2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

91 - 100 of 123 results for: LAW ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LAW 5207: Foreign Legal Study: Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-14
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

LAW 5210: Foreign Legal Study: National University of Singapore

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-14
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

LAW 5213: Foreign Legal Study: Peking University Law School

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-14
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

LAW 5216: Foreign Legal Study: Waseda University

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-14
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

LAW 5219: Foreign Legal Study: University of Vienna

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-14
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

LAW 5801: Legal Studies Workshop

The Legal Studies Workshop is designed to support students working on a piece of legal scholarship with an eye to publication. The workshop will meet every other week in the fall, winter, and spring quarters, and (we expect) most quarters over the following two years. Students may sign up for as many quarters they wish, and will receive one credit for each quarter they are enrolled. Each session will be devoted to presentations of one or two student works-in-progress. Every student is expected to present his or her own work at least once over the quarters she or he is enrolled in the Workshop, and to provide constructive oral feedback on others' work. We welcome students who are just starting to explore their interest in an academic career; if you have any questions about whether the course is suitable for you, please contact Prof. Barbara Fried (bfried@stanford.edu) or Prof. Bernadette Meyler (bmeyler@ law.stanford.edu). Attendance is mandatory (except of course for extenuating circum more »
The Legal Studies Workshop is designed to support students working on a piece of legal scholarship with an eye to publication. The workshop will meet every other week in the fall, winter, and spring quarters, and (we expect) most quarters over the following two years. Students may sign up for as many quarters they wish, and will receive one credit for each quarter they are enrolled. Each session will be devoted to presentations of one or two student works-in-progress. Every student is expected to present his or her own work at least once over the quarters she or he is enrolled in the Workshop, and to provide constructive oral feedback on others' work. We welcome students who are just starting to explore their interest in an academic career; if you have any questions about whether the course is suitable for you, please contact Prof. Barbara Fried (bfried@stanford.edu) or Prof. Bernadette Meyler (bmeyler@ law.stanford.edu). Attendance is mandatory (except of course for extenuating circumstances). There are no written requirements for the course, and no requirement that the work presented be original to the Workshop. Students may wish to use the Workshop as an opportunity to expand on seminar papers or pursue independent research projects for which they are getting separate credit through one of the research tracks (e.g., directed research, dissertation). Whether students are working on a new project or revising an old, the expectation is that students will develop their topics independently of the course. Students who would like to participate in the Workshop but feel they need help in developing a workable research topic should consult faculty members ahead of time. Elements used in grading: Class participation and attendance. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Classes will be held at one of the professor's home. The specific location will be sent to students prior to the first class meeting.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 5809: Is there an American Legal Canon?

Is there a "canon" of American legal scholarship? And if so, how does it shape our understanding of, or the way we talk about, the law today? In many other academic disciplines, a central element of any course of advanced study is an encounter with a "canon" of some sort. This is a core set of texts that are perceived as foundational, and that are commonly used as reference points for scholarly advances. In other disciplines, the canon can be an object of emulation or criticism. Indeed, the very idea of a "canon" of legal scholarly is often subject to contestation, e.g., given the barriers women and minority scholars have faced. Drawing on the model of those foundational courses in other disciplines, this seminar aims to provide students with a working knowledge of a set of scholarly writings that can plausibly be characterized as an American "canon." At the same time, the seminar aims to elicit from students a critical engagement with this putative "canon." Particular attention is pai more »
Is there a "canon" of American legal scholarship? And if so, how does it shape our understanding of, or the way we talk about, the law today? In many other academic disciplines, a central element of any course of advanced study is an encounter with a "canon" of some sort. This is a core set of texts that are perceived as foundational, and that are commonly used as reference points for scholarly advances. In other disciplines, the canon can be an object of emulation or criticism. Indeed, the very idea of a "canon" of legal scholarly is often subject to contestation, e.g., given the barriers women and minority scholars have faced. Drawing on the model of those foundational courses in other disciplines, this seminar aims to provide students with a working knowledge of a set of scholarly writings that can plausibly be characterized as an American "canon." At the same time, the seminar aims to elicit from students a critical engagement with this putative "canon." Particular attention is paid to the manner in which the canon either includes or marginalizes certain voices. Hence, one part of the seminar involves reading material that might be part of an expanded, more diversely populated canon. The seminar is designed for two kinds of student. First, it is a useful course of study for students either interested in academia or those thinking about whether academia might be the right path for them (and indeed, the seminar is modeled on a course at Chicago designed for prospective academics, or those considering that path). Second, the course is a chance to take a deeper dive into ideas that lurk behind many first-course private-law and public-law courses. During the seminar, students will read and discuss a range of texts, many drawn from Fisher and Kennedy's The Canon of American Legal Thought. Students will be asked to write response papers and to lead discussion on certain readings. The precise set-up of the course will depend, however, on enrollment. Finally, students will also have the option of doing a longer paper for additional credit (section 02). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section 01 (2 units) into section 02 (3 units) with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: class participation, short papers, and optional final research paper. Paper extensions will be granted with instructor permission. No automatic grading penalty for late papers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Huq, A. (PI)

LAW 6001: Legal Ethics

This course will explore issues involving professional responsibility. Topics will include the role of advocates, the adversary system, the conditions of practice, diversity, candor, and confidentiality, conflicts of interest, lawyer-client relationships, regulatory structures, access to justice, pro bono service, and legal education. Special Instructions: Grades will be based on class participation and (1) short reflection essays on the readings and a short research paper or (2) a long paper. A maximum of 10 students will be permitted to write the long paper for R credit. After the term begins, 10 students can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. If more than 10 students apply to write a long paper for R credit, a lottery will be run to determine the 10 students accepted in section (02). This class is designated as fulfilling the Ethics requirement (and the R requirement with instructor consent). Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, and either long paper or short reflection essays on the readings and short research paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Rhode, D. (PI)

LAW 7001: Administrative Law

Federal agencies make an astounding number of policy decisions, engaging in more lawmaking and adjudication than Congress and the federal courts, respectively. These policy decisions range from the seemingly trivial, such as the size of holes in Swiss cheese, to matters of life-and-death importance, such as how to limit emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and mercury. These agencies also range in age, organization, and duties. There is the postal service, which was created over 200 years ago, and changed almost 50 years ago from a cabinet-level department to a government corporation. On the newer side, there is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which was established in 2011 to protect consumers in the financial arena and faces considerable scrutiny on constitutional and other grounds. In this quarter of Administrative Law, we will consider the creation and control of the modern administrative state. Topics will include the structure of administrative agencies and thei more »
Federal agencies make an astounding number of policy decisions, engaging in more lawmaking and adjudication than Congress and the federal courts, respectively. These policy decisions range from the seemingly trivial, such as the size of holes in Swiss cheese, to matters of life-and-death importance, such as how to limit emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and mercury. These agencies also range in age, organization, and duties. There is the postal service, which was created over 200 years ago, and changed almost 50 years ago from a cabinet-level department to a government corporation. On the newer side, there is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which was established in 2011 to protect consumers in the financial arena and faces considerable scrutiny on constitutional and other grounds. In this quarter of Administrative Law, we will consider the creation and control of the modern administrative state. Topics will include the structure of administrative agencies and their place in a governing scheme of separated but overlapping powers, delegation of authority to agencies, types and requirements of agency decisionmaking, availability and scope of judicial review of agency action (and inaction), and other forms of agency oversight. We will apply concepts through many recent examples. A variety of policy areas will be considered, including (among others) national security, financial regulation, health care, the environment, food and drugs, and telecommunications. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Exam. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. This course will be capped at 65 students, randomly selected.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

LAW 7010: Constitutional Law: The Fourteenth Amendment

This course examines various aspects of the Fourteenth Amendment, with special attention paid to equal protection and substantive due process. We will examine many contested constitutional questions, including, for example: How did gay and lesbian relationships go so quickly from being subject to criminal prohibition to being eligible for marriage? What justifies the Supreme Court's striking down a law mandating segregated schools, when it had upheld an analogous law half a century earlier? Must the law treat all individuals identically, or may and should it grant special protections to members of historically disadvantaged groups? To what sources might (and should) a judge look to give content to vague constitutional terms like "equal protection" and "due process"? How can we distinguish "law" from "politics" in this area? Readings will include judicial opinions and some scholarly commentary. Class discussion will be supplemented with group exercises of various sorts. Elements used in grading: Class participation and exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Banks, R. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints