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1 - 10 of 124 results for: LAW

LAW 201: Civil Procedure I

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. This course is a study of the process of civil litigation from the commencement of a lawsuit through final judgment under modern statutes and rules of court, with emphasis on the federal rules of civil procedure. May include class participation, written assignments, or other elements. Your instructor will advise you of the basis for grading.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

LAW 205: Contracts

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It provides exposure to basic contract law. The course will identify the scope and purpose of the legal protection accorded to interests predicated on contract and will focus on problems of contract formation, interpretation, performance, and remedies for breach.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

LAW 219: Legal Research and Writing

Legal Research and Writing is a two-unit course taught as a simulation. Students work on a legal problem starting with an initial interview, and they conduct fact investigation and legal research related to that problem. Students receive rigorous training in reading and analyzing legal authority, and in using persuasive strategies--legal analysis, narrative, rhetoric, legal theory, and public policy--to frame and develop legal arguments. Students write predictive memos and persuasive briefs, and are introduced to the professional norms of ethics, timeliness, and courtesy. This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

LAW 223: Torts

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It considers issues involved in determining whether the law should require a person to compensate for harm intentionally or unintentionally caused. These problems arise in situations as diverse as automobile collisions, operations of nuclear facilities, and consumption of defective food products. Among other considerations, the course explores various resolutions in terms of their social, economic, and political implications.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

LAW 240A: Discussion (1L): Asian Americans and the Law

This discussion seminar will consider the legal treatment of Asian Americans. We will read materials about the history of citizenship, exclusion, and internment, and discuss contemporary issues affecting the individuals of Asian descent in the American legal system. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Ho, D. (PI)

LAW 240B: Discussion (1L): Comparative Approaches to Law and Inequality

In this discussion seminar, we will examine how various countries across Europe and Latin American, as well as the United States, seek to deploy law to promote equality for subordinated groups---including especially racial minorities and women. We will examine how laws seeking to promote racial and gender equality, often developed first in the United States, came to be transplanted elsewhere, and how in the process these were transformed in significant ways. Topics will include anti-discrimination law, harassment law, affirmative action (including but not limited to quotas), and parental leave. How and why did the law change as it was transplanted from one legal system and culture into another? To the extent that different legal systems have adopted different approaches, which is preferable---and according to what metrics? Moreover, to the extent that we prefer an approach deployed elsewhere, what are the chances of adopting some version of it here in the United States (or vice versa)? This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Kessler, A. (PI)

LAW 240C: Discussion (1L): Corporate Social Responsibility

How can a company's managers safeguard the firm's financial value for its shareholders while, at the same time, operating ethically and purposively benefiting other stakeholders, including its employees and the communities in which the firm operates? Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is rooted in the idea that shareholder value is not the only measure of a firm's value and, indeed, that the exclusive pursuit of profits may produce social harms. The seminar will consider a variety of legal issues related to CSR, including: 1. The meaning and measure of environmental, social, and governance (ESG) criteria for corporations. 2. The voluntary or mandatory disclosure of a company's environmental and social harms or risks. 3. When is it legally and ethically appropriate for corporate managers or institutional investors to compromise shareholder value in the pursuit of social and environment goals? 4. Constituency statutes and benefit corporations that reflect interests other than profit m more »
How can a company's managers safeguard the firm's financial value for its shareholders while, at the same time, operating ethically and purposively benefiting other stakeholders, including its employees and the communities in which the firm operates? Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is rooted in the idea that shareholder value is not the only measure of a firm's value and, indeed, that the exclusive pursuit of profits may produce social harms. The seminar will consider a variety of legal issues related to CSR, including: 1. The meaning and measure of environmental, social, and governance (ESG) criteria for corporations. 2. The voluntary or mandatory disclosure of a company's environmental and social harms or risks. 3. When is it legally and ethically appropriate for corporate managers or institutional investors to compromise shareholder value in the pursuit of social and environment goals? 4. Constituency statutes and benefit corporations that reflect interests other than profit maximization. 5. The power of investors to influence corporate behavior through capital allocation-investments (including impact investing) and divestments-and shareholder activism. 6. The power of other stakeholders, including consumers and employees, to influence corporate behavior. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

LAW 240D: Discussion (1L): Criminal Legal Histories

This seminar will trace the roots of four critical aspects of the American criminal justice system: jury independence and the power of jurors to render verdicts according to conscience; plea bargaining and the progressive marginalization of juries; penitentiaries and the displacement of other forms of punishment; and the criminalization of recreational drugs. Though modern criminal justice policy will inform our conversation, the readings will be historical with an emphasis on primary source documents. We will examine the forces driving legal evolution and the historian's tools in mapping those forces. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Fisher, G. (PI)

LAW 240E: Discussion (1L): Dress Codes: Law, Status, Sex, and Power

Dress codes may seem a bit old fashioned, but in fact we are constantly told who should wear what and when. Rules---written and implied---divide formal from casual attire and children's clothing from that of adults. There are rules for what to wear in each season of the year and rules about the right attire for different times of the day. And, of course, there are rules about the types of clothing men may wear and about the clothing suitable for women. Adherence to such rules is considered by many to be an important signal of breeding and even character: accordingly, immediate social sanctions---and indirect professional consequences---can follow from breaking them. Some dress codes are job requirements or house rules of an organization or establishment---flouting them can get one fired, kicked out of school or barred from a restaurant. Finally, there are laws about clothing, enforced by police or government officials. Break these rules and you may find yourself facing a fine or even a more »
Dress codes may seem a bit old fashioned, but in fact we are constantly told who should wear what and when. Rules---written and implied---divide formal from casual attire and children's clothing from that of adults. There are rules for what to wear in each season of the year and rules about the right attire for different times of the day. And, of course, there are rules about the types of clothing men may wear and about the clothing suitable for women. Adherence to such rules is considered by many to be an important signal of breeding and even character: accordingly, immediate social sanctions---and indirect professional consequences---can follow from breaking them. Some dress codes are job requirements or house rules of an organization or establishment---flouting them can get one fired, kicked out of school or barred from a restaurant. Finally, there are laws about clothing, enforced by police or government officials. Break these rules and you may find yourself facing a fine or even a jail sentence. Why is attire so rule bound? Why and when is clothing important enough to become the subject of written treatises, rules and regulations, legislative proclamations and judicial edicts? This seminar will explore dress codes, from the sumptuary laws of the late Middle Ages to the unstated norms of the 21st century, and discover what they can tell us about the significance of clothing---our most conspicuous medium of self-expression---and its relationship to individual identity, community cohesiveness and social order. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Ford, R. (PI)

LAW 240F: Discussion (1L): Feminist Jurisprudence

This discussion seminar will consider some of the major theoretical writings of the past 40 years in feminist legal theory, and explore the application of different theoretical approaches to contemporary issues in the law. Likely readings include Catherine MacKinnon, Robin West, Janet Halley, and Angela Harris. Possible topics include campus sexual misconduct codes, the Me Too movement, the meaning of consent, and the legal treatment of the family. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Fried, B. (PI)
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