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101 - 110 of 123 results for: LAW ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LAW 7014: Constitutional Theory

The guiding question of this course will be how we should think about the role of the U.S. Constitution in American law and American life. In considering this issue, we will address debates about constitutional interpretation (including both originalism and living constitutionalism), the nature and features of constitutional change within the American context, the role of federalism and the separation of powers in the constitutional scheme, and the nature of American constitutionalism as opposed to English and continental European models. We will tackle these debates in the context of some specific contemporary controversies about the Constitution, including: How do the civil rights movement and other social movements impact our understanding of the Constitution?; Does the Constitution reject a European-style inquisitorial process in favor of an Anglo-American vision of due process?; How important is consensus within the Supreme Court to establishing the legitimacy of constitutional me more »
The guiding question of this course will be how we should think about the role of the U.S. Constitution in American law and American life. In considering this issue, we will address debates about constitutional interpretation (including both originalism and living constitutionalism), the nature and features of constitutional change within the American context, the role of federalism and the separation of powers in the constitutional scheme, and the nature of American constitutionalism as opposed to English and continental European models. We will tackle these debates in the context of some specific contemporary controversies about the Constitution, including: How do the civil rights movement and other social movements impact our understanding of the Constitution?; Does the Constitution reject a European-style inquisitorial process in favor of an Anglo-American vision of due process?; How important is consensus within the Supreme Court to establishing the legitimacy of constitutional meanings?; Why do we have nine Supreme Court justices, and; What is the Constitution, and how much does it include outside of the written document? Throughout we will be contemplating the extent to which our interpretation of the constitution depends on our vision of American democracy and the good society. Requirements for the course include regular class participation and either four response papers or a substantial research paper; students who take the research paper option will receive four units and 'R' credit. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Special Instructions: This class is limited to 16 students by lottery. If applicable, openings will be filled from the waitlist in waitlist order. Four additional spots may be reserved for 2Ls at the discretion of the instructor. If determined by the instructor, four 2Ls will be admitted from the waitlist in waitlist order. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation; Response Papers or Final Paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Meyler, B. (PI)

LAW 7041: Statutory Interpretation

Statutory law is the dominant source of contemporary law, and it is the form of law that lawyers are likely to confront most often in almost any area of practice. It is also an area of vibrant intellectual debate, as scholars, Supreme Court justices, and others debate the methods and aims of statutory interpretation. This course will stress both the practical and theoretical dimensions of interpretation. Students will learn and apply the methods of statutory interpretation. We will also spend considerable time on contemporary controversies, such as debates about textualist, purposive and dynamic interpretation; about the use of legislative history and canons of construction; about the special interpretive problems that arise in the context of direct democracy; and about the democratic and constitutional foundations of statutory interpretation itself. Readings will draw from political science as well as law. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Schacter, J. (PI)

LAW 7042: Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and the Law

This seminar will focus on how the law regulates sexuality. We will approach the material as an exercise in advanced constitutional law, exploring how courts have used--or might use--federal or state constitutional provisions to address issues regarding a wide array of issues involving sexuality. The core of the class will relate to contemporary controversies concerning sexual orientation and gender identity (including, for example, how sexual orientation and gender identity are defined, regulation of sexual conduct, marriage and parenting rights of same-sex couples, and religious liberty debates, among others). But we will also discuss other issues, including polygamy/polyamory and asexuality. We will maintain an interdisciplinary focus throughout as we consider how social, cultural, and political forces shape, and are shaped by, legal doctrine. All students taking the seminar for 2 units will either write a final research paper of approximately 18 pages (for R credit) or a take a fin more »
This seminar will focus on how the law regulates sexuality. We will approach the material as an exercise in advanced constitutional law, exploring how courts have used--or might use--federal or state constitutional provisions to address issues regarding a wide array of issues involving sexuality. The core of the class will relate to contemporary controversies concerning sexual orientation and gender identity (including, for example, how sexual orientation and gender identity are defined, regulation of sexual conduct, marriage and parenting rights of same-sex couples, and religious liberty debates, among others). But we will also discuss other issues, including polygamy/polyamory and asexuality. We will maintain an interdisciplinary focus throughout as we consider how social, cultural, and political forces shape, and are shaped by, legal doctrine. All students taking the seminar for 2 units will either write a final research paper of approximately 18 pages (for R credit) or a take a final exam. Students who wish to write a longer R paper (approx. 26 pages) may enroll in the seminar for 3 units. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the paper length. Elements used in grading: Class participation; and paper or exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Schacter, J. (PI)

LAW 7051: Local Government Law

This course will examine the source, scope and limits of local government power. It will consider the relationship of local governments to state and federal government and of the relationship of local governments to the individuals and communities within and around them. Specific themes will include the potential of local governments to be responsive democratic communities, the potential of local governments to become isolated or exclusive enclaves, and the effect of local governments on the metropolitan political economy. The course will examine state and federal doctrine that affects local government, political/ social theory and urban planning/ development literature. Students may write papers in lieu of the final exam. Upon instructor consent, students interested in writing should enroll in Law 427-0-02. Students who do not receive a spot in section 02 may enroll in section 01. Elements used in grading: Exam or paper and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Ford, R. (PI)

LAW 7063: Youth Law and Policy

This course examines current issues in youth law and policy with a focus on the potential and collateral effects of law on certain subpopulations of vulnerable youth. Substantively, the course focuses on case law and statutes in delinquency, dependency, education, public benefits, and health access with an attention to cross-section themes of poverty, economic justice, race, and youth voice. By the end of the course, students will have developed a better understanding of how litigation, legislation, and policy in youth law come about through examining recent developments in the field and the tools advocates have used to enact change. Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from the exam section (01) into paper section (02), with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments; Exam or Final Paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

LAW 7071: Philanthropy and Civil Society

Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 units. Cross-listed with Education ( EDUC 374), Political Science ( POLISCI 334) and Sociology ( SOC 374).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 7510: Research Design for Empirical Legal Studies

Empirical legal studies have become popular in the U.S. and are now spreading to non-U.S. law faculties as well. Usually the term applies to analyses of quantitative data and the researcher relies on data collected by others. But the term "empirical" properly encompasses both qualitative and quantitative data, including interviews, legal documents, survey research and experimental results. Analysts interested in using such data need to understand how they were collected, in order to decide what data can appropriately be used to answer different kinds of questions. Often to answer the questions of interest, a researcher needs to collect new data, which poses challenging questions about how to design an empirical research study. Answering these questions appropriately is important to ensure publication in a peer-reviewed journal, which is becoming increasingly important to legal academia. This seminar will introduce students to the wide range of research methods that can be used to answe more »
Empirical legal studies have become popular in the U.S. and are now spreading to non-U.S. law faculties as well. Usually the term applies to analyses of quantitative data and the researcher relies on data collected by others. But the term "empirical" properly encompasses both qualitative and quantitative data, including interviews, legal documents, survey research and experimental results. Analysts interested in using such data need to understand how they were collected, in order to decide what data can appropriately be used to answer different kinds of questions. Often to answer the questions of interest, a researcher needs to collect new data, which poses challenging questions about how to design an empirical research study. Answering these questions appropriately is important to ensure publication in a peer-reviewed journal, which is becoming increasingly important to legal academia. This seminar will introduce students to the wide range of research methods that can be used to answer empirical questions, provide a framework for choosing among methods, and explain how to use the methods. The project for the quarter is to design an empirical research study on a topic of your choice. Special Instructions: JD students can take the class for 3-4 units. SPILS students must take this class for 4 units. Students taking the course for 4 units must attend the additional session on Thursday, which is optional for others. After the term begins, JD students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which can potentially satisfy the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Consent Application for JD students: To apply for this course, JD students must e-mail the instructors for permission to enroll. This course is REQUIRED for all SPILS fellows and BY CONSENT for all other students. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, class presentation, written assignments and final paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

LAW 7807: Facilitation for Attorneys

Most lawyers and other professionals spend a significant amount of time in meetings and working in teams or groups for a variety of purposes, and many report that this can be a frustrating experience. As the practice of law becomes more complex, it includes more and more situations where groups of people need to work together planning complex legal strategies, developing firm policies, working with corporations or other multi-person clients, or participating in shareholder meetings, public commissions and councils, corporate and non-profit Board of Directors meetings. Group functionality and outcomes can be significantly improved by any group member who has the awareness and skills of a facilitator, whether or not that person is formally designated as the facilitator. The interactive class methodology will combine discussion with many exercises and roleplays, putting facilitation tools into practice every step of the way. We will examine group dynamics and learn skills used by professi more »
Most lawyers and other professionals spend a significant amount of time in meetings and working in teams or groups for a variety of purposes, and many report that this can be a frustrating experience. As the practice of law becomes more complex, it includes more and more situations where groups of people need to work together planning complex legal strategies, developing firm policies, working with corporations or other multi-person clients, or participating in shareholder meetings, public commissions and councils, corporate and non-profit Board of Directors meetings. Group functionality and outcomes can be significantly improved by any group member who has the awareness and skills of a facilitator, whether or not that person is formally designated as the facilitator. The interactive class methodology will combine discussion with many exercises and roleplays, putting facilitation tools into practice every step of the way. We will examine group dynamics and learn skills used by professional facilitators to prevent common problems and elicit the best work of a group. We will explore how to prepare effectively with clear goals, collaborative problem definition, inclusive process design and a well-structured agenda. We will also discuss and practice core meeting management skills such as how to balance voice and participation, build consensus, inspire creativity and promote principled evaluation and decision-making. Finally, we will identify and apply communication skills that keep group sessions productive and tools to manage difficult moments and problem behaviors. Class Schedule dates: Oct. 18th. (4:00 -- 9p.m.), Oct 19th. (9 -- 5:00) and Oct. 27th. (9 -- 5:00). Elements used in grading: Class attendance, participation and final paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Notini, J. (PI)

LAW 7815: Advanced Legal Writing: Business Transactions

This course offers comprehensive preparation for practice of the transactional lawyer. Students will learn the foundational tools necessary to write clear, effective, plain language business contracts and analyze other transactional writings used to manage and document complex business transactions. The course provides interactive lectures and a wide range of realistic drafting and research exercises, completed both inside and outside of class, both individually and collaboratively. These exercises help students improve their research, analysis, drafting, and editing skills and develop sensitivity to the expectations of attorneys and clients with whom they will be working. Students will learn the research and analytical tools necessary to interpret provisions in a variety of business agreements. Issues related to ethics in a transactional practice will also be addressed. The course should appeal especially to students interested in working for a law firm and practicing transactional la more »
This course offers comprehensive preparation for practice of the transactional lawyer. Students will learn the foundational tools necessary to write clear, effective, plain language business contracts and analyze other transactional writings used to manage and document complex business transactions. The course provides interactive lectures and a wide range of realistic drafting and research exercises, completed both inside and outside of class, both individually and collaboratively. These exercises help students improve their research, analysis, drafting, and editing skills and develop sensitivity to the expectations of attorneys and clients with whom they will be working. Students will learn the research and analytical tools necessary to interpret provisions in a variety of business agreements. Issues related to ethics in a transactional practice will also be addressed. The course should appeal especially to students interested in working for a law firm and practicing transactional law (be it corporate, venture, debt, intellectual property, mergers and acquisitions, entertainment, real estate, etc.). It will also appeal to those interested in business litigation, or those curious about the work of transactional lawyers. SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS: Students on the waitlist for the course will be admitted if spots are available on the basis of priority and degree program. Early drop deadline: Students may not drop this course after first week of class. Corporations ( Law 1013) is a prerequisite for all but LLM (CGP) students. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments, and final paper. Please consult the syllabus for paper and assignment deadlines.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Bautista, M. (PI)

LAW 7820: Moot Court

The major moot court activity at Stanford Law School is the Marion Rice Kirkwood Memorial Competition, which takes place each year during Autumn and Winter terms. Autumn term will be dedicated to brief writing and completion of the written portion of the Competition; the oral argument portion of the Competition will be conducted during the first four to five weeks of Winter term. Students on externship and in clinics may enroll, if permitted by their respective programs. In Autumn term there are only a few class meetings, including a guest lecture on ethics, which can be recorded. In addition, there are individually scheduled conferences. In Winter term, there are optional class meetings and practice arguments. Participation in the oral argument competition is mandatory, which includes attendance at the semifinal and final arguments. The preliminary rounds are held in the evening; the semifinal and final rounds are in the late afternoon. Prior to the Competition itself, materials and l more »
The major moot court activity at Stanford Law School is the Marion Rice Kirkwood Memorial Competition, which takes place each year during Autumn and Winter terms. Autumn term will be dedicated to brief writing and completion of the written portion of the Competition; the oral argument portion of the Competition will be conducted during the first four to five weeks of Winter term. Students on externship and in clinics may enroll, if permitted by their respective programs. In Autumn term there are only a few class meetings, including a guest lecture on ethics, which can be recorded. In addition, there are individually scheduled conferences. In Winter term, there are optional class meetings and practice arguments. Participation in the oral argument competition is mandatory, which includes attendance at the semifinal and final arguments. The preliminary rounds are held in the evening; the semifinal and final rounds are in the late afternoon. Prior to the Competition itself, materials and lectures are provided on research, brief writing, and oral advocacy techniques. Registration for the Kirkwood Competition is by team. Each team is required to submit an appellate brief of substantial length and quality and to complete at least two oral arguments, one on each side of an actual case. The first draft of the brief is reviewed and critiqued by the course instructors. The course instructors and the Moot Court Board Presidents score the final draft of the brief. The course also offers digital recording and critiques of practice oral arguments. Panels of judges and local attorneys serve as judges who score the oral argument portion of the Competition. Teams are selected for the quarterfinal, semifinal, and final round of the Competition based on their brief and oral advocacy scores. The final round of the Competition is held before a panel of distinguished judges, and the entire Law School community is invited to attend. Special Instructions: In order to maintain academic standards, enrollment in the Kirkwood Competition is limited to 20 two-person teams. This limit will be strictly enforced. Registration forms will be distributed Spring term. If the program is oversubscribed, a lottery will be held to determine participating teams and to establish a waiting list. The final drop deadline for the course will be on Thursday of the first week of classes. Enrollment in both Autumn (2 units) and Winter (1 unit) terms is required. The final grade for both Autumn and Winter terms and the Professional Skills credit will be awarded upon the completion of the course requirements. Registration and Consent Instructions: Instructions on how to register for the Moot Court competition are sent out to students each year in Spring term for the coming academic year. The registration process is separate from the regular class registration process. Early application and drop deadlines. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory completion of appellate brief and oral arguments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
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