursuit of profits may produce social harms. The seminar will consider a variety of legal issues related to CSR, including: 1. The meaning and measure of environmental, social, and governance (ESG) criteria for corporations. 2. The voluntary or mandatory disclosure of a company's environmental and social harms or risks. 3. When is it legally and ethically appropriate for corporate managers or institutional investors to compromise shareholder value in the pursuit of social and environment goals? 4. Constituency statutes and benefit corporations that reflect interests other than profit m more »
How can a company's managers safeguard the firm's financial value for its shareholders while, at the same time, operating ethically and purposively benefiting other stakeholders, including its employees and the communities in which the firm operates? Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is rooted in the idea that shareholder value is not the only measure of a firm's value and, indeed, that the exclusive pursuit of profits may produce social harms. The seminar will consider a variety of legal issues related to CSR, including: 1. The meaning and measure of environmental, social, and governance (ESG) criteria for corporations. 2. The voluntary or mandatory disclosure of a company's environmental and social harms or risks. 3. When is it legally and ethically appropriate for corporate managers or institutional investors to compromise shareholder value in the pursuit of social and environment goals? 4. Constituency statutes and benefit corporations that reflect interests other than profit maximization. 5. The power of investors to influence corporate behavior through capital allocation-investments (including impact investing) and divestments-and shareholder activism. 6. The power of other stakeholders, including consumers and employees, to influence corporate behavior. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

LAW 240D: Discussion (1L): Criminal Legal Histories

This seminar will trace the roots of four critical aspects of the American criminal justice system: jury independence and the power of jurors to render verdicts according to conscience; plea bargaining and the progressive marginalization of juries; penitentiaries and the displacement of other forms of punishment; and the criminalization of recreational drugs. Though modern criminal justice policy will inform our conversation, the readings will be historical with an emphasis on primary source documents. We will examine the forces driving legal evolution and the historian's tools in mapping those forces. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Fisher, G. (PI)

LAW 240E: Discussion (1L): Dress Codes: Law, Status, Sex, and Power

Dress codes may seem a bit old fashioned, but in fact we are constantly told who should wear what and when. Rules---written and implied---divide formal from casual attire and children's clothing from that of adults. There are rules for what to wear in each season of the year and rules about the right attire for different times of the day. And, of course, there are rules about the types of clothing men may wear and about the clothing suitable for women. Adherence to such rules is considered by many to be an important signal of breeding and even character: accordingly, immediate social sanctions---and indirect professional consequences---can follow from breaking them. Some dress codes are job requirements or house rules of an organization or establishment---flouting them can get one fired, kicked out of school or barred from a restaurant. Finally, there are laws about clothing, enforced by police or government officials. Break these rules and you may find yourself facing a fine or even a more »
Dress codes may seem a bit old fashioned, but in fact we are constantly told who should wear what and when. Rules---written and implied---divide formal from casual attire and children's clothing from that of adults. There are rules for what to wear in each season of the year and rules about the right attire for different times of the day. And, of course, there are rules about the types of clothing men may wear and about the clothing suitable for women. Adherence to such rules is considered by many to be an important signal of breeding and even character: accordingly, immediate social sanctions---and indirect professional consequences---can follow from breaking them. Some dress codes are job requirements or house rules of an organization or establishment---flouting them can get one fired, kicked out of school or barred from a restaurant. Finally, there are laws about clothing, enforced by police or government officials. Break these rules and you may find yourself facing a fine or even a jail sentence. Why is attire so rule bound? Why and when is clothing important enough to become the subject of written treatises, rules and regulations, legislative proclamations and judicial edicts? This seminar will explore dress codes, from the sumptuary laws of the late Middle Ages to the unstated norms of the 21st century, and discover what they can tell us about the significance of clothing---our most conspicuous medium of self-expression---and its relationship to individual identity, community cohesiveness and social order. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Ford, R. (PI)

LAW 240F: Discussion (1L): Feminist Jurisprudence

This discussion seminar will consider some of the major theoretical writings of the past 40 years in feminist legal theory, and explore the application of different theoretical approaches to contemporary issues in the law. Likely readings include Catherine MacKinnon, Robin West, Janet Halley, and Angela Harris. Possible topics include campus sexual misconduct codes, the Me Too movement, the meaning of consent, and the legal treatment of the family. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Fried, B. (PI)

LAW 240G: Discussion (1L): Innovation and Inequality

Throughout history, innovation has been a leading driver of economic growth and has helped lift communities out of poverty, and the importance of knowledge goods to the global economy has only increased with the rise of computing and information technologies. Legal institutions incentivize innovation and allocate access to knowledge goods through a variety of mechanisms, including intellectual property, direct funding through grants and national laboratories, tax incentives, and innovation inducement prizes. In this discussion group, we will examine how these bodies of law are used both to reinforce and subvert existing power structures and inequalities, including issues related to gender, race, geography, and income. We will discuss inequalities among innovators as well as inequalities in access to new innovations, or in who those innovations are made for. We will also consider how these issues might be addressed through legal reforms either internal or external to innovation laws. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

LAW 240H: Discussion (1L): Measuring Access to Justice and Access to Information in Marginalized Communities

In this discussion seminar, we will explore the intersection of access to information and access to justice. Our current social and technological moment promises increased access to basic legal information without economic or geographic boundaries. But access and accessibility remain influenced by identity, privilege, and power. What are our collective expectations for governments to provide legal information in the digital age? How does access to free, easy-to-use, reliable legal information -- or the lack thereof -- have an impact on low-income and other marginalized communities, particularly in how they exercise their rights and protect themselves from harm? By examining how some of the most vulnerable populations access legal information, we can better assess the concept of open government with an eye toward informing and improving access to justice efforts. Topics to be explored through readings and discussion include: 1) the adequacy of pro se litigants' access to legal informati more »
In this discussion seminar, we will explore the intersection of access to information and access to justice. Our current social and technological moment promises increased access to basic legal information without economic or geographic boundaries. But access and accessibility remain influenced by identity, privilege, and power. What are our collective expectations for governments to provide legal information in the digital age? How does access to free, easy-to-use, reliable legal information -- or the lack thereof -- have an impact on low-income and other marginalized communities, particularly in how they exercise their rights and protect themselves from harm? By examining how some of the most vulnerable populations access legal information, we can better assess the concept of open government with an eye toward informing and improving access to justice efforts. Topics to be explored through readings and discussion include: 1) the adequacy of pro se litigants' access to legal information within the American prison system; 2) measuring the impact of U.S. states and municipalities that contract with private companies to publish public laws; 3) ways in which technology might help close the justice gap in low-income communities v. how technology can expose vulnerable communities to new forms of victimization; 4) creative and unique systems of information-sharing within the homeless population and how legal organizations might penetrate those systems to combat disenfranchisement of the homeless and provide them with broader access to legal services; and 5) the fragility of freedom of information laws in democracies and whether these laws contribute to a more informed public. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Williams, B. (PI)

LAW 240I: Discussion (1L): Prosecutors and Defense Attorneys as Agents of Change

What opportunities do prosecutors and defense attorneys have to help reform the criminal justice system and the wider society? And how can they best take advantage of those opportunities? We will explore these questions by reading and discussing three books: J Anthony Lukas, Big Trouble: A Murder in a Small Western Town Sets Off a Struggle for the Soul of America (1998); Gilbert King, Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America (2013); and Emily Bazelon, Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration (2019). This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Sklansky, D. (PI)

LAW 240J: Discussion (1L): Religion and the Practice of Law

This seminar will focus on the dynamic interplay between religious identity, community, and worldview, and the study, practice, and profession of law. As a defining force for so many across the globe, and in the norms through which human beings recognize their rights and arrange their affairs, religion has a unique and abiding impact on the work and life of aspiring and practicing lawyers--for believers and nonbelievers alike. Whether as first-year law students or seasoned practitioners, the need to anticipate, appreciate, and reconcile religious perspectives is both a vital professional skill and an illuminating resource for self-understanding and mutual respect. The class will meet across three on-campus sessions and a closing offsite dinner, and will include a collaborative exploration of primary and secondary sources, as well as custom conversational frameworks. Topics will include religion and cross-cultural lawyering, religion and legal systems, the role of faith in judicial deci more »
This seminar will focus on the dynamic interplay between religious identity, community, and worldview, and the study, practice, and profession of law. As a defining force for so many across the globe, and in the norms through which human beings recognize their rights and arrange their affairs, religion has a unique and abiding impact on the work and life of aspiring and practicing lawyers--for believers and nonbelievers alike. Whether as first-year law students or seasoned practitioners, the need to anticipate, appreciate, and reconcile religious perspectives is both a vital professional skill and an illuminating resource for self-understanding and mutual respect. The class will meet across three on-campus sessions and a closing offsite dinner, and will include a collaborative exploration of primary and secondary sources, as well as custom conversational frameworks. Topics will include religion and cross-cultural lawyering, religion and legal systems, the role of faith in judicial decision-making, and law as a vocation (with attendant self-care dynamics). Befitting the overarching goals of diversity and inclusion in the discussion series generally, and the central importance of particularized themes of bridgebuilding, this seminar is warmly and equally open to students of any religious tradition and those of no religion at all. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Sonne, J. (PI)

LAW 240K: Discussion (1L): Representations of Criminal Lawyers in Popular Culture Through the Lens of Bias

This discussion group will explore the portrayal of criminal lawyers in popular films and will engage in critical analysis of how misconceptions about the criminal justice system and biases against women, people of color and the poor are amplified on the big screen. Source materials will include numerous mass-market films juxtaposed against authoritative law review and other commentary to afford in-depth discussion. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Tyler, R. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints