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41 - 50 of 475 results for: LAW

LAW 807H: Policy Practicum: Can Opening Up the Legal Services Market Increase Access to Justice?

Several states --- including California, Arizona and Utah --- are considering or already moving forward with changes to the regulations on who can provide legal services --- regulations that are contained in the Rules of Professional Conduct for each state. These proposed reforms are designed to accelerate innovation in the delivery of legal services, and increase access to justice, in part by allowing technology and people without JDs to play a greater role than they can today. As states consider these reforms, there are many questions around the likely impact of these reforms on consumers and providers of legal services, and the most promising regulatory regime(s). Students will research and write about such questions as: (1) What are some of the most promising models from other industries for protecting consumers from harm, and providing redress? (2) What might an independent regulator that oversees entities that provide legal services look like? (3) What are the most promising inno more »
Several states --- including California, Arizona and Utah --- are considering or already moving forward with changes to the regulations on who can provide legal services --- regulations that are contained in the Rules of Professional Conduct for each state. These proposed reforms are designed to accelerate innovation in the delivery of legal services, and increase access to justice, in part by allowing technology and people without JDs to play a greater role than they can today. As states consider these reforms, there are many questions around the likely impact of these reforms on consumers and providers of legal services, and the most promising regulatory regime(s). Students will research and write about such questions as: (1) What are some of the most promising models from other industries for protecting consumers from harm, and providing redress? (2) What might an independent regulator that oversees entities that provide legal services look like? (3) What are the most promising innovations in states that have experimented with non- lawyer providers and other access to justice initiatives. (4) What lessons can we learn from other contexts, including other countries and other professions (for example the medical context, where nurse practitioners can provide services directly, and people other than physicians can own entities that provide health care)? The client will be one or more of the following non-profits working on these issues: the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System, National Center on State Courts, or Responsive Law. The deliverables will be a set of policy briefs and talking points that will inform the regulatory reform debate. Students from a range of disciplines are very welcome, including undergraduates interested in public policy. We will tentatively meet Tues 4-5, but if that doesn¿t work for everyone, we can find times to meet during the lunch hour as well. Elements used in grading: Performance, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 807I: Policy Practicum: Tools for Reentry: Practices, Apps, and Services

Client: Various government agencies and nonprofit groups. Formerly incarcerated individuals face a range of personal and institutional challenges in their reentry into broader society. Considerable research and many programs have focused on systems reform and support and social programs to increase the likelihood of successful reentry. But technological tools also have the potential to help lower friction and increase the success of reentry. This policy lab will engage with challenging legal, social, government systems, and technological questions, with opportunities to design and/or implement new tools to aid in the reentry process. We will work with a variety of stakeholders including government organizations and programs, non-profit entities, and legal innovators to prototype and evaluate new technological solutions to facilitate the reentry process and reduce recidivism. This practicum will build a collaborative team of diverse backgrounds and skill sets to learn from each other an more »
Client: Various government agencies and nonprofit groups. Formerly incarcerated individuals face a range of personal and institutional challenges in their reentry into broader society. Considerable research and many programs have focused on systems reform and support and social programs to increase the likelihood of successful reentry. But technological tools also have the potential to help lower friction and increase the success of reentry. This policy lab will engage with challenging legal, social, government systems, and technological questions, with opportunities to design and/or implement new tools to aid in the reentry process. We will work with a variety of stakeholders including government organizations and programs, non-profit entities, and legal innovators to prototype and evaluate new technological solutions to facilitate the reentry process and reduce recidivism. This practicum will build a collaborative team of diverse backgrounds and skill sets to learn from each other and enhance the overall capacity of the research and tool development. We encourage students who are interested in criminal justice, technology for social impact, access to justice, and entrepreneurship and innovation for social good to join us, including upper-division and graduate students from Law, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, MS&E, Public Policy, and the social sciences. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final PROJECT. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 807J: Policy Practicum: California Penal Code Revision Committee Project

This policy lab assists the newly formed California Committee for the Revision of the Penal Code in developing strategies for criminal justice reform in California. The Committee is directed by the Governor and state legislature with studying and making recommendations to simplify and rationalize the substance and procedure of criminal law in California. In 2020, the Committee will likely address five areas of the state's criminal justice system, and students will be responsible for helping set reform priorities within those subject areas, researching existing policy strengths and weaknesses, comparing California law with other jurisdictions, consulting with subject-matter experts, and suggesting and analyzing reform proposals. Students will work directly with Committee members and staff and attend Committee hearings in Sacramento and across the state. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

LAW 881: Externship Companion Seminar

The practice of public interest law -- whether in the criminal or civil context, or a government or non-profit setting -- requires an attorney to consider a host of issues distinct from one in private practice. How should decisions be made about priorities with limited resources? Where an organization has a broad social justice mission, where does litigation on behalf of individual clients or a group of clients fit in? Prior to initiating litigation or advancing a defense, what quantum of evidence should an attorney require? What role, if any, should an attorney's personal beliefs play in a course of representation? Through directed supervision of their externships, as well as participation in weekly seminars, students will evaluate such questions in the context of their practical experience. Students are required to write weekly reflection papers of 2 to 3 pages. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, weekly reflection papers and final reflection paper.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Winn, M. (PI)

LAW 882: Externship, Civil Law

Following approval of a student's application, the Civil Standard Externship Program (SEP) allows second and third year students to obtain academic credit for externing with select non-profit public interest, public policy, and government agencies in the Bay Area for one quarter. The Civil SEP allows students to (a) gain experience in a field where a clinical course is not offered, or (b) pursue advanced work in an area of prior clinical practice. Students may extern for 20, 24, 30, or 34 hours per week. For a complete description of the Civil SEP, students should read the Externship Handbook, which is available from the Levin Center for Public Service and Public Interest Law or online at: http://www.law.stanford.edu/organizations/programs-and-centers/john-and-terry-levin-center-for-public-service-and-public-interest-law/externship-program-0 . Students wishing to enroll in an externship must meet various requirements that are set out in the Handbook. Students participating in the Civi more »
Following approval of a student's application, the Civil Standard Externship Program (SEP) allows second and third year students to obtain academic credit for externing with select non-profit public interest, public policy, and government agencies in the Bay Area for one quarter. The Civil SEP allows students to (a) gain experience in a field where a clinical course is not offered, or (b) pursue advanced work in an area of prior clinical practice. Students may extern for 20, 24, 30, or 34 hours per week. For a complete description of the Civil SEP, students should read the Externship Handbook, which is available from the Levin Center for Public Service and Public Interest Law or online at: http://www.law.stanford.edu/organizations/programs-and-centers/john-and-terry-levin-center-for-public-service-and-public-interest-law/externship-program-0 . Students wishing to enroll in an externship must meet various requirements that are set out in the Handbook. Students participating in the Civil SEP must also concurrently enroll in the Externship Companion Seminar ( Law 881). An externship that otherwise meets the criteria for obtaining EL credit will be approved for EL credit when the field placement provides specialized experience complementary to a student's intended career path and comparable benefits cannot be obtained through other EL coursework at Stanford. Grading Elements used: Full participation and attendance, satisfactory evaluation by field placement supervisor, weekly reflection papers of two to three pages. .
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5-12
Instructors: Winn, M. (PI)

LAW 883: Externship, Criminal Law

Following approval of a student's application, the Criminal Standard Externship Program (SEP) allows second and third year students to work for credit in criminal prosecutors' and defenders' offices in the Bay Area for one quarter. Students may extern for 20, 24, 30, or 34 hours per week. For a complete description of the Criminal SEP, students should read the Externship Handbook, which is available from the Levin Center for Public Service and Public Interest Law or online at: http://www.law.stanford.edu/organizations/programs-and-centers/john-and-terry-levin-center-for-public-service-and-public-interest-law/externship-program-0 . Students wishing to enroll in an externship must meet various requirements that are set out in the Handbook. Students participating in the Criminal SEP must also concurrently enroll in the Externship Companion Seminar. An externship that otherwise meets the criteria for obtaining EL credit will be approved for EL credit when the field placement provides spec more »
Following approval of a student's application, the Criminal Standard Externship Program (SEP) allows second and third year students to work for credit in criminal prosecutors' and defenders' offices in the Bay Area for one quarter. Students may extern for 20, 24, 30, or 34 hours per week. For a complete description of the Criminal SEP, students should read the Externship Handbook, which is available from the Levin Center for Public Service and Public Interest Law or online at: http://www.law.stanford.edu/organizations/programs-and-centers/john-and-terry-levin-center-for-public-service-and-public-interest-law/externship-program-0 . Students wishing to enroll in an externship must meet various requirements that are set out in the Handbook. Students participating in the Criminal SEP must also concurrently enroll in the Externship Companion Seminar. An externship that otherwise meets the criteria for obtaining EL credit will be approved for EL credit when the field placement provides specialized experience complementary to a student's intended career path and comparable benefits cannot be obtained through other EL coursework at Stanford. Grading Elements used: Full participation and attendance, satisfactory evaluation by field placement supervisor, weekly reflection papers of two to three pages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5-12
Instructors: Winn, M. (PI)

LAW 884: Externship, Special Circumstances

Following approval of a student's application, the Special Circumstances Externship Program (SCEP) allows second and third year students to work for credit for one quarter in non-profit public interest, public policy, and government agencies outside of the Bay Area. Standards for approval of a SCEP placement are similar to those for Directed Research proposals, although they are higher. Because there is a preference for local civil and criminal SEP placements (see Law 882 and Law 883), your SCEP proposal must explain (a) how it meets the goals of the externship program; and (b) why a similar project cannot be accomplished in one of the placements offered in the Bay Area. SCEP placements outside the Bay Area must be full-time. Students wishing to undertake a SCEP placement obtain the supervision of a faculty member who will oversee their externship and an accompanying tutorial. For a full description of the SCEP, students should read the Externship Handbook, which is available from th more »
Following approval of a student's application, the Special Circumstances Externship Program (SCEP) allows second and third year students to work for credit for one quarter in non-profit public interest, public policy, and government agencies outside of the Bay Area. Standards for approval of a SCEP placement are similar to those for Directed Research proposals, although they are higher. Because there is a preference for local civil and criminal SEP placements (see Law 882 and Law 883), your SCEP proposal must explain (a) how it meets the goals of the externship program; and (b) why a similar project cannot be accomplished in one of the placements offered in the Bay Area. SCEP placements outside the Bay Area must be full-time. Students wishing to undertake a SCEP placement obtain the supervision of a faculty member who will oversee their externship and an accompanying tutorial. For a full description of the SCEP, students should read the Externship Handbook, which is available from the Levin Center for Public Service and Public Interest Law or online at: http://www.law.stanford.edu/organizations/programs-and-centers/john-and-terry-levin-center-for-public-service-and-public-interest-law/externship-program-0. Students wishing to enroll in an externship must meet the various requirements that are set out in the Handbook. An externship that otherwise meets the criteria for obtaining EL credit will be approved for EL credit when the field placement provides specialized experience complementary to a student's intended career path and comparable benefits cannot be obtained through other EL coursework at Stanford. Grading Elements used: Full participation and attendance, satisfactory evaluation by field placement supervisor, weekly reflection papers of three to five pages, and a final reflection paper of a length to be determined by your faculty supervisor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 12

LAW 902: Advanced Community Law Clinic

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 902A: Community Law Clinic: Clinical Practice

The CLC is the closest thing to a general legal services office among Stanford's clinical offerings. Based in East Palo Alto, the CLC provides students with the opportunity to provide direct legal services to low-income residents, while thinking critically about the role of lawyers and lawyering in addressing the problems of America's so-called "working poor." The Clinic's practice is in four areas: (1) housing (eviction defense and Section 8 termination); (2) wage and hour and related workers' rights; (3) social security and disability benefits; and (4) criminal record expungement. Each student handles his or her own caseload, which is comprised of cases matters in all of the practice areas. The practice areas are selected and designed to lie at the intersection where the community's unmet legal needs and students' learning needs correspond. The clinic's docket is fundamentally a trial docket. Students have first-chair responsibility for their cases, and perform all of the lawyering t more »
The CLC is the closest thing to a general legal services office among Stanford's clinical offerings. Based in East Palo Alto, the CLC provides students with the opportunity to provide direct legal services to low-income residents, while thinking critically about the role of lawyers and lawyering in addressing the problems of America's so-called "working poor." The Clinic's practice is in four areas: (1) housing (eviction defense and Section 8 termination); (2) wage and hour and related workers' rights; (3) social security and disability benefits; and (4) criminal record expungement. Each student handles his or her own caseload, which is comprised of cases matters in all of the practice areas. The practice areas are selected and designed to lie at the intersection where the community's unmet legal needs and students' learning needs correspond. The clinic's docket is fundamentally a trial docket. Students have first-chair responsibility for their cases, and perform all of the lawyering tasks necessary to advance their clients' interests, including interviewing, counseling, negotiation, fact investigation, legal research, and representation in the court and agency settings that hear the clients' cases. Skills emphasized include those trial lawyering skills, as well as time management and developing client-centered lawyering practices. Students may also have the chance to participate in outreach or policy-level projects, such as representing the clinic on a state or regional committee on a substantive issue, doing community education workshops at sites around the Peninsula, and/or legislative research and advocacy. In the clinic seminar and in regular supervision, students are encouraged to interrogate the effectiveness of the legal system at delivering "justice" for their clients and to explore creative ways that legal knowledge can be deployed to attack the social problems attendant to low wages, substandard and unstable housing, and other features of low-income life in Silicon Valley. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses -- The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Clinical case/project work, seminar preparation and participation, attendance, reflection papers and project.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 902B: Community Law Clinic: Clinical Methods

The CLC is the closest thing to a general legal services office among Stanford's clinical offerings. Based in East Palo Alto, the CLC provides students with the opportunity to provide direct legal services to low-income residents, while thinking critically about the role of lawyers and lawyering in addressing the problems of America's so-called "working poor." The Clinic's practice is in four areas: (1) housing (eviction defense and Section 8 termination); (2) wage and hour and related workers' rights; (3) social security and disability benefits; and (4) criminal record expungement. Each student handles his or her own caseload, which is comprised of cases matters in all of the practice areas. The practice areas are selected and designed to lie at the intersection where the community's unmet legal needs and students' learning needs correspond. The clinic's docket is fundamentally a trial docket. Students have first-chair responsibility for their cases, and perform all of the lawyering t more »
The CLC is the closest thing to a general legal services office among Stanford's clinical offerings. Based in East Palo Alto, the CLC provides students with the opportunity to provide direct legal services to low-income residents, while thinking critically about the role of lawyers and lawyering in addressing the problems of America's so-called "working poor." The Clinic's practice is in four areas: (1) housing (eviction defense and Section 8 termination); (2) wage and hour and related workers' rights; (3) social security and disability benefits; and (4) criminal record expungement. Each student handles his or her own caseload, which is comprised of cases matters in all of the practice areas. The practice areas are selected and designed to lie at the intersection where the community's unmet legal needs and students' learning needs correspond. The clinic's docket is fundamentally a trial docket. Students have first-chair responsibility for their cases, and perform all of the lawyering tasks necessary to advance their clients' interests, including interviewing, counseling, negotiation, fact investigation, legal research, and representation in the court and agency settings that hear the clients' cases. Skills emphasized include those trial lawyering skills, as well as time management and developing client-centered lawyering practices. Students may also have the chance to participate in outreach or policy-level projects, such as representing the clinic on a state or regional committee on a substantive issue, doing community education workshops at sites around the Peninsula, and/or legislative research and advocacy. In the clinic seminar and in regular supervision, students are encouraged to interrogate the effectiveness of the legal system at delivering "justice" for their clients and to explore creative ways that legal knowledge can be deployed to attack the social problems attendant to low wages, substandard and unstable housing, and other features of low-income life in Silicon Valley. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses -- The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Clinical case/project work, seminar preparation and participation, attendance, reflection papers and project.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit
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