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21 - 30 of 102 results for: LAW

LAW 884: Externship, Special Circumstances

(Formerly Law 473) Following approval of a student's application, the Special Circumstances Externship Program (SCEP) allows second and third year students to work for credit for one quarter in non-profit public interest, public policy, and government agencies outside of the Bay Area. Standards for approval of a SCEP placement are similar to those for Directed Research proposals, although they are higher. Because there is a preference for local civil and criminal SEP placements (see Law 882 and Law 883), your SCEP proposal must explain (a) how it meets the goals of the externship program; and (b) why a similar project cannot be accomplished in one of the placements offered in the Bay Area. SCEP placements outside the Bay Area must be full-time. Students wishing to undertake a SCEP placement obtain the supervision of a faculty member who will oversee their externship and an accompanying tutorial. For a full description of the SCEP, students should read the Externship Handbook, which is available from the Levin Center for Public Service and Public Interest Law or online at: http://www.law.stanford.edu/organizations/programs-and-centers/john-and-terry-levin-center-for-public-service-and-public-interest-law/externship-program-0 . Students wishing to enroll in an externship must meet the various requirements that are set out in the Handbook. An externship that otherwise meets the criteria for obtaining EL credit will be approved for EL credit when the field placement provides specialized experience complementary to a student's intended career path and comparable benefits cannot be obtained through other EL coursework at Stanford. Grading Elements used: Full participation and attendance, satisfactory evaluation by field placement supervisor, weekly reflection papers of three to five pages, and a final reflection paper of a length to be determined by your faculty supervisor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 12

LAW 902: Advanced Community Law Clinic

(Formerly Law 642) The Advanced Community Law Clinic offers law students who already have some significant civil clinical experience the opportunity to work under supervision on more advanced projects and cases being handled by the Stanford Community Law Clinic, including litigation and other matters. Advanced Clinic students will also work with Clinical Supervising Attorneys to provide direction and guidance to those enrolled in the Community Law Clinic for the first time, in areas in which Advanced Clinic students have already acquired some expertise. In addition, Advanced Clinic students may function as team leaders on larger projects in which the Clinic is engaged. Advanced students may arrange with the instructor to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 overall clinical credits, however, during the course of the student's law school career. Special Instructions: Completion of the Community Law Clinic ( Law 902A,B,C) or its equivalent is a prerequisite for the advanced clinic. Elements used in grading: Participation, reflective paper and project.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 904: Advanced Criminal Defense Clinic

(Formerly Law 418) Advanced clinic allows students who have taken the Criminal Defense Clinic to continue working on cases. Participation in case rounds is required. Advanced clinic may be taken for 2-7 units. Students may not enroll in any clinic (basic or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. Students must have taken Criminal Defense Clinic ( Law 904A,B,C). Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and case work.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 904A: Criminal Defense Clinic: Clinical Practice

(Formerly Law 408A) Students in the Criminal Defense Clinic represent local residents in a wide range of misdemeanor cases in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties. Students are California Bar Certified and thus appear in court and argue cases with faculty standing by. Students take the lead role in all aspects of case development, including interviewing clients and witnesses, investigating facts, developing case strategy, negotiating with prosecutors, drafting and arguing motions, and occasionally trying cases before judges and juries. Common charges include drug use and possession, assault, theft, and vandalism. While students have primary responsibility for all aspects of their cases, all work is closely supervised. The Criminal Defense Clinic is an intensive, fast-paced, and demanding program of education and practical skills, taught through introductory training and ongoing workshops and skills practicums. The Clinic also addresses broader systemic issues such as implicit bias in the legal system, immigration consequences, economic disparities, and addiction. The goal of the Clinic is to train students how to conduct a criminal case while engaging in thoughtful reflection and providing holistic representation. The Clinic's broader goal is to provide lawyering skills and habits of mind transferrable to any student's chosen field of practice. While the work is often challenging and sometimes heartbreaking, it offers students a unique opportunity to put their skills, intellect, and compassion to use by serving people in a moment of great need. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend approximately five inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and case work and professionalism.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4

LAW 904B: Criminal Defense Clinic: Clinical Methods

(Formerly Law 408B) Students in the Criminal Defense Clinic represent local residents in a wide range of misdemeanor cases in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties. Students are California Bar Certified and thus appear in court and argue cases with faculty standing by. Students take the lead role in all aspects of case development, including interviewing clients and witnesses, investigating facts, developing case strategy, negotiating with prosecutors, drafting and arguing motions, and occasionally trying cases before judges and juries. Common charges include drug use and possession, assault, theft, and vandalism. While students have primary responsibility for all aspects of their cases, all work is closely supervised. The Criminal Defense Clinic is an intensive, fast-paced, and demanding program of education and practical skills, taught through introductory training and ongoing workshops and skills practicums. The Clinic also addresses broader systemic issues such as implicit bias in the legal system, immigration consequences, economic disparities, and addiction. The goal of the Clinic is to train students how to conduct a criminal case while engaging in thoughtful reflection and providing holistic representation. The Clinic's broader goal is to provide lawyering skills and habits of mind transferrable to any student's chosen field of practice. While the work is often challenging and sometimes heartbreaking, it offers students a unique opportunity to put their skills, intellect, and compassion to use by serving people in a moment of great need. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend approximately five inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and case work and professionalism.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4

LAW 904C: Criminal Defense Clinic: Clinical Coursework

(Formerly Law 408C) Students in the Criminal Defense Clinic represent local residents in a wide range of misdemeanor cases in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties. Students are California Bar Certified and thus appear in court and argue cases with faculty standing by. Students take the lead role in all aspects of case development, including interviewing clients and witnesses, investigating facts, developing case strategy, negotiating with prosecutors, drafting and arguing motions, and occasionally trying cases before judges and juries. Common charges include drug use and possession, assault, theft, and vandalism. While students have primary responsibility for all aspects of their cases, all work is closely supervised. The Criminal Defense Clinic is an intensive, fast-paced, and demanding program of education and practical skills, taught through introductory training and ongoing workshops and skills practicums. The Clinic also addresses broader systemic issues such as implicit bias in the legal system, immigration consequences, economic disparities, and addiction. The goal of the Clinic is to train students how to conduct a criminal case while engaging in thoughtful reflection and providing holistic representation. The Clinic's broader goal is to provide lawyering skills and habits of mind transferrable to any student's chosen field of practice. While the work is often challenging and sometimes heartbreaking, it offers students a unique opportunity to put their skills, intellect, and compassion to use by serving people in a moment of great need. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend approximately five inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and case work and professionalism.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4

LAW 908: Advanced Environmental Law Clinic

(Formerly Law 623) The Advanced Environmental Law Clinic provides students who have already taken the Environmental Law Clinic the opportunity to continue intense individual project work. Advanced students often work on matters they worked on as full-time students, but they also have the chance to work on new matters and develop new skills. Advanced students work closely with supervising faculty on their designated projects and are expected to take increasing responsibility for managing their work and representing clients. In addition, advanced students often serve as mentors to less experienced full-time students and thereby receive training in basic team building and supervision. Advanced students may arrange to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 total clinical units during the course of the student's law school career. Elements used in grading: TBA.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 910: Advanced Immigrants' Rights Clinic

(Formerly Law 274) The Immigrants' Rights Advanced Clinic offers the opportunity for students who have already successfully completed the Immigrants' Rights Clinic to pursue: a specific immigrants' rights advocacy project; advanced individual client representation; and/or working with the clinic director to provide direction/guidance to those enrolled in the Clinic for the first time. All advanced Clinic projects will be jointly designed by the director and the advanced student. Advanced students providing guidance/direction to first-time students will receive additional training on providing supervision. Special instructions: Advanced students are expected to attend the case-rounds portion of the weekly seminar, and to participate as needed in the lecture/discussion portion of the seminar. Advanced students may arrange with the instructor to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 overall clinical units, however, during the course of the student's law school career. Elements used in grading: Attendance and participation in class, project work, writing assignments, and case preparation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 912: Advanced International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic

(Formerly Law 663) The International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Advanced Clinic offers the opportunity for students who have already successfully completed an International Human Rights Clinic to pursue one or more specific projects in conjunction with the Clinic, either independently or in collaboration with colleague(s) enrolled in the regular clinic. Any travel will be strictly contingent on the Advanced Clinical student's availability and the needs of the project. Advanced Clinical students are expected to participate in as much of the regular clinical seminar and seminar simulations as possible given pre-existing scheduling constraints. Advanced students may arrange with the instructor to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 overall clinical units, however, during the course of the student's law school career. Elements used in grading: Project work, writing assignments, case preparation, attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 914: Advanced Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic

(Formerly Law 287) Advanced clinic allows students who have taken the Advanced Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic to continue working on cases. Advanced clinic may be taken for 2-7 units. Students may not enroll in any clinic (basic or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. Elements used in grading: TBA.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit
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