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61 - 70 of 124 results for: LAW

LAW 922: Advanced Youth and Education Advocacy Clinic

The Youth and Education Advocacy Advanced Clinic provides an opportunity for students who have already successfully completed the Education Advocacy Clinic to continue their advocacy work in the Clinic and/or to pursue a discrete project related to educational equity advocacy. Examples of projects include strategic policy research and management consulting for public education institutions on specific topics (e.g., accountability programs, community outreach and engagement, school climate); investigation and preparation for impact litigation; and community education and outreach on a specific education-related issue. All projects will be jointly designed by the instructor and the advanced student. Advanced students will also continue to participate in the Clinic's discussion of cases during case rounds. Special instructions: Admission is by consent of instructor. Advanced students may arrange with the instructor to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 overall clinical units, however, during the course of the student's law school career. Elements used in grading: Projects and class participation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 1009: Corporate Finance I

The course discusses many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers and investors. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relations between risk and return, capital structure choice, payout policy, the effective use and valuation of derivative securities, risk management and executive compensation. Essential in many of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Our goal is to understand general principles and then apply them in practically important scenarios. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Midterm, Final Exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Bulow, J. (PI)

LAW 1013: Corporations

This course is an introduction to the basic legal rules and principles governing corporations and is the foundation for advanced business courses. We focus on the conflicts that arise between managers, investors, and creditors and we examine how law, markets, and contracts can reduce these conflicts and thereby improve firm value. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments, midterm, final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Daines, R. (PI)

LAW 1018: Derivatives

The course will examine the legal, regulatory, trading and risk management aspects of the $600 trillion notional over-the-counter and cleared derivatives markets. Derivatives have historically not been well-understood by regulators or the public and have been blamed for causing or contributing to the economic crisis. This course will offer students the opportunity to understand how various derivative products are designed, traded and risk-managed and what role regulators play in the derivatives industry. In addition, students will focus on understanding key legal contracts that underpin the global derivatives industry, in particular focusing on the ISDA© Master Agreement and Credit Support Annex, as well as documentation supporting credit derivatives and other common derivative types. Students will also consider the shifting regulatory landscape for financial institutions and hedge funds as it relates to the way in which these products are traded, with rates and credit products migrati more »
The course will examine the legal, regulatory, trading and risk management aspects of the $600 trillion notional over-the-counter and cleared derivatives markets. Derivatives have historically not been well-understood by regulators or the public and have been blamed for causing or contributing to the economic crisis. This course will offer students the opportunity to understand how various derivative products are designed, traded and risk-managed and what role regulators play in the derivatives industry. In addition, students will focus on understanding key legal contracts that underpin the global derivatives industry, in particular focusing on the ISDA© Master Agreement and Credit Support Annex, as well as documentation supporting credit derivatives and other common derivative types. Students will also consider the shifting regulatory landscape for financial institutions and hedge funds as it relates to the way in which these products are traded, with rates and credit products migrating to clearinghouses. The course will conclude with an examination of the economic crisis that erupted with Lehman Brothers' bankruptcy in September 2008 and the consequent policy reactions to that event from a derivatives and bankruptcy perspective. Elements used in grading: attendance, written homework assignments and a final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Summe, K. (PI)

LAW 1029: Taxation I

This course provides an overview of the federal income tax. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Bankman, J. (PI)

LAW 1033: Trusts and Estates

This course will cover the following topics: intestacy; will execution and revocation; will provisions and interpretations; restrictions on the right to devise; probate; creation, amendment and termination of trusts; revocable and irrevocable trusts; trust provisions; charitable trusts; trust administration; and durable powers of attorneys, advanced health care directives and conservatorships. Elements used in grading: Final exam (In-School: open book, essay).
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Pearson, B. (PI)

LAW 1034: Real Estate Transactions

Real Estate Transactions and Commercial Development examines the structuring, negotiation and documentation of commercial real estate transactions. Working both individually and in groups, students will learn the requisite skills for drafting and negotiating leases, letters of intent, sale contracts and related financing documents. As time permits, development-related matters will be explored, including the legal aspects of site acquisition, design and construction. Classes will be a mixture of lectures, interactive discussions, and several mock negotiations. Elements used in grading: Class attendance, individual and group project participation, and written assignments. No final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Kleiman, D. (PI)

LAW 1047: Business, Social Responsibility, and Human Rights

Large corporations now routinely spend millions of dollars to protect human rights and the environment. Shell Nigeria builds hospitals and schools in the Niger Delta. Nike employs hundreds of inspectors to improve conditions for the factory workers who produce its shoes across Asia and Latin America. Technology companies such as Facebook have scrambled to fend off the threat of new regulation since the Cambridge Analytica revelations. Other examples abound, across industries and around the globe. "Don't be evil" (Google's former motto) may be one motivation for these companies, but something more mundane is also at work: many companies believe they will do well, financially, if they do good, ethically. This course examines questions that lawyers in large law firms, corporations, NGOs, and government agencies regularly confront: --What does it mean for a company to "do good"? Should it care? --When does it serve a company's interest to take costly action to address human rights, labor, more »
Large corporations now routinely spend millions of dollars to protect human rights and the environment. Shell Nigeria builds hospitals and schools in the Niger Delta. Nike employs hundreds of inspectors to improve conditions for the factory workers who produce its shoes across Asia and Latin America. Technology companies such as Facebook have scrambled to fend off the threat of new regulation since the Cambridge Analytica revelations. Other examples abound, across industries and around the globe. "Don't be evil" (Google's former motto) may be one motivation for these companies, but something more mundane is also at work: many companies believe they will do well, financially, if they do good, ethically. This course examines questions that lawyers in large law firms, corporations, NGOs, and government agencies regularly confront: --What does it mean for a company to "do good"? Should it care? --When does it serve a company's interest to take costly action to address human rights, labor, and environmental concerns? --What tactics have activists used to shift public opinion, media frames, and the law, and thereby change companies' incentives? We will learn through seminar-style discussion, lectures, role play, and small group exercises. Several guest speakers with experience in business, advocacy, or in between will provide insights from their experiences on the ground. Special Instructions: Students have the option to write a long research paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students enrolled in the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Written Assignments; Final Exam or Final Paper. Cross-listed with International Policy ( INTLPOL 358).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 2002: Criminal Procedure: Investigation

The law school offers two survey courses dealing with constitutional criminal procedure. "Criminal Adjudication" covers the formal pretrial and trial processes, including the right of counsel, prosecutorial charging criteria, grand juries, bail, speedy trial, discovery, plea bargaining, trial by jury, and double jeopardy. This course, "Criminal Investigation," covers police investigation in the form of searches and seizures, interrogations, lineups, and undercover operations, and hence examines the Fourth and Fifth (and, to a limited extent, the Sixth) Amendment rules regulating the police in these endeavors. It also incorporates some of the federal laws governing electronic communications and privacy. Students may take both Criminal Investigation and Criminal Adjudication. (There is, of course, no requirement to do so.) Elements used in grading: Final exam (in-class, open book), plus small adjustments for exceptional class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Weisberg, R. (PI)

LAW 2008: Three Strikes Project: Criminal Justice Reform & Individual Representation

This seminar offers an opportunity to study mass incarceration, criminal justice reform, and post-conviction litigation in real time. In many ways, the era of mass incarceration began in California with the enactment of the "Three Strikes and You're Out" sentencing law in 1994. Today, California leads political and policy trends in the opposite direction with a number of critical reforms to the state's justice system. In this seminar students read and analyze a variety of cases and articles, examining the evolution of incarceration and sentencing policies in California and across the country. Students also assist with live litigation on behalf of inmates sentenced to life in prison for nonviolent crimes. Students also have the opportunity to contribute to ongoing research, public policy analysis and advocacy in the area of criminal justice reform. The class focuses largely on California's Three Strikes law as a case study in the history, politics, constitutional doctrine, and reform of more »
This seminar offers an opportunity to study mass incarceration, criminal justice reform, and post-conviction litigation in real time. In many ways, the era of mass incarceration began in California with the enactment of the "Three Strikes and You're Out" sentencing law in 1994. Today, California leads political and policy trends in the opposite direction with a number of critical reforms to the state's justice system. In this seminar students read and analyze a variety of cases and articles, examining the evolution of incarceration and sentencing policies in California and across the country. Students also assist with live litigation on behalf of inmates sentenced to life in prison for nonviolent crimes. Students also have the opportunity to contribute to ongoing research, public policy analysis and advocacy in the area of criminal justice reform. The class focuses largely on California's Three Strikes law as a case study in the history, politics, constitutional doctrine, and reform of criminal justice policy throughout the country. Students will test their skills in the field by assisting with the representation of individual inmates sentenced to long prison terms for nonviolent crimes in state and federal courts. The Project has been intimately involved in the movement to reduce incarceration in California and throughout the country, partnering with the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and Obama administration on different projects including direct legislative reform, impact litigation, executive clemency, and prisoner reentry. Students enrolled in the seminar quickly become involved in all aspects of the Project's work, including assistance with different stages of ongoing litigation. Students will visit a Project client in prison, conduct factual investigations, and draft petitions on our clients' behalf. The Project is an active, fast-paced organization that depends on the hard work and contributions of law students enrolled in this seminar. This seminar offers the opportunity to both study the theory behind the law and to hone practical litigation and advocacy skills in and out of the courtroom. The seminar will meet for 3 hours per week, including 1 hour individual meetings with Project director Mike Romano. CONSENT APPLICATION: Interested students must apply to enroll in the seminar by sending a one-page statement of interest and resume by email with the subject line "application" to Mike Romano (mromano@stanford.edu). Applications will be considered on a rolling basis. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Romano, M. (PI)
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