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261 - 270 of 475 results for: LAW

LAW 4045: Digital Technology and Law: Foundations

Taught by a team of law and engineering faculty, this unique interdisciplinary course will empower students across the University to work together and exercise leadership on critically important debates at the intersection of law and digital technology. Designed as an accessible survey, the course will equip students with two powerful bases of knowledge: (i) a working technical grasp of key digital technologies (e.g., AI and machine learning, internet structure, encryption, blockchain); and (ii) basic fluency in the key legal frameworks implicated by each (e.g., privacy, cybersecurity, anti-discrimination, free speech, torts, procedural fairness). Substantively, the course will be organized into modules focused on distinct law-tech intersections, including: platform regulation, speech, and intermediary liability; algorithmic bias and civil rights; autonomous systems, safety, and tort liability; "smart" contracting; data privacy and consumer protection; "legal tech," litigation, and acc more »
Taught by a team of law and engineering faculty, this unique interdisciplinary course will empower students across the University to work together and exercise leadership on critically important debates at the intersection of law and digital technology. Designed as an accessible survey, the course will equip students with two powerful bases of knowledge: (i) a working technical grasp of key digital technologies (e.g., AI and machine learning, internet structure, encryption, blockchain); and (ii) basic fluency in the key legal frameworks implicated by each (e.g., privacy, cybersecurity, anti-discrimination, free speech, torts, procedural fairness). Substantively, the course will be organized into modules focused on distinct law-tech intersections, including: platform regulation, speech, and intermediary liability; algorithmic bias and civil rights; autonomous systems, safety, and tort liability; "smart" contracting; data privacy and consumer protection; "legal tech," litigation, and access to justice; government use of AI; and encryption and criminal procedure. Each module will be explored via a mix of technical and legal instruction, case study discussions, in-class practical exercises, and guest speakers from industry, government, academe, and civil society. Law students will emerge from the course with a basic understanding of core digital technologies and related legal frameworks and a roadmap of curricular and career pathways one might follow to pursue each area further. Students from elsewhere in the University, from engineering to business to the social sciences and beyond, will emerge with an enhanced capacity to critically assess the legal and policy implications of new digital technologies and the ways society can work to ensure those technologies serve the public good. All students will learn to work together across disciplinary divides to solve technical, legal, and practical problems. There are no course prerequisites, and no prior legal or technical training will be assumed. Students will be responsible for short discussion papers or a final paper. This class is cross-listed in the University and undergraduates and graduates are eligible to take it. Consent Application for Non-Law Students: We will try to accommodate all students interested in the course. But to facilitate planning and confirm interest, please fill out a consent application (available at TBA) by March 13, 2020. Applications received after March 13 will be considered on a rolling basis. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Engstrom, D. (PI)

LAW 4046: Big Data: Privacy, Property and Security

Governments generally organize the collection and exploitation of personal and commercial data under three regulatory silos: privacy law, cybersecurity rules and intellectual property laws. The considerable leakage between these three regulatory regimes complicates not only the formulation of national data policies, but also the regulation of cross-border data flows. This seminar will explore the regulatory regimes for big data, and the conflicts and overlaps between them, with attention to opportunities for coordinating national policies through global trade arrangements. Student papers will be expected to focus either on identification of overlaps and conflicts between regulatory regimes or the development of national or global policies for resolving overlaps and conflicts. Class sessions will combine discussion of assigned readings, guest lecturers from industry and student presentation of papers. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, final research paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

LAW 4047: Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change

Examination of recent developments in computing technology and platforms through the lenses of philosophy, public policy, social science, and engineering. Course is organized around four main units: algorithmic decision-making and bias; data privacy and civil liberties; artificial intelligence and autonomous systems; and the power of private computing platforms. Each unit considers the promise, perils, rights, and responsibilities at play in technological developments. Prerequisite: CS106A. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, written assignments, coding assignments, and final exam. Cross-listed with Communication ( COMM 180), Computer Science ( CS 182), Ethics in Society ( ETHICSOC 182), Philosophy ( PHIL 82), Political Science ( POLISCI 182), Public Policy ( PUBLPOL 182).
Terms: Win | Units: 4

LAW 4048: Regulating Internet Speech Platforms

Internet platforms like Google and Facebook play an enormous role in our online speech and information environment today. This class will review the intermediary liability laws that shape platforms' decisions about online content, and examine how successfully those laws achieve their goals. Students will be encouraged to think pragmatically about the legal, operational, and product design choices platforms may make in response to particular laws, drawing on the instructor's experience handling such questions as Associate General Counsel at Google. Readings and discussions will focus primarily on current US law, with some attention to European laws and to proposed or pending legislation. Important themes of the class include Constitutional and human rights constraints on intermediary liability laws; legal limits (or lack thereof) on platforms' enforcement of privatized speech rules under their Community Guidelines or Terms of Service; global enforcement of national laws requiring platfo more »
Internet platforms like Google and Facebook play an enormous role in our online speech and information environment today. This class will review the intermediary liability laws that shape platforms' decisions about online content, and examine how successfully those laws achieve their goals. Students will be encouraged to think pragmatically about the legal, operational, and product design choices platforms may make in response to particular laws, drawing on the instructor's experience handling such questions as Associate General Counsel at Google. Readings and discussions will focus primarily on current US law, with some attention to European laws and to proposed or pending legislation. Important themes of the class include Constitutional and human rights constraints on intermediary liability laws; legal limits (or lack thereof) on platforms' enforcement of privatized speech rules under their Community Guidelines or Terms of Service; global enforcement of national laws requiring platforms to remove content; and connections between platform liability and other areas of law such as consumer protection or privacy. Students will be responsible for three written assignments. The longest will be a final paper of 15 pages. The other two will both be short responses to the week's reading. Up to three students, with consent of instructor, will have the option to write an independent research paper for 3 units. After the term begins, students (max 3) accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students will be graded based on Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, and a Final Paper. Admission to the class is based on lottery, but in admitting students from the waitlist the instructor may prioritize based on students' degree programs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Keller, D. (PI)

LAW 4049: Hack Lab

This course aims to give students a solid understanding of the most common types of attacks used in cybercrime and cyberwarfare. Taught by a long-time cybersecurity practitioner, a recovering cyberlaw litigator, and a group of hearty, motivated TAs, each session will begin with a lecture covering the basics of an area of technology and how that technology has been misused in the past. Students will then complete a lab section, with the guidance of the instructor and assistants, where they attack a known insecure system using techniques and tools seen in the field. Each week, there will be a second lecture on the legal and policy impacts of the technologies and techniques we cover. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a basic understanding of some of the most common offensive techniques in use today as well as a comprehensive overview of the most important aspects of cyberpolicy and law. No computer science background is required. All students must have access to a Wi more »
This course aims to give students a solid understanding of the most common types of attacks used in cybercrime and cyberwarfare. Taught by a long-time cybersecurity practitioner, a recovering cyberlaw litigator, and a group of hearty, motivated TAs, each session will begin with a lecture covering the basics of an area of technology and how that technology has been misused in the past. Students will then complete a lab section, with the guidance of the instructor and assistants, where they attack a known insecure system using techniques and tools seen in the field. Each week, there will be a second lecture on the legal and policy impacts of the technologies and techniques we cover. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a basic understanding of some of the most common offensive techniques in use today as well as a comprehensive overview of the most important aspects of cyberpolicy and law. No computer science background is required. All students must have access to a Windows, Mac OS X or Linux laptop. Students must enroll in the lecture as well as one Computer Lab (Lab meets 50 minutes once a week). Special Instructions: This class is limited to 120 students with 30 spots for SLS students. If more than 30 SLS students wish to enroll, instructor permission is required. Elements used in grading: Class participation, written assignments, take-home midterm, and a final exam. Cross-listed with International Policy ( INTLPOL 268). Law students see INTLPOL listing for Computer Lab section meeting times.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 4050: AI and Rule of Law: A Global Perspective

Advances in machine learning, big data, networked communications, and computing are transforming our world and fueling calls for regulation. This course--a joint venture of a Stanford law professor and a former Member of the European Parliament and leading voice on tech regulation--offers a global perspective on the profound legal and governance challenges posed by the new digital technologies. Students will emerge with an understanding of how tech is reshaping the global distribution of political authority, rights, and resources, the existing state of law and regulation in the U.S., Europe, China, and elsewhere, and the new democratic governance models that are emerging in response. Each class session will feature one or more distinguished speakers from around the world drawn from the ranks of government officials, judges, activists, and academics who work in the fields of human rights, privacy, free speech, trade, and national security. There are no course prerequisites, whether in l more »
Advances in machine learning, big data, networked communications, and computing are transforming our world and fueling calls for regulation. This course--a joint venture of a Stanford law professor and a former Member of the European Parliament and leading voice on tech regulation--offers a global perspective on the profound legal and governance challenges posed by the new digital technologies. Students will emerge with an understanding of how tech is reshaping the global distribution of political authority, rights, and resources, the existing state of law and regulation in the U.S., Europe, China, and elsewhere, and the new democratic governance models that are emerging in response. Each class session will feature one or more distinguished speakers from around the world drawn from the ranks of government officials, judges, activists, and academics who work in the fields of human rights, privacy, free speech, trade, and national security. There are no course prerequisites, whether in law or otherwise. Students will be responsible for one-page responses to each week's readings and a research paper to be turned in at the spring paper deadline. Students can take the course for 2 or 3 units, depending on research paper length. This class is cross-listed in the university (TBA), and undergraduates and graduates are eligible to take it. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3

LAW 5001: China Law and Business

(Formerly Law 245) China's adoption of its open door policy in 1978 to welcome foreign investment started the country's forty-year trajectory of legal reforms in different areas, including foreign investment, intellectual property, dispute resolution, and antimonopoly law. The launch of the Belt and Road Initiative in 2013, China's ambitious global economic plan, has taken legal reforms in the country to another level, as numerous measures are being undertaken to ensure the success of this initiative, which is associated with tremendous legal challenges. This introductory course is designed to provide an overview of the Chinese legal system and to discuss legal and business issues related to the above-mentioned economic evolution spearheaded by China but having an impact around the world. The course will specifically examine Chinese legal rules and principles in select business-related areas, including intellectual property, dispute resolution, foreign investment vehicles, mergers and more »
(Formerly Law 245) China's adoption of its open door policy in 1978 to welcome foreign investment started the country's forty-year trajectory of legal reforms in different areas, including foreign investment, intellectual property, dispute resolution, and antimonopoly law. The launch of the Belt and Road Initiative in 2013, China's ambitious global economic plan, has taken legal reforms in the country to another level, as numerous measures are being undertaken to ensure the success of this initiative, which is associated with tremendous legal challenges. This introductory course is designed to provide an overview of the Chinese legal system and to discuss legal and business issues related to the above-mentioned economic evolution spearheaded by China but having an impact around the world. The course will specifically examine Chinese legal rules and principles in select business-related areas, including intellectual property, dispute resolution, foreign investment vehicles, mergers and acquisitions, antimonopoly law, and artificial intelligence. Through active class participation and analysis of legal and business cases, students will learn both the law on the books and the law in action, as well as strategies that Chinese and international businesses alike can use to overcome limitations in the Chinese legal system. Leaders from the law and business communities will be invited to share their experiences and insights. This course is particularly suitable for law students, MBA students, and students enrolled in the East Asian Studies Program. Undergraduates who have permission from the instructor may also take this course. A Stanford Non-Law Student Course Registration Form is available on the SLS Registrar's Office website. Elements used in grading: class participation (20%), team project (40%), and extended take-home exam (40%). For the team project component, students will work with another student enrolled in the class to produce an analysis of a judicial case in China and discuss, for example, the implications of the related Chinese legal principles for businesses and/or major differences between these principles and similar U.S. legal principles. Quality team projects may have the opportunity to be included in the professional journal published by the China Guiding Cases Project ("CGCP"), which is led by Dr. Mei Gechlik, the instructor, and her global team of nearly 200 members. Team projects selected for publication will receive editorial input from the CGCP and authors may have a chance to present their papers at CGCP events.
Last offered: Spring 2019

LAW 5002: Comparative Law

(Formerly Law 311) The big question in comparative law today - and one that is of key importance to anyone interested in international law - is whether we are currently witnessing a convergence of national legal systems. This course examines this question, as well as the related problem of American exceptionalism, by exploring key aspects of contemporary Western European legal systems. We will study a range of legal institutions and practices, including such topics as legal education, the role of judges and judging, constitutional courts and judicial review, criminal procedure and punishment, and the rise and regulation of consumer culture. In contrast to the traditional comparative law course, we will also devote substantial time to such pressing public-law questions as racial equality and affirmative action, gender equality and sexual harassment, and church-state relations. In lieu of the final exam, students may opt to write four response papers to the assigned readings (each 5 to 7 double-spaced pages long). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation; and exam or response papers.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 5005: European Union Law

The U.S. and the European Union (which comprises 28 European states and 500 million people) have the largest bilateral trade relationship in the world. Over 50% of the world's GDP is generated on the Transatlantic Marketplace. U.S. companies rely on the EU market for more than half of their global foreign profits, and U.S. investment in the EU is currently three times greater than U.S. investment in the whole of Asia. In recent years, this has tremendously heightened the need for a sound understanding of the legal system of the EU, especially for business and technology lawyers. Responding to this need, this course will, first, examine the internationally unique legal system of the EU as such, as it is applicable to any field of substantive and procedural EU law. Thus, we will look at the legal nature and the different sources of EU law and its relationship with the national law of the EU Member States, including European human rights and fundamental rights protection standards. We wil more »
The U.S. and the European Union (which comprises 28 European states and 500 million people) have the largest bilateral trade relationship in the world. Over 50% of the world's GDP is generated on the Transatlantic Marketplace. U.S. companies rely on the EU market for more than half of their global foreign profits, and U.S. investment in the EU is currently three times greater than U.S. investment in the whole of Asia. In recent years, this has tremendously heightened the need for a sound understanding of the legal system of the EU, especially for business and technology lawyers. Responding to this need, this course will, first, examine the internationally unique legal system of the EU as such, as it is applicable to any field of substantive and procedural EU law. Thus, we will look at the legal nature and the different sources of EU law and its relationship with the national law of the EU Member States, including European human rights and fundamental rights protection standards. We will cover the relevant EU law enforcement actions including state liability issues for breach of EU law as well as the jurisdiction of both European Courts and relevant remedies in national courts. Secondly, we will explore the legal framework governing business activities in the EU, from the perspective of a business entity as an internationally operating actor in a European business environment. In this context, we will focus on the most essential fields of EU business law, i.e. (a) the four fundamental economic freedoms of the European Internal Market for goods, services, capital, and persons (enterprises, workforce, immigration), including the legal and economic implications of Brexit, (b) EU competition (antitrust) law, and (c) the new digital European Internal Market and EU data protection and privacy laws. Special attention will be given to the question how companies established outside the EU can efficiently use EU business law to pursue their interests in the EU. Additional study and research opportunities for students in EU law, building on this course, can be found on the SLS EU Law Initiatives website ( law.stanford.edu/transatlantic-technology-law-forum/european-union-law-initiatives). Special Instructions: After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer, with consent of the instructor, from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. Grades for students enrolled in section (01) will be based on writing assignments. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the paper length. Elements used in grading: Writing assignments or research paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Fina, S. (PI)

LAW 5006: International Business Transactions and Litigation

Lawyers are increasingly asked to advise clients with global operations: Twitter reacts to free speech limitations in Turkey, governments around the world regulate Facebook's user data, Nike weighs the legal risk from factory fires in Bangladesh, investors consider spending billions in China without legal protections common elsewhere, companies worry about the consequences of being complicit in human rights violations, governments threaten to expropriate intellectual and real property, and US litigators face court rulings abroad that may conflict with the orders of US courts. What legal problems arise when firms go global? Through a series of case studies, we put you in the driver's seat and ask you to consider the challenges of doing business around the world, subject to multiple and sometimes inconsistent national laws. We will examine how treaties, international agreements, and informal norms can constrain or supplement national laws and review the risks of doing business in nations more »
Lawyers are increasingly asked to advise clients with global operations: Twitter reacts to free speech limitations in Turkey, governments around the world regulate Facebook's user data, Nike weighs the legal risk from factory fires in Bangladesh, investors consider spending billions in China without legal protections common elsewhere, companies worry about the consequences of being complicit in human rights violations, governments threaten to expropriate intellectual and real property, and US litigators face court rulings abroad that may conflict with the orders of US courts. What legal problems arise when firms go global? Through a series of case studies, we put you in the driver's seat and ask you to consider the challenges of doing business around the world, subject to multiple and sometimes inconsistent national laws. We will examine how treaties, international agreements, and informal norms can constrain or supplement national laws and review the risks of doing business in nations whose laws are ineffective or unreliable. We also consider some of the costs of globalization. We'll hear from current or former general counsel from global firms such as Intel and G.E. Special Instructions: Students who take this course have priority in the lottery for field study trips organized by the law school in September and during Spring Break. Elements used in grading: a short paper, class participation, and written assignments. This class is open to ALL students (except 1Ls), and is not limited to students enrolled in the Global Quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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