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41 - 50 of 124 results for: LAW ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LAW 908C: Environmental Law Clinic: Clinical Coursework

Students enrolled in the Clinic provide legal assistance to national, regional and grassroots non-profit organizations on a variety of environmental issues, with a focus on complex natural resource conservation and biodiversity matters at the interface of law, science and policy. Working under the direct supervision of practicing environmental attorneys, Clinic students help screen new matters and potential clients; formulate strategies; research and develop factual and legal issues; and prosecute administrative and litigation proceedings. During the term, students may meet with clients, opposing counsel or agency decision-makers; review and prepare administrative records; develop expert testimony; draft comment letters, petitions, pleading or briefs; and/or attend and present arguments in administrative and court hearings. In regular one-on-one meetings with supervising faculty, there is a heavy emphasis on learning how to write persuasively and present oral arguments. Indeed, in any more »
Students enrolled in the Clinic provide legal assistance to national, regional and grassroots non-profit organizations on a variety of environmental issues, with a focus on complex natural resource conservation and biodiversity matters at the interface of law, science and policy. Working under the direct supervision of practicing environmental attorneys, Clinic students help screen new matters and potential clients; formulate strategies; research and develop factual and legal issues; and prosecute administrative and litigation proceedings. During the term, students may meet with clients, opposing counsel or agency decision-makers; review and prepare administrative records; develop expert testimony; draft comment letters, petitions, pleading or briefs; and/or attend and present arguments in administrative and court hearings. In regular one-on-one meetings with supervising faculty, there is a heavy emphasis on learning how to write persuasively and present oral arguments. Indeed, in any given quarter, our students typically prepare a mix of state and federal, and trial and appellate, court pleadings, and because all of our hearings during the academic year are conducted by students, many students also have the opportunity to present oral argument in front of one or more judges. In addition, students participate in a regular seminar where we examine strategic, ethical and substantive issues arising out of the Clinic's work. The Clinic is a particularly good place to learn how to conduct effective legal research, marshal facts in support of legal arguments, and, above all, write well. We practice at all levels of state and federal court and before many local, state and federal administrative agencies. Our work involves extensive motions practice and brief writing, and often involves administrative petitions and policy papers. Our work is inherently cross-disciplinary. No prior environmental experience or background is necessary, but an interest in learning about environmental and natural resources law is important. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four credits. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical credits during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Attendance and participation in class, professionalism, timeliness, initiative, and follow-through on project work and other class requirements.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4

LAW 910: Advanced Immigrants' Rights Clinic

The Immigrants' Rights Advanced Clinic offers the opportunity for students who have already successfully completed the Immigrants' Rights Clinic to pursue: a specific immigrants' rights advocacy project; advanced individual client representation; and/or working with the clinic director to provide direction/guidance to those enrolled in the Clinic for the first time. All advanced Clinic projects will be jointly designed by the director and the advanced student. Advanced students providing guidance/direction to first-time students will receive additional training on providing supervision. Special instructions: Advanced students are expected to attend the case-rounds portion of the weekly seminar, and to participate as needed in the lecture/discussion portion of the seminar. Advanced students may arrange with the instructor to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 overall clinical units, however, during the course of the student's law school career. Elements used in grading: Attendance and participation in class, project work, writing assignments, and case preparation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 912: Advanced International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic

The International Human Rights & Conflict Resolution Advanced Clinic offers the opportunity for students who have already successfully completed Clinic quarter to pursue one or more specific projects in conjunction with the Clinic, either independently or in collaboration with colleague(s) enrolled in the regular clinic. Any travel will be strictly contingent on the Advanced Clinical student's availability and the needs of the project. Advanced Clinical students are expected to participate in as much of the regular clinical seminar and seminar simulations as possible given pre-existing scheduling constraints and previous experience. Advanced students may arrange with the instructor to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 overall clinical units, however, during the course of the student's law school career. Elements used in grading: Project work, writing assignments, case preparation, attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 912A: International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic: Clinical Practice

In the past half-century, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discourse and practice. This Clinic gives students the opportunity to work directly with the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as they navigate the vast challenges faced by human rights advocates and victims. In addition to operating within the human rights framework, students will also have occasion to study and contribute to efforts to resolve situations of tension and ongoing conflict using tools of transitional justice and conflict mitigation. The course aims to help students develop a broad range of multidisciplinary human rights advocacy skills--including factual documentation; litigation before national, regional, and international institutions; community empowerment strategies; and client enfranchisement and representation--through in-class sessions, role play exercises, and engagement in, and critical assessment of, clinical proj more »
In the past half-century, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discourse and practice. This Clinic gives students the opportunity to work directly with the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as they navigate the vast challenges faced by human rights advocates and victims. In addition to operating within the human rights framework, students will also have occasion to study and contribute to efforts to resolve situations of tension and ongoing conflict using tools of transitional justice and conflict mitigation. The course aims to help students develop a broad range of multidisciplinary human rights advocacy skills--including factual documentation; litigation before national, regional, and international institutions; community empowerment strategies; and client enfranchisement and representation--through in-class sessions, role play exercises, and engagement in, and critical assessment of, clinical projects in human rights. This Clinic involves both a weekly seminar as well as work directly with clients and partner organizations (i.e. Clinic Projects). Together, these experiences give students the chance to reflect upon a number of foundational questions including: What are the origins of the human rights movement and where is it headed? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in rights promotion and defense? How is conflict resolution consistent with human rights advocacy? When and where are these approaches in tension? Students will also be confronted with the ethical and strategic issues that arise in the course of doing human rights work and balancing the often differing agendas of western international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and their counterparts in the (frequently non-western) developing world. In some sessions, part of the class will be devoted to presentations by students and clinical rounds in line with greater Mills Legal Clinic model. These presentations will consider one or more issues that arise in the course of students' own engagement in advocacy projects through the Clinic. During the course of the quarter, in addition to their work for their clients and partners, students will also be required to write several short, critical reflection papers or thought pieces (2-4 pages, double-spaced, or 500-1,000 words) on the readings, their Clinic Project(s), and/or human rights events on campus. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses. The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. As a general rule, students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work/projects (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical work product (i.e., the students' substantive contributions); clinical methods (which includes consideration of the students' lawyering skills, leadership, and professionalism); and clinical coursework (which focuses on the students' seminar participation, simulations, and reflection papers). Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Elements used in grading include: Attendance, class participation, written assignments, professionalism, ability to work with others successfully, creative thinking, peer review, and commitment to the clinical enterprise. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and the clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

LAW 912B: International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic: Clinical Methods

In the past half-century, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discourse and practice. This Clinic gives students the opportunity to work directly with the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as they navigate the vast challenges faced by human rights advocates and victims. In addition to operating within the human rights framework, students will also have occasion to study and contribute to efforts to resolve situations of tension and ongoing conflict using tools of transitional justice and conflict mitigation. The course aims to help students develop a broad range of multidisciplinary human rights advocacy skills--including factual documentation; litigation before national, regional, and international institutions; community empowerment strategies; and client enfranchisement and representation--through in-class sessions, role play exercises, and engagement in, and critical assessment of, clinical proj more »
In the past half-century, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discourse and practice. This Clinic gives students the opportunity to work directly with the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as they navigate the vast challenges faced by human rights advocates and victims. In addition to operating within the human rights framework, students will also have occasion to study and contribute to efforts to resolve situations of tension and ongoing conflict using tools of transitional justice and conflict mitigation. The course aims to help students develop a broad range of multidisciplinary human rights advocacy skills--including factual documentation; litigation before national, regional, and international institutions; community empowerment strategies; and client enfranchisement and representation--through in-class sessions, role play exercises, and engagement in, and critical assessment of, clinical projects in human rights. This Clinic involves both a weekly seminar as well as work directly with clients and partner organizations (i.e. Clinic Projects). Together, these experiences give students the chance to reflect upon a number of foundational questions including: What are the origins of the human rights movement and where is it headed? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in rights promotion and defense? How is conflict resolution consistent with human rights advocacy? When and where are these approaches in tension? Students will also be confronted with the ethical and strategic issues that arise in the course of doing human rights work and balancing the often differing agendas of western international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and their counterparts in the (frequently non-western) developing world. In some sessions, part of the class will be devoted to presentations by students and clinical rounds in line with greater Mills Legal Clinic model. These presentations will consider one or more issues that arise in the course of students' own engagement in advocacy projects through the Clinic. During the course of the quarter, in addition to their work for their clients and partners, students will also be required to write several short, critical reflection papers or thought pieces (2-4 pages, double-spaced, or 500-1,000 words) on the readings, their Clinic Project(s), and/or human rights events on campus. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses. The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. As a general rule, students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work/projects (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical work product (i.e., the students' substantive contributions); clinical methods (which includes consideration of the students' lawyering skills, leadership, and professionalism); and clinical coursework (which focuses on the students' seminar participation, simulations, and reflection papers). Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Elements used in grading include: Attendance, class participation, written assignments, professionalism, ability to work with others successfully, creative thinking, peer review, and commitment to the clinical enterprise. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and the clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

LAW 912C: International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic: Clinical Coursework

In the past half-century, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discourse and practice. This Clinic gives students the opportunity to work directly with the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as they navigate the vast challenges faced by human rights advocates and victims. In addition to operating within the human rights framework, students will also have occasion to study and contribute to efforts to resolve situations of tension and ongoing conflict using tools of transitional justice and conflict mitigation. The course aims to help students develop a broad range of multidisciplinary human rights advocacy skills--including factual documentation; litigation before national, regional, and international institutions; community empowerment strategies; and client enfranchisement and representation--through in-class sessions, role play exercises, and engagement in, and critical assessment of, clinical proj more »
In the past half-century, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discourse and practice. This Clinic gives students the opportunity to work directly with the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as they navigate the vast challenges faced by human rights advocates and victims. In addition to operating within the human rights framework, students will also have occasion to study and contribute to efforts to resolve situations of tension and ongoing conflict using tools of transitional justice and conflict mitigation. The course aims to help students develop a broad range of multidisciplinary human rights advocacy skills--including factual documentation; litigation before national, regional, and international institutions; community empowerment strategies; and client enfranchisement and representation--through in-class sessions, role play exercises, and engagement in, and critical assessment of, clinical projects in human rights. This Clinic involves both a weekly seminar as well as work directly with clients and partner organizations (i.e. Clinic Projects). Together, these experiences give students the chance to reflect upon a number of foundational questions including: What are the origins of the human rights movement and where is it headed? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in rights promotion and defense? How is conflict resolution consistent with human rights advocacy? When and where are these approaches in tension? Students will also be confronted with the ethical and strategic issues that arise in the course of doing human rights work and balancing the often differing agendas of western international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and their counterparts in the (frequently non-western) developing world. In some sessions, part of the class will be devoted to presentations by students and clinical rounds in line with greater Mills Legal Clinic model. These presentations will consider one or more issues that arise in the course of students' own engagement in advocacy projects through the Clinic. During the course of the quarter, in addition to their work for their clients and partners, students will also be required to write several short, critical reflection papers or thought pieces (2-4 pages, double-spaced, or 500-1,000 words) on the readings, their Clinic Project(s), and/or human rights events on campus. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses. The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. As a general rule, students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work/projects (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical work product (i.e., the students' substantive contributions); clinical methods (which includes consideration of the students' lawyering skills, leadership, and professionalism); and clinical coursework (which focuses on the students' seminar participation, simulations, and reflection papers). Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Elements used in grading include: Attendance, class participation, written assignments, professionalism, ability to work with others successfully, creative thinking, peer review, and commitment to the clinical enterprise. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and the clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

LAW 914: Advanced Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic

Advanced clinic allows students who have taken the Advanced Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic to continue working on cases. Advanced clinic may be taken for 2-7 units. Students may not enroll in any clinic (basic or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. Elements used in grading: TBA.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Malone, P. (PI)

LAW 914A: Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic: Clinical Practice

The Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic provides students the opportunity to understand and advocate for sound innovation policies. Students in the clinic will help shape the course and outcome of significant legal and policy debates before courts, legislators, regulatory bodies, and other policy makers. Our work focuses on the relationship between law, regulation and innovation in areas ranging from biotechnology to information technology, pharmaceuticals, clean technology, and the creation and distribution of information. Students will represent a variety of NGOs and non-profit entities and, in certain cases, groups or associations of innovators, entrepreneurs, technology users or consumers, economists, technologists, legal academics, and the like, and occasionally individual inventors, start-ups, journalists, or researchers. Students will address their client's complex issues through tools that may include amicus briefs; comments or testimony in rulemaking and reg more »
The Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic provides students the opportunity to understand and advocate for sound innovation policies. Students in the clinic will help shape the course and outcome of significant legal and policy debates before courts, legislators, regulatory bodies, and other policy makers. Our work focuses on the relationship between law, regulation and innovation in areas ranging from biotechnology to information technology, pharmaceuticals, clean technology, and the creation and distribution of information. Students will represent a variety of NGOs and non-profit entities and, in certain cases, groups or associations of innovators, entrepreneurs, technology users or consumers, economists, technologists, legal academics, and the like, and occasionally individual inventors, start-ups, journalists, or researchers. Students will address their client's complex issues through tools that may include amicus briefs; comments or testimony in rulemaking and regulatory proceedings (i.e., DMCA exemption requests, comments to OSTP on issues such as open access, privacy or open data, comments to the FTC as part of IP and innovation hearings and reports, comments to the PTO or FDA, etc.); comments or testimony on proposed legislation; and whitepapers or other "best practices" documents to encourage sensible and balanced legal approaches to innovation and creativity. Our policy advocacy will often involve intertwined factual, technological, business, economic, political and public relations considerations along with the substantive legal issues. Students in the clinic may be called upon to collaborate with technologists, researchers, doctors, economists, social scientists, industry experts, and others to develop and articulate the appropriate policy advocacy for their clients. The clinic seminar will focus on student-led workshops regarding client projects, and on engaging with current thinking around innovation, innovation economics and the impact of IP, antitrust, and other law and regulation on innovation. We will explore the process of policy advocacy, including various policy levers, the types of tools available to advocates and the strategies and tactics that may be employed, and will consider and critique a variety of case studies of previous advocacy, situating them in the larger context in which these efforts occurred. Students will critically examine the role of lawyers advocating for the public interest and for sound and sensible innovation policy outcomes and bring those lessons to bear on their own clinic work. A background in technology may be useful in some cases but is not necessary to a successful experience in the clinic. - - Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Attendance, preparation for and participation in clinic seminar; reflection papers; and clinical case and project work including specific elements of methodical analysis, critical thinking, close reading, efficient writing, effective collaboration, and strategy development, applicable across client and seminar work.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Malone, P. (PI)

LAW 914B: Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic: Clinical Methods

The Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic provides students the opportunity to understand and advocate for sound innovation policies. Students in the clinic will help shape the course and outcome of significant legal and policy debates before courts, legislators, regulatory bodies, and other policy makers. Our work focuses on the relationship between law, regulation and innovation in areas ranging from biotechnology to information technology, pharmaceuticals, clean technology, and the creation and distribution of information. Students will represent a variety of NGOs and non-profit entities and, in certain cases, groups or associations of innovators, entrepreneurs, technology users or consumers, economists, technologists, legal academics, and the like, and occasionally individual inventors, start-ups, journalists, or researchers. Students will address their client's complex issues through tools that may include amicus briefs; comments or testimony in rulemaking and reg more »
The Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic provides students the opportunity to understand and advocate for sound innovation policies. Students in the clinic will help shape the course and outcome of significant legal and policy debates before courts, legislators, regulatory bodies, and other policy makers. Our work focuses on the relationship between law, regulation and innovation in areas ranging from biotechnology to information technology, pharmaceuticals, clean technology, and the creation and distribution of information. Students will represent a variety of NGOs and non-profit entities and, in certain cases, groups or associations of innovators, entrepreneurs, technology users or consumers, economists, technologists, legal academics, and the like, and occasionally individual inventors, start-ups, journalists, or researchers. Students will address their client's complex issues through tools that may include amicus briefs; comments or testimony in rulemaking and regulatory proceedings (i.e., DMCA exemption requests, comments to OSTP on issues such as open access, privacy or open data, comments to the FTC as part of IP and innovation hearings and reports, comments to the PTO or FDA, etc.); comments or testimony on proposed legislation; and whitepapers or other "best practices" documents to encourage sensible and balanced legal approaches to innovation and creativity. Our policy advocacy will often involve intertwined factual, technological, business, economic, political and public relations considerations along with the substantive legal issues. Students in the clinic may be called upon to collaborate with technologists, researchers, doctors, economists, social scientists, industry experts, and others to develop and articulate the appropriate policy advocacy for their clients. The clinic seminar will focus on student-led workshops regarding client projects, and on engaging with current thinking around innovation, innovation economics and the impact of IP, antitrust, and other law and regulation on innovation. We will explore the process of policy advocacy, including various policy levers, the types of tools available to advocates and the strategies and tactics that may be employed, and will consider and critique a variety of case studies of previous advocacy, situating them in the larger context in which these efforts occurred. Students will critically examine the role of lawyers advocating for the public interest and for sound and sensible innovation policy outcomes and bring those lessons to bear on their own clinic work. A background in technology may be useful in some cases but is not necessary to a successful experience in the clinic. - - Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Attendance, preparation for and participation in clinic seminar; reflection papers; and clinical case and project work including specific elements of methodical analysis, critical thinking, close reading, efficient writing, effective collaboration, and strategy development, applicable across client and seminar work.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Malone, P. (PI)

LAW 914C: Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic: Clinical Coursework

The Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic provides students the opportunity to understand and advocate for sound innovation policies. Students in the clinic will help shape the course and outcome of significant legal and policy debates before courts, legislators, regulatory bodies, and other policy makers. Our work focuses on the relationship between law, regulation and innovation in areas ranging from biotechnology to information technology, pharmaceuticals, clean technology, and the creation and distribution of information. Students will represent a variety of NGOs and non-profit entities and, in certain cases, groups or associations of innovators, entrepreneurs, technology users or consumers, economists, technologists, legal academics, and the like, and occasionally individual inventors, start-ups, journalists, or researchers. Students will address their client's complex issues through tools that may include amicus briefs; comments or testimony in rulemaking and reg more »
The Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic provides students the opportunity to understand and advocate for sound innovation policies. Students in the clinic will help shape the course and outcome of significant legal and policy debates before courts, legislators, regulatory bodies, and other policy makers. Our work focuses on the relationship between law, regulation and innovation in areas ranging from biotechnology to information technology, pharmaceuticals, clean technology, and the creation and distribution of information. Students will represent a variety of NGOs and non-profit entities and, in certain cases, groups or associations of innovators, entrepreneurs, technology users or consumers, economists, technologists, legal academics, and the like, and occasionally individual inventors, start-ups, journalists, or researchers. Students will address their client's complex issues through tools that may include amicus briefs; comments or testimony in rulemaking and regulatory proceedings (i.e., DMCA exemption requests, comments to OSTP on issues such as open access, privacy or open data, comments to the FTC as part of IP and innovation hearings and reports, comments to the PTO or FDA, etc.); comments or testimony on proposed legislation; and whitepapers or other "best practices" documents to encourage sensible and balanced legal approaches to innovation and creativity. Our policy advocacy will often involve intertwined factual, technological, business, economic, political and public relations considerations along with the substantive legal issues. Students in the clinic may be called upon to collaborate with technologists, researchers, doctors, economists, social scientists, industry experts, and others to develop and articulate the appropriate policy advocacy for their clients. The clinic seminar will focus on student-led workshops regarding client projects, and on engaging with current thinking around innovation, innovation economics and the impact of IP, antitrust, and other law and regulation on innovation. We will explore the process of policy advocacy, including various policy levers, the types of tools available to advocates and the strategies and tactics that may be employed, and will consider and critique a variety of case studies of previous advocacy, situating them in the larger context in which these efforts occurred. Students will critically examine the role of lawyers advocating for the public interest and for sound and sensible innovation policy outcomes and bring those lessons to bear on their own clinic work. A background in technology may be useful in some cases but is not necessary to a successful experience in the clinic. - - Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Attendance, preparation for and participation in clinic seminar; reflection papers; and clinical case and project work including specific elements of methodical analysis, critical thinking, close reading, efficient writing, effective collaboration, and strategy development, applicable across client and seminar work.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Malone, P. (PI)
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