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71 - 80 of 123 results for: LAW ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LAW 2503: Energy Law

Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require major capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders deploy in legal and political fora to advance privat more »
Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require major capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders deploy in legal and political fora to advance private gain and public goods. Students who complete the class will gain a historical understanding of how economic regulation of the energy sector has evolved since the early 20th century, a durable conceptual framework for understanding modern energy law and policy debates, and a practical understanding of energy law designed for future practitioners. Non-law students interested in energy issues are highly encouraged to take this course, as energy law literacy is essential to careers in the sector. Elements used in grading: class participation, short written assignments, and a one-day take-home final exam. Cross-listed with Environment and Resources ( ENVRES 226).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 2519: Water Law

This course will study how society allocates and protects its most crucial natural resource -- water. The emphasis will be on current legal and policy debates, although we will also examine the history of water development and politics. Although the course will focus on United States law and policy, insights from the course are applicable to water regimes throughout the world, and we will occasionally look at law and policy elsewhere in the world for comparison. Among the many issues that we will consider are: how to allocate water during periods of scarcity (particularly as climate change leads to more extremes); alternative means of responding to the world's growing demands for water (including active conservation); the appropriate role for the market and private companies in meeting society's water needs; protection of threatened groundwater resources; environmental limits on water development (including the U.S. Endangered Species Act and the "public trust" doctrine); constitutiona more »
This course will study how society allocates and protects its most crucial natural resource -- water. The emphasis will be on current legal and policy debates, although we will also examine the history of water development and politics. Although the course will focus on United States law and policy, insights from the course are applicable to water regimes throughout the world, and we will occasionally look at law and policy elsewhere in the world for comparison. Among the many issues that we will consider are: how to allocate water during periods of scarcity (particularly as climate change leads to more extremes); alternative means of responding to the world's growing demands for water (including active conservation); the appropriate role for the market and private companies in meeting society's water needs; protection of threatened groundwater resources; environmental limits on water development (including the U.S. Endangered Species Act and the "public trust" doctrine); constitutional issues in water governance; Indian water rights; protection of water quality; challenges to substantively reforming existing water law; and interstate and international disputes over water. Students will be expected to participate actively in classroom discussions. Elements Used in Grading: Class participation, attendance and final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Thompson, B. (PI)

LAW 3005: Law and Biosciences Workshop

This workshop seminar will provide students with the opportunity to examine and critique cutting-edge research and work in the field of law and the biosciences presented by different speakers from Stanford and elsewhere. Although it is open to all students, the seminar is designed especially for those with an interest in the field who wish to stay abreast of current issues, work, and ideas. In each class, an academic expert, policy maker, or practitioner will present his or her current research or work and engage in a robust discussion. This class is worth one unit. It will meet five times for 1 hour, 50 minutes per session; students will need to attend at all five sessions and, for each session attended, write a reflection piece of roughly three double-spaced pages, due just before the speaker's presentation. The class is open to first-year Law School students in Winter Quarter. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, and written assignments.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Greely, H. (PI)

LAW 3502: Art and the Law

This course covers the legal, public policy, and ethical issues that concern artists, art dealers, auction houses, museums, collectors, and others who comprise the world of visual art. Our focus will be on artists' rights (including copyright, resale royalties, moral rights, and freedom of expression issues), how the markets in art function (such as the artist-dealer relationship, auction rules, and issues faced by collectors), and the legal and ethical rules governing the collection, donation, and display of visual art, particularly for museums and their donors. The course focuses on certain recurrent themes: How do statutes and courts define (or attempt to define) art, and how is art defined differently for different legal purposes? How does the special character of art justify or require different treatment under the law from that accorded other tangible personal property, and how does (and should) the expressive nature of art affect the way it is owned, protected, regulated, or fun more »
This course covers the legal, public policy, and ethical issues that concern artists, art dealers, auction houses, museums, collectors, and others who comprise the world of visual art. Our focus will be on artists' rights (including copyright, resale royalties, moral rights, and freedom of expression issues), how the markets in art function (such as the artist-dealer relationship, auction rules, and issues faced by collectors), and the legal and ethical rules governing the collection, donation, and display of visual art, particularly for museums and their donors. The course focuses on certain recurrent themes: How do statutes and courts define (or attempt to define) art, and how is art defined differently for different legal purposes? How does the special character of art justify or require different treatment under the law from that accorded other tangible personal property, and how does (and should) the expressive nature of art affect the way it is owned, protected, regulated, or funded? We anticipate having two or three visitors to the class during the quarter, such as a gallery owner, auctioneer, and museum director. In addition, we will also have the students participate in at least one or two interactive negotiation simulation exercises inspired by real situations and controversies in the art world. Graduate students from other departments and schools are welcome to take this course with the permission of the instructors. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

LAW 3505: Law and Culture in American Fiction

This seminar explores the interplay of legal and literary representations in nineteenth and twentieth century American culture. Each week, a novel or story is paired with relevant legal and historical readings. Central themes include the ways literary texts register changes in property law, the law of contracts, intellectual property and legal constructions of race, gender, and privacy, especially as they relate to the maintenance of personal identity, community stability, and linguistic meaning. The terms and stakes of these relationships inform our readings of both fiction and legal texts (often cases). The writers whose work we will consider include James Fenimore Cooper, Herman Melville, Henry James, Nella Larsen, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, and Sherman Alexie. We will also consider the points of contact between literary narrative and narrative in law. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and final paper. Automatic grading penalty waive more »
This seminar explores the interplay of legal and literary representations in nineteenth and twentieth century American culture. Each week, a novel or story is paired with relevant legal and historical readings. Central themes include the ways literary texts register changes in property law, the law of contracts, intellectual property and legal constructions of race, gender, and privacy, especially as they relate to the maintenance of personal identity, community stability, and linguistic meaning. The terms and stakes of these relationships inform our readings of both fiction and legal texts (often cases). The writers whose work we will consider include James Fenimore Cooper, Herman Melville, Henry James, Nella Larsen, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, and Sherman Alexie. We will also consider the points of contact between literary narrative and narrative in law. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and final paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Special instructions: Course requirements include class attendance and participation, three short response papers, and two longer papers. For Research "R" credit, students may petition to complete one long paper based on independent research. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 4005: Introduction to Intellectual Property

This is an overview course covering the basics of intellectual property law -- trade secrets, patents, copyrights, and trademarks, as well as selected other state intellectual property rights. This course is designed both for those who are interested in pursuing IP as a career, and those who are looking only for a basic knowledge of the subject. There are no prerequisites, and a scientific background is not required. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam (4-hour, open-book, in-class final).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

LAW 4007: Intellectual Property: Copyright

Copyright law is the engine that drives not only such traditional entertainment and information industries as music, book publishing, news and motion pictures, but also software, video games and other digital products. This course examines in depth all aspects of copyright law and practice, as well as the business and policy challenges and opportunities that the Internet and other new technologies present for the exploitation of copyrighted works. There are no prerequisites for this class. Elements used in grading: Final Exam (In-School, open book).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 4011: Intellectual Property: The Business & Law of Technology & Patent Licensing

If you practice in any technology-related area (whether transactions, corporate, or litigation), you will encounter licensing, as it is the principal means by which technology and patent rights are disseminated, exploited and commercialized. It is fundamental to Silicon Valley and beyond, including in software, mobile, consumer devices, autonomous cars, semiconductors and pharmaceuticals. This is a practice-oriented course covering the fundamentals of licensing technology and patents, including business considerations, drafting, negotiations and strategic considerations. We will also consider the role of licensing in mergers and acquisitions, litigation and antitrust contexts. The course is structured based on a real-world hypothetical involving entrepreneurs who spin out university-developed inventions into startup companies and then seek to commercialize the technology and patents to leading companies in a specified technology industry (such as smartphones, autonomous cars, "internet of things" or the like). We will also have a guest lecturer from a major technology company with significant licensing dimensions (which in the past have included Google, Waymo, and Qualcomm). Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 4012: Intellectual Property: Trademark and Unfair Competition Law

This course will consider the protection and enforcement of trademarks and related state rights in brands and names, including the right of publicity. There is no prerequisite, though some students will have taken Introduction to Intellectual Property. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Exam (Open-book one-day take-home).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Lemley, M. (PI)

LAW 4039: Regulating Artificial Intelligence

Even just a generation ago, interest in "artificial intelligence" (AI) was largely confined to academic computer science, philosophy, engineering research and development efforts, and science fiction. Today the term is widely understood to encompass not only long-term efforts to simulate the kind of general intelligence humans reflect, but also fast-evolving technologies (such as elaborate convolutional neural networks leveraging vast amounts of data) increasingly affecting finance, transportation, health care, national security, advertising and social media, and a variety of other fields. Conceived for students with interest in law, business, public policy, design, and ethics, this highly interactive course surveys current and emerging legal and policy problems related to how law structures humanity's relationship to artificially-constructed intelligence. To deepen students' understanding of current and medium-term problems in this area, the course explores definitions and foundationa more »
Even just a generation ago, interest in "artificial intelligence" (AI) was largely confined to academic computer science, philosophy, engineering research and development efforts, and science fiction. Today the term is widely understood to encompass not only long-term efforts to simulate the kind of general intelligence humans reflect, but also fast-evolving technologies (such as elaborate convolutional neural networks leveraging vast amounts of data) increasingly affecting finance, transportation, health care, national security, advertising and social media, and a variety of other fields. Conceived for students with interest in law, business, public policy, design, and ethics, this highly interactive course surveys current and emerging legal and policy problems related to how law structures humanity's relationship to artificially-constructed intelligence. To deepen students' understanding of current and medium-term problems in this area, the course explores definitions and foundational concepts associated with "artificial intelligence," likely directions for the evolution of AI, and different types of legally-relevant concerns raised by those developments and by the use of existing versions of AI. We will consider distinct settings where regulation of AI is emerging as a challenge or topic of interest, including autonomous vehicles, autonomous weapons, AI in social media/communications platforms, and systemic AI safety problems; doctrines and legal provisions relevant to the development, control, and deployment of AI such as the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation; the connection between the legal treatment of manufactured intelligence and related bodies of existing law, such as administrative law, torts, constitutional principles, criminal justice, and international law; and new legal arrangements that could affect the development and use of AI. We will also cover topics associated with the development and design of AI as they relate to the legal system, such as measuring algorithmic bias and explainability of AI models. Cross-cutting themes will include: how law affects the way important societal decisions are justified, the balance of power and responsibility between humans and machines in different settings, the incorporation of multiple values into AI decision making frameworks, the interplay of norms and formal law, the technical complexities that may arise as society scales deployment of AI systems, and similarities and differences to other domains of human activity raising regulatory trade-offs and affected by technological change. Note: The course is designed both for students who want a survey of the field and lack any technical knowledge, as well as for students who want to gain tools and ideas to deepen their existing interest or background in the topic. Students with longer-term interest in or experience with the subject are welcome to do a more technically-oriented paper or project in connection with this class. But technical knowledge or familiarity with AI is not a prerequisite, as various optional readings and some in-class material will help provide necessary background. Requirements: The course involves a mix of lectures, in-class activities, and student-led discussion and presentations. Requirements include attendance, participation in planning and conducting at least one student-led group presentation or discussion, two short 3-5 pp. response papers for other class sessions, and either an exam or a 25-30 pp. research paper. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer, with consent of the instructor, from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. CONSENT APPLICATION: We will try to accommodate as many people as possible with interest in the course. But to facilitate planning and confirm your level of interest, please fill out an application (available at https://bit.ly/2MJIem9) by September 4, 2019. Applications received after September 4, 2019 will be considered on a rolling basis if space is available. The application is also available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Cuellar, M. (PI)
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