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111 - 120 of 124 results for: LAW ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LAW 7820: Moot Court

The major moot court activity at Stanford Law School is the Marion Rice Kirkwood Memorial Competition, which takes place each year during Autumn and Winter terms. Autumn term will be dedicated to brief writing and completion of the written portion of the Competition; the oral argument portion of the Competition will be conducted during the first four to five weeks of Winter term. Students on externship and in clinics may enroll, if permitted by their respective programs. In Autumn term there are only a few class meetings, including a guest lecture on ethics, which can be recorded. In addition, there are individually scheduled conferences. In Winter term, there are optional class meetings and practice arguments. Participation in the oral argument competition is mandatory, which includes attendance at the semifinal and final arguments. The preliminary rounds are held in the evening; the semifinal and final rounds are in the late afternoon. Prior to the Competition itself, materials and l more »
The major moot court activity at Stanford Law School is the Marion Rice Kirkwood Memorial Competition, which takes place each year during Autumn and Winter terms. Autumn term will be dedicated to brief writing and completion of the written portion of the Competition; the oral argument portion of the Competition will be conducted during the first four to five weeks of Winter term. Students on externship and in clinics may enroll, if permitted by their respective programs. In Autumn term there are only a few class meetings, including a guest lecture on ethics, which can be recorded. In addition, there are individually scheduled conferences. In Winter term, there are optional class meetings and practice arguments. Participation in the oral argument competition is mandatory, which includes attendance at the semifinal and final arguments. The preliminary rounds are held in the evening; the semifinal and final rounds are in the late afternoon. Prior to the Competition itself, materials and lectures are provided on research, brief writing, and oral advocacy techniques. Registration for the Kirkwood Competition is by team. Each team is required to submit an appellate brief of substantial length and quality and to complete at least two oral arguments, one on each side of an actual case. The first draft of the brief is reviewed and critiqued by the course instructors. The course instructors and the Moot Court Board Presidents score the final draft of the brief. The course also offers digital recording and critiques of practice oral arguments. Panels of judges and local attorneys serve as judges who score the oral argument portion of the Competition. Teams are selected for the quarterfinal, semifinal, and final round of the Competition based on their brief and oral advocacy scores. The final round of the Competition is held before a panel of distinguished judges, and the entire Law School community is invited to attend. Special Instructions: In order to maintain academic standards, enrollment in the Kirkwood Competition is limited to 20 two-person teams. This limit will be strictly enforced. Registration forms will be distributed Spring term. If the program is oversubscribed, a lottery will be held to determine participating teams and to establish a waiting list. The final drop deadline for the course will be on Thursday of the first week of classes. Enrollment in both Autumn (2 units) and Winter (1 unit) terms is required. The final grade for both Autumn and Winter terms and the Professional Skills credit will be awarded upon the completion of the course requirements. Registration and Consent Instructions: Instructions on how to register for the Moot Court competition are sent out to students each year in Spring term for the coming academic year. The registration process is separate from the regular class registration process. Early application and drop deadlines. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory completion of appellate brief and oral arguments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

LAW 7821: Negotiation

As a lawyer, you will probably negotiate more than you do anything else. You will negotiate not just over cases, but any time that you need something that you cannot get alone. You will negotiate with your boss, your clients, your paralegal, and all of their counterparts (plus the lawyers) on the other side. You will negotiate with "the system" whether it is the court, the government, the structure of society, or the law. You will also continue to negotiate with your family, your friends, and yourself. This course is designed to: (1) develop your understanding of negotiation, and your awareness of yourself as a negotiator; (2) give you some tools and concepts for analyzing and preparing for negotiations; (3) enhance your negotiating skills through frequent role plays, reflection, and feedback; and (4) teach you how to keep learning from your own negotiation experience. In addition to negotiation skills and theory (including interviewing, counseling, negotiation, fact analysis, legal an more »
As a lawyer, you will probably negotiate more than you do anything else. You will negotiate not just over cases, but any time that you need something that you cannot get alone. You will negotiate with your boss, your clients, your paralegal, and all of their counterparts (plus the lawyers) on the other side. You will negotiate with "the system" whether it is the court, the government, the structure of society, or the law. You will also continue to negotiate with your family, your friends, and yourself. This course is designed to: (1) develop your understanding of negotiation, and your awareness of yourself as a negotiator; (2) give you some tools and concepts for analyzing and preparing for negotiations; (3) enhance your negotiating skills through frequent role plays, reflection, and feedback; and (4) teach you how to keep learning from your own negotiation experience. In addition to negotiation skills and theory (including interviewing, counseling, negotiation, fact analysis, legal analysis, and collaboration), you will be introduced to issues of representation, ethics, and the place of negotiation in our legal system. The Negotiation Seminar is an intense, interactive course. We will require weekly preparation of readings, simulations, and written assignments. Basically, you will learn by reading about specific research and doing simulated negotiations -- figuring out with the rest of the class what works and what does not, writing about what you're learning, and trying again. Because participation in the simulations is central to the course, attendance at all classes is required. Since we will begin our simulation exercises on the first day of class, all students who are interested in taking the course (whether enrolled or on the wait-list) need to be present for the first class. (Students who are not present will be dropped from the class or waiting list unless they have made previous arrangements with the instructor.) Add-drop decisions need to be resolved at the first class. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and written assignments.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3

LAW 7828: Trial Advocacy Workshop

This lawyering skills course gives students an orientation to and constant practice in most basic pretrial and trial advocacy skills areas. Topics include: taking and defending depositions, trial evidence, including admission of trial exhibits in evidence and use of prior witness statements to refresh and impeach a witness, jury selection and voir dire, opening statements, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, expert witnesses, and closing arguments. Students will try a full jury case through to verdict with use of jurors and usually before a real judge in the courthouse in Palo Alto at the end of the course. Students will also have a chance to watch the jurors deliberate and talk with them after their verdict. The course takes place during seven weeks of the Autumn Quarter with two classes (one lecture and one workshop) per week on most weeks from 4:15-9:00 PM (these usually occur on M, W, or Th), plus the final weekend of jury trials, Saturday and Sunday November 16 and 17. Each more »
This lawyering skills course gives students an orientation to and constant practice in most basic pretrial and trial advocacy skills areas. Topics include: taking and defending depositions, trial evidence, including admission of trial exhibits in evidence and use of prior witness statements to refresh and impeach a witness, jury selection and voir dire, opening statements, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, expert witnesses, and closing arguments. Students will try a full jury case through to verdict with use of jurors and usually before a real judge in the courthouse in Palo Alto at the end of the course. Students will also have a chance to watch the jurors deliberate and talk with them after their verdict. The course takes place during seven weeks of the Autumn Quarter with two classes (one lecture and one workshop) per week on most weeks from 4:15-9:00 PM (these usually occur on M, W, or Th), plus the final weekend of jury trials, Saturday and Sunday November 16 and 17. Each day's ending time will vary; most sessions will end before 9:00 PM. For details, please refer to the 2019 Trial Advocacy Workshop Schedule at https://tinyurl.com/TrialAd2019. The format for each topic begins with a lecture/discussion featuring video vignettes of various techniques and a live demonstration by an expert trial lawyer. Following the discussion portion of each topic are small group sessions during which each student practices the skills involved. Constructive feedback is given after each exercise by two of our faculty of very experienced Bay Area litigators and judges. Most exercises are also videoed for further one-on-one critique by another faculty member. The central philosophy of the workshop is that skills are best acquired in an experiential manner by seeing and doing. Frequent short, well-defined exercises followed by immediate constructive feedback in a non-competitive, non-threatening atmosphere provide the core of the program. The workshop directors are Tim Hallahan, Judge Sallie Kim and Sara Peters. Tim has taught similar programs at Harvard Law School, the University of San Francisco School of Law, Berkeley Law, the California Continuing Education of the Bar, and in private and public interest law firms around the country. Sallie is a United States Magistrate Judge in San Francisco and was a partner in a civil litigation firm and also previously taught a class at SLS and served as Associate Dean for Student Affairs. Sara is a trial attorney for a personal injury law firm in San Francisco. She graduated from Stanford Law School in 2008 and coaches the Stanford Law School mock trial team. Special Instructions: If you haven't taken Evidence you must contact Tim Hallahan before the course begins for some brief pre-course reading assignments. There are no papers or tests, but attendance at every session is required. Since we will begin our trial advocacy exercises on the first day of class, all students who are interested in taking the course (whether enrolled or on the wait-list) need to be present for the first class. (Students who are not present will be dropped from the class or waiting list unless they have made previous arrangements with the professor.) Add-drop decisions need to be resolved at the first class; no drops will be permitted thereafter. Exceptions to this rule will be made by petition only. Mandatory attendance. Elements used in grading: Attendance and in-class assignments. In addition, the Trial Advocacy Workshop is approved to offer Experiential Learning (EL) Credit. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

LAW 7830: Topics in American Legal Practice

(Formerly Law 733) This course is designed to introduce international students to American legal practice. To do this, the course begins in the spring quarter by working with students to look ahead to their summer experience and begin to identify ways in which the culture or norms of the practice setting might be distinctive, or otherwise differ from the legal, political, or workplace culture of their home country. Then in the fall quarter, students are asked to write a 10-page paper, situated in the relevant literature(s), that uses the summer experience to examine one such set of issues. Elements used in grading: Final Paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 7836: Advanced Legal Writing: Appellate Litigation

This course will bring the Instructor's decades of experience in high-stakes legal writing to bear on the drafting of appellate briefs: what's good, what's bad; what works, what doesn't; and how to get from here (your frustratingly blank computer screen) to there (a finished brief that assists, persuades, and impresses appellate judges). Through a combination of lectures, discussion, selected readings, and writing exercises (both individual and collaborative), we will cover most of the key topics in appellate writing, including: The differences between appellate and trial-court writing; How appellate judges think, and how to give them what they need; Basic appellate procedure; The pervasive influence that the standard of review has on everything in the brief; Identifying and articulating winning issues and themes (and the difference between the two); Framing appellate issues to advantage your client and neutralize your opponent's best arguments; Getting your arms around the trial-court more »
This course will bring the Instructor's decades of experience in high-stakes legal writing to bear on the drafting of appellate briefs: what's good, what's bad; what works, what doesn't; and how to get from here (your frustratingly blank computer screen) to there (a finished brief that assists, persuades, and impresses appellate judges). Through a combination of lectures, discussion, selected readings, and writing exercises (both individual and collaborative), we will cover most of the key topics in appellate writing, including: The differences between appellate and trial-court writing; How appellate judges think, and how to give them what they need; Basic appellate procedure; The pervasive influence that the standard of review has on everything in the brief; Identifying and articulating winning issues and themes (and the difference between the two); Framing appellate issues to advantage your client and neutralize your opponent's best arguments; Getting your arms around the trial-court record; The components of an appellate brief, their purposes, and what it takes to make each component successful; Crafting a narrative that grips the imagination; Structuring appellate arguments; Constructing great headings and subheadings; Writing clear, graceful, properly constructed sentences devoid of brain-killing ambiguities; Linking the entire brief together--using headings, paragraphs, sentences, and individual words--so that it seems to flow effortlessly from point to point to reach the seemingly ineluctable conclusion that your client should win; Lessons from scientific studies of cognition and reading; Cultivating the critical distance you need to edit your own writing; Editing other lawyers' writing effectively; Obtaining discretionary appellate review; and Typography and layout. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Hirsch, S. (PI)

LAW 7846: Elements of Policy Analysis

This one-credit course is designed to support students undertaking public policy analysis projects in the Policy Lab and in other policy-based courses. The course will help students gain facility with basic policy methods and approaches common to public policy research and Policy Lab projects. The core session of the course consists of three hours of classroom instruction on a Saturday morning (the Saturday at the end of the first week of classes) with emphasis on thinking like a policy analyst (as distinguished from an advocate or lawyer), scoping policy problems, promoting and assessing evidence quality, and making valid (and avoiding invalid) inferences. The afternoon session offers three hours of instruction focused on designing and evaluating programs to improve individuals' lives (for example programs aimed at reducing homelessness or opioid addiction). Then, during the early part of the term, students may choose at least two topics from among a series of short workshops includin more »
This one-credit course is designed to support students undertaking public policy analysis projects in the Policy Lab and in other policy-based courses. The course will help students gain facility with basic policy methods and approaches common to public policy research and Policy Lab projects. The core session of the course consists of three hours of classroom instruction on a Saturday morning (the Saturday at the end of the first week of classes) with emphasis on thinking like a policy analyst (as distinguished from an advocate or lawyer), scoping policy problems, promoting and assessing evidence quality, and making valid (and avoiding invalid) inferences. The afternoon session offers three hours of instruction focused on designing and evaluating programs to improve individuals' lives (for example programs aimed at reducing homelessness or opioid addiction). Then, during the early part of the term, students may choose at least two topics from among a series of short workshops including (1) interviewing clients and other stakeholders (especially where ethnic and cultural differences may be salient), (2) policy research tools and strategies, (3) design thinking for law and policy, (4) charting, graphing, and visualizing data, and (5) policy writing. With guidance from their faculty instructors, students may then draw on the skills developed in this introductory seminar to analyze a public policy problem, develop potential strategies to address it, weigh the pros and cons of strategy options, and produce a final product that may offer options or recommendations to a policy client, suggestions for implementing such recommendations, and techniques to assess the effectiveness of implementation. Attention Non-Law Students: See Non-Law Student Add Request Form at https://law.stanford.edu/education/courses/non-law-students/ to enroll in this class. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1

LAW 8001: Corporate Governance and Practice Seminar

The seminar on corporate governance meets in the Autumn and Winter quarters and forms the core of the LL.M. Program in Corporate Governance & Practice. The course, designed to be taken in conjunction with Corporations in Autumn, takes an economic approach to the analysis of corporate law. In particular, we ask why American corporate law has its particular structure. We will seek to understand how the separation of ownership and control produces agency costs, and the ways in which corporate law seeks to remedy these through techniques like disclosure, fiduciary duties and shareholder litigation, voting, and hostile takeovers. We will read and discuss ongoing debates among scholars and practitioners about the agency cost framework, the merits and limits of current legal policies, and the role of institutional arrangements like activist shareholders. We will also consider the relevance of these disputes, and the effectiveness of corporate law and governance more generally, in the context more »
The seminar on corporate governance meets in the Autumn and Winter quarters and forms the core of the LL.M. Program in Corporate Governance & Practice. The course, designed to be taken in conjunction with Corporations in Autumn, takes an economic approach to the analysis of corporate law. In particular, we ask why American corporate law has its particular structure. We will seek to understand how the separation of ownership and control produces agency costs, and the ways in which corporate law seeks to remedy these through techniques like disclosure, fiduciary duties and shareholder litigation, voting, and hostile takeovers. We will read and discuss ongoing debates among scholars and practitioners about the agency cost framework, the merits and limits of current legal policies, and the role of institutional arrangements like activist shareholders. We will also consider the relevance of these disputes, and the effectiveness of corporate law and governance more generally, in the context of a variety of real-life incidents. No knowledge of economics is presupposed, so the course will also introduce basic economics and finance concepts necessary to understand these concepts. Some course sessions, largely in the Winter, will feature outside speakers who will complement the discussions with real-world examples drawn from practice. Attendance and active participation are important to the success of the seminar and an important factor in the overall grade. Students are expected to have carefully read and reviewed assigned materials in advance of each session. Students will be required to submit short reflection papers that evaluate, critique, and discuss some or all of the key topics reviewed in the previous week's session. Students may also be asked to prepare presentations to help guide discussions. The class will be graded H/P/R/F in Autumn Quarter and Winter Quarter. This course is required for and limited to students in the Corporate Governance and Practice LL.M. Program. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and assignments.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Jennings, A. (PI)

LAW 8002: Environmental Law and Policy Colloquium

The Environmental Law & Policy Colloquium offers students the opportunity to learn about cutting-edge legal topics related to environmental law, broadly defined to include, among other areas, pollution control, natural resources management, and energy development. The colloquium meets in two quarters. During the autumn quarter, students will learn about core concepts that underlie the administration of environmental law, exploring ideas from economics, philosophy, natural science, and law. In the autumn quarter, students will begin to develop a capstone research paper on a contemporary environmental law issue. During the spring quarter, the students will write and present their research papers. Elements used in grading include attendance and participation, problem sets, small writing assignments, and a final paper. This course is required for students in the Environmental Law & Policy LL.M. Program. All other students are welcome but will need instructor permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Polk, A. (PI)

LAW 8003: International Economic Law, Business & Policy (IELBP) Colloquium

This course enables IELBP advanced degree students to explore selected issues, case studies and policy debates in international economic law and business, global political economy, and international economic dispute resolution in a highly interactive seminar. The course is a complement to the other core degree requirements of the LLM in IELBP and is discussion-oriented. The course offers students the opportunity to engage in dialogue with experts in the field (including Stanford Law faculty and interdisciplinary scholars from other schools, departments or programs at Stanford University). The course takes on a wide-ranging approach: we will examine legal issues confronting international business while also focusing on cutting-edge debates arising out of economic globalization; we will explore the complex architecture of international economic law, unpacking how international institutions and public international law sources (formal and informal) regulate: i) cross-border business trans more »
This course enables IELBP advanced degree students to explore selected issues, case studies and policy debates in international economic law and business, global political economy, and international economic dispute resolution in a highly interactive seminar. The course is a complement to the other core degree requirements of the LLM in IELBP and is discussion-oriented. The course offers students the opportunity to engage in dialogue with experts in the field (including Stanford Law faculty and interdisciplinary scholars from other schools, departments or programs at Stanford University). The course takes on a wide-ranging approach: we will examine legal issues confronting international business while also focusing on cutting-edge debates arising out of economic globalization; we will explore the complex architecture of international economic law, unpacking how international institutions and public international law sources (formal and informal) regulate: i) cross-border business transactions between private parties, ii) international economic relations between and among states, and iii) cross-border economic conduct by states, international organizations, and private actors. Students are expected to have carefully read assigned materials in advance of each session, and to actively participate during class. Grades for the colloquium are based on students' papers and their classroom performance (e.g., preparation, participation, attendance, etc.). The course extends over two quarters (autumn and spring), and students are required to complete both quarters in order to satisfy the program requirement. Topics in the Fall quarter will focus on developments in world trade law, international monetary cooperation, international investment law, economic integration and development, international taxation, international arbitration, and international antitrust law. Topics in the Spring quarter will be selected based on students' interests, as well as pressing policy concerns in international commerce, such as climate change and national security.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 8004: Law, Science, and Technology Colloquium

The Law, Science & Technology Colloquium offers students in the Law, Science & Technology LLM Program the opportunity to discuss cutting-edge legal issues at the intersection of law and technology with leading experts in the field, including Stanford faculty, visiting scholars, technology and IP lawyers, entrepreneurs, and executives from Silicon Valley technology companies. For organizational purposes, the course is divided into units reflecting different areas of law and technology. Each begins with a keystone lecture that introduces students to the unit's doctrinal and theoretical themes. After the keystone lecture, each unit includes one or more topical lectures taught by experts representing a diverse cross-section of viewpoints from academia, legal practice, and business. Students are expected to have carefully read the assigned materials in advance of each session, and to actively participate during class. Students will also write papers dealing with the units' themes. Grades for the colloquium are based on students' papers and their classroom performance (e.g., preparation, participation, attendance, etc.). This course is restricted to students in the Law, Science, and Technology LLM program, and satisfies their "colloquium requirement" for the fall quarter.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Du Mont, J. (PI)
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