2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

61 - 70 of 102 results for: LAW

LAW 4016: Patent Litigation Workshop

(Formerly Law 322) This course simulates the strategy and pretrial preparation of a patent lawsuit. The course materials include information typical to a patent lawsuit: a patent, file history, prior art, and information regarding the accused product. Students will represent either the patentee or the accused infringer. Students will draft claim construction charts, infringement charts, take and defend depositions, and brief and argue claim construction and motions for summary judgment of infringement and invalidity. Some knowledge of patent law is presumed. Special Instructions: IP: Patents ( Law 326) is a prerequisite for this course, but can be taken coterminously. Students must attend the first class session (or contact the instructor) or they will be dropped from the class or waitlist. Elements used in grading: Attendance, participation, writing assignments, exercises and oral arguments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Galloway, M. (PI)

LAW 4018: Intellectual Property: International and Comparative Copyright

(Formerly Law 745) Few copyright licenses today fail to reach across national borders, and copyright litigation increasingly calls for a general understanding of foreign copyright law. This course will focus on the counselling considerations that surround the exploitation of music, film, literature and other copyrighted works in foreign markets through licensing, litigation, or both. The course will survey the principal legal systems and international treaty arrangements for the protection of copyrighted works as well as the procedural questions that lie at the threshold of protection. Elements used in grading: class participation; two reflection papers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

LAW 4020: Lawyering for Innovation: A Case Study

(Formerly Law 769) Strategic lawyering in the 21st century requires a combination of critical skillsets, including facility with technology, product design, partnerships, dispute resolution, and policy. No issue in the digital age has demonstrated this better than the history of and litigation surrounding Google Books. For over a decade, from the inception of the product to the resolution of its legal issues, lawyers were integrally involved with engineers and the business every step of the way. They helped design its features, defend it from lawsuits, craft a settlement, and advocate complementary policy positions. On a broader level, the history of ebooks is a microcosm of the opportunities and challenges of the digital age: new technologies to reproduce and distribute works, changing consumer norms, massive disruptions to economic interests, evolving concepts of fair use, increased access to information, fears about piracy, and threats to competition. Every one of these issues requires skilled lawyering in close partnership with business leadership. This seminar will focus on strategic lawyering at the cutting edge of innovation by closely studying, among other things, the history of Google Books and the evolution of copyright in the digital age. We will look at how leading businesses, including Google, Apple, Amazon and Microsoft, have each used law, litigation, and policy as tools to advance their business interests. We will focus on developments related to ebooks, and also study analogous issues involving the music, movie, and newspaper industries. The seminar will include guest speakers who have led legal strategies to further innovation. Some copyright experience is helpful but not essential. The course is open to graduate students throughout the university, especially the Graduate School of Business, the Department of Communication, and the Journalism Program. Special Instructions: Students on the waitlist for the course will be admitted if spots are available on the basis of their position on the waitlist and degree of study. Elements used in grading: Grading will be based upon weekly reflections, class participation, and a short final paper (or, for those opting for Research credit, a longer paper based on independent research). A version of this course was taught at Stanford Law School in 2015 and Harvard Law School in 2016. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Rubin, T. (PI)

LAW 4029: Video Game Law

This seminar discusses a variety of legal issues raised by video games and game platforms. We will devote substantial attention to intellectual property matters, but will also include business and licensing issues, tort law, the First Amendment, and legal issues presented by virtual reality. Students will write and present an original research paper on a topic related to the class. This is a 3-unit seminar that satisfies the R requirement. Introduction to Intellectual Property or equivalent is a prerequisite. Enrollment is limited to 12 students, and will be by consent of the instructors. Interested students should submit a paragraph explaining their background and interest in the course. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 5007: International Business Negotiation

(Formerly Law 504) This course is structured around a quarter-long, simulated negotiation exercise which provides an in-depth study of the structuring and negotiating of an international business transaction. This class will be taught in counterpart with a class at Berkeley Law School. Students in this class will represent a U.S. pharmaceutical company, and the students in the class at Berkeley will represent an African agricultural production company. The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by the pharmaceutical company that uses the cassava produced by the African agricultural production company. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, a licensing agreement or a long term supply contract. The negotiations between the two classes will take place through written exchanges and through real-time negotiation which will be conducted both in-person and via videoconferences. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity (i) to experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, (ii) to study the business and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation, (iii) to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, (iv) to learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, (v) to give students experience in drafting communications, and (vi) to provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice with an unfamiliar opposing party (here, the students at Berkeley). Students will also learn about the legal and business issues that may arise in joint ventures, supply agreements and licensing agreements. The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiations process. Students are expected to spend time outside of class, working in teams, to prepare for class discussions involving the written exchanges, as well as preparing for the live negotiations. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations, as well as the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact on the negotiations. In addition to the regular Monday class, classes will meet for the live negotiations on two Thursday evenings on-campus at 7:00 PM (10/19 and 10/26) and three Saturday mornings at 10:30 AM (10/7, 10/14 and 11/11) in the San Francisco office of DLA Piper (555 Mission Street; close to Montgomery St. BART station). Due to the Thursday and Saturday classes, this class will conclude on November 13. The course will be limited by lottery to twelve (12) law students (additional students from business or engineering may also participate). Attention Waitlist Students: Students on the waitlist for the course will be admitted if spots are available on the basis of their position on the waitlist and degree of study; all waitlist students are encouraged to attend the first class and will be notified as spaces become available. Attention Non-Law Students: You must complete and submit a Non-Law Student Course Add Request Form to the Law School Registrar's Office (Room 100). See Stanford Non-Law Student Course Registration on the SLS Registrar's Office website. Prerequisites: A course in basic negotiations (e.g., Law 7821) or comparable prior experience is recommended. A primer on basic negotiations skills will be offered at a time TBD as an alternative for students who have not had a prior negotiations class or experience. Elements used in grading: Class participation, written assignments and final paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 5011: International Investment Law

(Formerly Law 583) The past few decades have seen a dramatic increase in the number of bilateral investment treaties and other agreements with investment-related provisions (such as NAFTA), followed by a sharp rise in the number of disputes between private investors and sovereign states pursuant to investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) provisions. The rise of international investment arbitration has generated a new and exciting practice area in global law firms. This course will cover four broad areas: (I) the historical and policy origins of international investment law; (II) the substantive obligations and standards governing the investor-state relationship; (III) the investor-state arbitration process; and (IV) current controversies over the legitimacy and desirability of ISDS. The course uses materials from international investment treaty texts, case law, and commentaries to enable students to evaluate and apply legal doctrine to future situations. Students may choose between a series of weekly response papers or a larger research paper, and will serve as discussion facilitators along with the instructors. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructors. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and paper(s).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 5023: The Rule of Law - The Foundation of Functional Communities

(Formerly Law 679) We will seek to determine a useful meaning of the notion of the rule of law to identify some measurement of adherence and to explore the importance of the rule of law in terms of economic, socio-political and human development. We will focus on accountable government; just laws; open processes for the enactment, administration and enforcement of laws and effective dispute resolution. Readings and discussion will include the works of ancient philosophers, political theorists and jurists from the 17th to the 20th century, modern political economists and contemporary scholars. This seminar will feature several experts in the field as guest lectures and requires three reaction papers from all participants. Elements Used in Grading: Class participation, written assignments and series of short reaction papers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Neukom, W. (PI)

LAW 5027: Social Conflict, Social Justice, and Human Rights in 21st Century Latin America

This course will consider significant sources of social conflict, efforts to achieve social justice and the relevance and impact of human rights norms and oversight mechanisms in Latin America in the 21st Century. Led by Prof. James Cavallaro, the course will involve weekly sessions, each focusing on a particular topic. Readings will provide the basis for short student reflection papers to be prepared in advance of each session. The class will generally involve an initial presentation, followed by seminar-style discussion. Topics will include the human rights crisis facing Mexico, in particular, forced disappearances, summary executions and torture. We will consider, for example, the forced disappearance of 43 students in September 2014 (Ayotzinapa) in at least one session. The current political and human rights crisis facing Venezuela will be considered, likely by an expert guest speaker. So too will the peace process in Colombia and the Special Jurisdiction for Peace. Other sessions will consider social conflict and justice issues across the region. These issues will include the resurgence of populism in the United States and Latin America and its effects on social justice and human rights, the continued relevance of the Organization of American States and its human rights bodies, migration and human rights, the rights of indigenous and traditional peoples and models of development, among others. Elements used in grading: Grades will be based on class participation, and either several short reflection papers (section 01) or a final paper (section 02). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

LAW 5101: Afghanistan Legal Education Project (ALEP) Seminar

(Formerly 259A) The Afghanistan Legal Education Project (ALEP) Seminar is only open to student preselected in spring 2017. The ALEP Seminar will begin with an intensive bootcamp taught by ALEP leadership and members of the law faculty at American University of Afghanistan (AUAF). We will explore the Afghan sociopolitical and legal context, rule of law efforts and challenges in Afghanistan, and the role of legal education in legal development. Participants will learn from Afghan law professors about Shari'a law, customary law, Afghan civil law, and the challenges presented by Afghanistan's pluralistic legal system in preparation to work on legal curriculum to be taught at AUAF. The bootcamp will be highly participatory and requires full attendance. During the remainder of the quarter, participants will receive training in curriculum creation and organizational development in preparation for authoring an Afghan legal textbook and assuming ALEP programmatic responsibilities. Elements used in grading: Grading is based on mandatory attendance of the boot camp, participation, assignments, and authoring a new chapter and/or revision of an existing textbook chapter. Consent Process: Only students selected in spring 2017 have consent to take the ALEP Seminar. Their names will be given to the Registrar, who will automatically enroll them in the course in fall 2017.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 5103: State-Building and the Rule of Law Seminar

(Formerly Law 259) The State-Building and Rule of Law Seminar is centrally concerned with bridging theory and practice. The seminar introduces the key theories relevant to state-building generally and strengthening the rule of law in particular. This course explores the multidisciplinary nature of development -- through readings, lectures, guest lectures, and seminar discussions -- and asks how lawyers fit in and contribute to the process. Essentially, in a given context, what is the relationship of law to political, social, and economic change? This course will employ case studies as a way to analyze rule-of-law practice within development theory. The set of developing countries considered within the scope of this workshop is broad. It includes, among others, states engaged in post-conflict reconstruction, e.g., Cambodia, Timor Leste, Rwanda, Iraq, Sierra Leone; states still in conflict, e.g., Afghanistan, Somalia; the poorest states of the world that may not fall neatly into the categories of conflict or post-conflict, e.g., Nepal, Haiti; least developed states that are not marked by high levels of violent conflict at all, e.g., Bhutan; and more developed states at critical stages of transition, e.g., Tunisia, Georgia, Hungary. Grading is based on participation, a presentation of research or a proposal, and, in consultation with the professor, a research paper. The research paper may be a group project (Section 01) graded MP/R/F or an individual in-depth research proposal either of which could be the basis for future field research (Section 02) graded H/P/R/F. Students approved for Section 01 or Section 02 may receive EL credit or R credit. Automatic grading penalty waived for submission of the final work products. CONSENT APPLICATION: The seminar is open by consent to up to sixteen (16) JD, SPILS, and LLM students, and graduate students from other departments within Stanford University. To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints