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81 - 90 of 123 results for: LAW ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LAW 4048: Regulating Internet Speech Platforms

Internet platforms like Google and Facebook play an enormous role in our online speech and information environment today. This class will review the intermediary liability laws that shape platforms' decisions about online content, and examine how successfully those laws achieve their goals. Students will be encouraged to think pragmatically about the legal, operational, and product design choices platforms may make in response to particular laws, drawing on the instructor's experience handling such questions as Associate General Counsel at Google. Readings and discussions will focus primarily on current US law, with some attention to European laws and to proposed or pending legislation. Important themes of the class include Constitutional and human rights constraints on intermediary liability laws; legal limits (or lack thereof) on platforms' enforcement of privatized speech rules under their Community Guidelines or Terms of Service; global enforcement of national laws requiring platfo more »
Internet platforms like Google and Facebook play an enormous role in our online speech and information environment today. This class will review the intermediary liability laws that shape platforms' decisions about online content, and examine how successfully those laws achieve their goals. Students will be encouraged to think pragmatically about the legal, operational, and product design choices platforms may make in response to particular laws, drawing on the instructor's experience handling such questions as Associate General Counsel at Google. Readings and discussions will focus primarily on current US law, with some attention to European laws and to proposed or pending legislation. Important themes of the class include Constitutional and human rights constraints on intermediary liability laws; legal limits (or lack thereof) on platforms' enforcement of privatized speech rules under their Community Guidelines or Terms of Service; global enforcement of national laws requiring platforms to remove content; and connections between platform liability and other areas of law such as consumer protection or privacy. Students will be responsible for three written assignments. The longest will be a final paper of 15 pages. The other two will both be short responses to the week's reading. Up to three students, with consent of instructor, will have the option to write an independent research paper for 3 units. After the term begins, students (max 3) accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students will be graded based on Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, and a Final Paper. Admission to the class is based on lottery, but in admitting students from the waitlist the instructor may prioritize based on students' degree programs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Keller, D. (PI)

LAW 4049: Hack Lab

This course aims to give students a solid understanding of the most common types of attacks used in cybercrime and cyberwarfare. Taught by a long-time cybersecurity practitioner, a recovering cyberlaw litigator, and a group of hearty, motivated TAs, each session will begin with a lecture covering the basics of an area of technology and how that technology has been misused in the past. Students will then complete a lab section, with the guidance of the instructor and assistants, where they attack a known insecure system using techniques and tools seen in the field. Each week, there will be a second lecture on the legal and policy impacts of the technologies and techniques we cover. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a basic understanding of some of the most common offensive techniques in use today as well as a comprehensive overview of the most important aspects of cyberpolicy and law. No computer science background is required. All students must have access to a Wi more »
This course aims to give students a solid understanding of the most common types of attacks used in cybercrime and cyberwarfare. Taught by a long-time cybersecurity practitioner, a recovering cyberlaw litigator, and a group of hearty, motivated TAs, each session will begin with a lecture covering the basics of an area of technology and how that technology has been misused in the past. Students will then complete a lab section, with the guidance of the instructor and assistants, where they attack a known insecure system using techniques and tools seen in the field. Each week, there will be a second lecture on the legal and policy impacts of the technologies and techniques we cover. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a basic understanding of some of the most common offensive techniques in use today as well as a comprehensive overview of the most important aspects of cyberpolicy and law. No computer science background is required. All students must have access to a Windows, Mac OS X or Linux laptop. Students must enroll in the lecture as well as one Computer Lab (Lab meets 50 minutes once a week). Special Instructions: This class is limited to 120 students with 30 spots for SLS students. If more than 30 SLS students wish to enroll, instructor permission is required. Elements used in grading: Class participation, written assignments, take-home midterm, and a final exam. Cross-listed with International Policy ( INTLPOL 268). Law students see INTLPOL listing for Computer Lab section meeting times.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 5007: International Business Negotiation

This course is structured around a quarter-long, simulated negotiation exercise which provides an in-depth study of the structuring and negotiating of an international business transaction. This class will be taught in counterpart with a class at Berkeley Law School. Students in this class will represent a U.S. pharmaceutical company, and the students in the class at Berkeley will represent an African agricultural production company. The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by the pharmaceutical company that uses the cassava produced by the African agricultural production company. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, a licensing agreement or a long term supply contract. The negotiations between the two classes will take place through written exchanges and through real-time negotiation which will be conducted both in-person and via videoconferences. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity more »
This course is structured around a quarter-long, simulated negotiation exercise which provides an in-depth study of the structuring and negotiating of an international business transaction. This class will be taught in counterpart with a class at Berkeley Law School. Students in this class will represent a U.S. pharmaceutical company, and the students in the class at Berkeley will represent an African agricultural production company. The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by the pharmaceutical company that uses the cassava produced by the African agricultural production company. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, a licensing agreement or a long term supply contract. The negotiations between the two classes will take place through written exchanges and through real-time negotiation which will be conducted both in-person and via videoconferences. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity (i) to experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, (ii) to study the business and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation, (iii) to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, (iv) to learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, (v) to give students experience in drafting communications, and (vi) to provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice with an unfamiliar opposing party (here, the students at Berkeley). Students will also learn about the legal and business issues that may arise in joint ventures, supply agreements and licensing agreements. The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiations process. Students are expected to spend time outside of class, working in teams, to prepare the written exchanges, to prepare for the live negotiations, and to prepare for class discussions. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations; collective evaluation of the class's preparation for, and performance in, the negotiations; and the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact on the negotiations. In addition to the regular Monday class, classes will meet for the live negotiations on one Thursday evening (DLA Palo Alto Office, 2000 University Avenue) at 7:00 PM (10/17), and three Saturday mornings and one Sunday morning at 10:30 AM (10/5, 10/12, 10/26 and 11/10) in the San Francisco office of DLA Piper (555 Mission Street; close to Montgomery St. BART station). [The Sunday class is scheduled to accommodate the MPRE exam on Saturday, 11/9] Due to the Thursday, Saturday and Sunday classes, this class will conclude on November 11. Admission to this class is by consent of instructor. The maximum class size is 21, which will include students from GSB or other departments. Attention Waitlist Students: Students on the waitlist for the course will be admitted if spots are available on the basis of their position on the waitlist and degree of study; all waitlist students are encouraged to attend the first class and will be notified as spaces become available. Attention Non-Law Students: You must complete and submit both a consent form and a Non-Law Student Course Add Request Form to the Law School Registrar's Office (Room 100). See Stanford Non-Law Student Course Registration on the SLS Registrar's Office website. Prerequisites: A course in basic negotiations (e.g., Law 7821) or comparable prior experience is recommended. A primer on basic negotiations skills will be offered at a time TBD as an alternative for students who have not had a prior negotiations class or experience. Elements used in grading: Class participation, written assignments and final paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 5008: International Commercial Arbitration

This course provides a rigorous introduction to the law, theory and practice of international commercial arbitration. International commercial arbitration which has become the default means of settling international disputes and with clients increasingly involved in international business transactions and cross-border activity, is a rapidly growing practice area in law firms of every size. The practice is peripatetic, with many international arbitration lawyers basing themselves in law firms in New York, Washington D.C., Paris, Hong Kong, Singapore, and other major world commercial centers. The course will deal with the internationalist elements of the subject matter, but also examine international commercial arbitration from an American perspective. Students can expect to review both foreign and US commentaries, statutes and case law. The course will comprise of five main topics: (1) an introduction to the field of international commercial arbitration; (2) the agreement to arbitrate; (3) the arbitrators; (4) the arbitration process; and (5) the arbitral award. The intent is to provide a strong academic understanding of the various theories and principles, but with a strong practical bent. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Final Exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Tan, D. (PI)

LAW 5038: Jewish Law: Introduction and Topics

This course will provide an overview of the field of Jewish Law and will seek to provide a few case studies of topics in Jewish Law. All the readings are in English and this course presupposes no background in Jewish Law. Jewish Law is the world's oldest complex legal systems with distinct and idiosyncratic approaches to family, commercial, ritual and many other areas of law. It also has developed an elaborate "conflicts of law" sub-literature focusing on when should Jewish Law apply and when should some other legal system apply, reflecting the long history of the Jewish community in the diaspora as a minority. In this course, we will consider how Jewish law approaches a number of specific topics and we will ponder as well the proper interaction between Jewish law and secular legal norms, Jewish Law and changes in technology, Jewish law and sovereignty, Jewish Law and Bioethics and Jewish law and Family. Other topics will be added as we all see fit. Students who are interested in makin more »
This course will provide an overview of the field of Jewish Law and will seek to provide a few case studies of topics in Jewish Law. All the readings are in English and this course presupposes no background in Jewish Law. Jewish Law is the world's oldest complex legal systems with distinct and idiosyncratic approaches to family, commercial, ritual and many other areas of law. It also has developed an elaborate "conflicts of law" sub-literature focusing on when should Jewish Law apply and when should some other legal system apply, reflecting the long history of the Jewish community in the diaspora as a minority. In this course, we will consider how Jewish law approaches a number of specific topics and we will ponder as well the proper interaction between Jewish law and secular legal norms, Jewish Law and changes in technology, Jewish law and sovereignty, Jewish Law and Bioethics and Jewish law and Family. Other topics will be added as we all see fit. Students who are interested in making a presentation on an area of their choice are welcome to do so. The course will seek to include an optional supplementary "field trip" to see a rabbinical court in action in California. The Learning Outcomes provided by this court include the following: Students who take this course will: 1. Exhibit knowledge and understanding of key concepts in substantive law, procedural law, and legal thought in Jewish Law. 2. Demonstrate facility with legal analysis and reasoning in the Jewish Legal tradition and will demonstrate the ability to conduct legal research in Jewish Law. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer, with consent of the instructor, from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies ( JEWISHST 265).
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Broyde, M. (PI)

LAW 5040: Law, Lawyers, and Transformation in Democratic South Africa

Registration for this class took place in Spring 2019. Enrollment in the class is currently closed. South Africa's transition to democracy in 1994 marked the formal end of the comprehensive political, economic, and social system of racial subordination known as apartheid. The country has changed dramatically since then, as the government has built several million new housing units, created social welfare systems, and created an array of government and private sector programs to combat discrimination and redress the effects of subordination. Yet the country remains among the most unequal in the world, with 64% of black South Africans living below the poverty line, compared to 1% of whites. Most non-white South Africans receive poor education, live in substandard housing, and have limited employment opportunities. In the last five years, discontent with the pace of economic and social transformation has boiled over. In 2015, university campuses erupted in protests. Students' demands quic more »
Registration for this class took place in Spring 2019. Enrollment in the class is currently closed. South Africa's transition to democracy in 1994 marked the formal end of the comprehensive political, economic, and social system of racial subordination known as apartheid. The country has changed dramatically since then, as the government has built several million new housing units, created social welfare systems, and created an array of government and private sector programs to combat discrimination and redress the effects of subordination. Yet the country remains among the most unequal in the world, with 64% of black South Africans living below the poverty line, compared to 1% of whites. Most non-white South Africans receive poor education, live in substandard housing, and have limited employment opportunities. In the last five years, discontent with the pace of economic and social transformation has boiled over. In 2015, university campuses erupted in protests. Students' demands quickly expanded from the removal of statutes of white colonizers to wider "decolonization" of university faculty and curricula and the expansion of access to higher education. "Born-free" student activists are now calling for faster, more radical transformation not just of campuses but of the society as a whole; many denounce what they see as the Mandela generation's overly conciliatory approach to white privilege in the economy, society, and interpersonal relations. Since 2018 there is new dynamism at the top, too: many South Africans believe that their new President, Cyril Ramaphosa, will curtail corruption and expand redistributive economic and social policies. This course provides an opportunity to engage South Africa at this exciting historical moment, through intensive study during a week at Stanford and meetings with lawyers, activists, community members, and possibly students, journalists, and politicians during a week in Cape Town. We will focus on how lawyers are struggling for social justice and economic and social transformation--sometimes through ambitious arguments using South Africa's highly progressive constitution, but more often by supporting social movements day to day. Our learning will be grounded in specific cases, such as of the shackdwellers movement Abahlali baseMjondolo; Equal Education, an organization of high school-age students; and pioneering class actions on behalf of injured gold miners. These will enable us to explore various ways law and lawyers fit into social change, the challenges and rewards of such work, and how their perspectives overlap with and diverge from those of their clients. At the same time, we will draw connections between this work and the grand debates and historical arc described above. While comparing South Africa with the United States will not be a primary purpose of the course, we may well see interesting parallels and divergences, and will have some space to discuss those, among ourselves and perhaps with our South African interlocutors. The format of the course will be unusual: We will return to campus before the Fall quarter and spend the week of September 9 preparing intensively at Stanford. We will meet daily for approximately three hours of discussion, collaborative exercises, and some lecturing, as well as read assigned material outside class. We will (a) learn some essential background on apartheid; current legal, political, economic, and social conditions; and our case studies; (b) begin to analyze legal activism methods and the challenges of transformation; and (c) prepare topics and specific questions for our meetings in South Africa, which students will lead. The following weekend we will fly to Cape Town, where we will spend the week of September 16 learning from visits to organizations and communities, and possibly one or two museums or other sites, as well as from discussions with a range of South Africans. We will return the weekend before the Fall quarter begins. Stanford Law School is committed to equal access to field study courses regardless of financial situation. The School covers nearly all expenses during the trip, but students must pay for their own transportation to and from South Africa. Students who qualify for financial aid can receive a supplemental award to cover those transportation costs. Elements use in grading: The course grade will be based on a series of short papers (one or more of which may be due after our return), active in-class engagement with the assigned materials, and preparation for and participation in interviews during the trip, and. The course is open to rising 2Ls and 3Ls. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 5101: Afghanistan Legal Education Project (ALEP) Seminar

The Afghanistan Legal Education Project (ALEP) Seminar is only open to student preselected in spring 2019. The ALEP Seminar will begin with an intensive bootcamp taught by ALEP leadership and members of the law faculty at American University of Afghanistan (AUAF). We will explore the Afghan sociopolitical and legal context, rule of law efforts and challenges in Afghanistan, and the role of legal education in legal development. Participants will learn from Afghan law professors about Shari'a law, customary law, Afghan civil law, and the challenges presented by Afghanistan's pluralistic legal system in preparation to work on legal curriculum to be taught at AUAF. The bootcamp, held in Asia, will be highly participatory and requires full attendance. During the remainder of the quarter, participants will receive training in curriculum creation and organizational development in preparation for authoring an Afghan legal textbook and assuming ALEP programmatic responsibilities. Consent Proces more »
The Afghanistan Legal Education Project (ALEP) Seminar is only open to student preselected in spring 2019. The ALEP Seminar will begin with an intensive bootcamp taught by ALEP leadership and members of the law faculty at American University of Afghanistan (AUAF). We will explore the Afghan sociopolitical and legal context, rule of law efforts and challenges in Afghanistan, and the role of legal education in legal development. Participants will learn from Afghan law professors about Shari'a law, customary law, Afghan civil law, and the challenges presented by Afghanistan's pluralistic legal system in preparation to work on legal curriculum to be taught at AUAF. The bootcamp, held in Asia, will be highly participatory and requires full attendance. During the remainder of the quarter, participants will receive training in curriculum creation and organizational development in preparation for authoring an Afghan legal textbook and assuming ALEP programmatic responsibilities. Consent Process: Only students selected in spring 2019 have consent to take the ALEP Seminar. Their names will be given to the Registrar, who will automatically enroll them in the course in fall 2019. Elements used in grading: Grading is based on mandatory attendance of the bootcamp, participation, assignments, and authoring a new chapter and/or revision of an existing textbook chapter. Note: Regular deadline for submission of R-Paper to be waived for ALEP Seminar.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 5103: State-Building and the Rule of Law Seminar

The State-Building and the Rule of Law Seminar is centrally concerned with bridging theory and practice. The seminar introduces the key theories relevant to state-building generally, and strengthening the rule of law in particular. This course explores the multidisciplinary nature of development --- through readings, lectures, guest lectures, case studies, and seminar discussions --- and asks how lawyers fit in and contribute to the process? The set of developing countries considered within the scope of this workshop is broad. It includes, among others, states engaged in post-conflict reconstruction, e.g., Cambodia, Timor Leste, Rwanda, Iraq, Sierra Leone; states still in conflict, e.g., Afghanistan, Somalia; the poorest states of the world that may not fall neatly into the categories of conflict or post-conflict, e.g., Nepal, Haiti; least developed states that are not marked by high levels of violent conflict at all, e.g., Bhutan; and more developed states at critical stages of transi more »
The State-Building and the Rule of Law Seminar is centrally concerned with bridging theory and practice. The seminar introduces the key theories relevant to state-building generally, and strengthening the rule of law in particular. This course explores the multidisciplinary nature of development --- through readings, lectures, guest lectures, case studies, and seminar discussions --- and asks how lawyers fit in and contribute to the process? The set of developing countries considered within the scope of this workshop is broad. It includes, among others, states engaged in post-conflict reconstruction, e.g., Cambodia, Timor Leste, Rwanda, Iraq, Sierra Leone; states still in conflict, e.g., Afghanistan, Somalia; the poorest states of the world that may not fall neatly into the categories of conflict or post-conflict, e.g., Nepal, Haiti; least developed states that are not marked by high levels of violent conflict at all, e.g., Bhutan; and more developed states at critical stages of transition, e.g., Tunisia, Georgia, Hungary. Grading is based on participation, a presentation of research or a proposal, and, in consultation with the professor, a research paper. The research paper may be a group project (Section 01) graded MP/R/F or an individual in-depth research proposal either of which could be the basis for future field research (Section 02) graded H/P/R/F. Students approved for Section 01 or Section 02 may receive EL credit or R credit. Automatic grading penalty waived for submission of the final work products. CONSENT APPLICATION: The seminar is open by consent to up to sixteen (16) JD, SPILS, and LLM students, and graduate students from other departments within Stanford University. This course is taught in conjunction with the India Field Study component ( Law 5026). Students may enroll for this course alone or for both this course and Law 5026 with consent of the instructor (12 students will come to India). To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with International Policy ( INTLPOL 352).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 5201: Foreign Legal Study: Bucerius Law School

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-14
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

LAW 5204: Foreign Legal Study: Hebrew University of Jerusalem

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-14
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)
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