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1 - 10 of 52 results for: JEWISHST ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

JEWISHST 3C: Talking About Jews (HISTORY 3C)

Professors Beinin and Zipperstein will initiate discussions on a broad range of topics related to Jews and Jewish identity in the modern world and then invite the class to join in the discussion. Topics include: Who are the Jews, secularism, Jewish capitalists and leftists, anti-Semitism, Israel and Zionism, Jews in American life. For the one unit option attendance at the discussions is required. For the three unit option, students will do the prescribed readings and attend a discussion section.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

JEWISHST 5: Biblical Greek (CLASSICS 6G, RELIGST 171A)

(Formerly CLASSGRK 5.) This is a one term intensive class in Biblical Greek. After quickly learning the basics of the language, we will then dive right into readings from the New Testament and the Septuagint, which is the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. No previous knowledge of Greek required. If demand is high for a second term, an additional quarter will be offered in the Spring.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Melzer, A. (PI)

JEWISHST 5B: Biblical Greek (CLASSICS 7G)

(Formerly CLASSGRK 6) This is a continuation of the Winter Quarter Biblical Greek Course. Pre-requisite: CLASSICS 6G (Formerly CLASSGRK 5) or a similar introductory course in Ancient Greek.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JEWISHST 13C: Talking About Jews (HISTORY 13C)

Professors Beinin and Zipperstein will initiate discussions on a broad range of topics related to Jews and Jewish identity in the modern world and then invite the class to join in the discussion. Topics include: Who are the Jews, secularism, Jewish capitalists and leftists, anti-Semitism, Israel and Zionism, Jews in American life. For the one unit option attendance at the discussions is required. For the three unit option, students will do the prescribed readings and attend a discussion section.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JEWISHST 19N: Everyone Eats: Food, Religion and Culture (CSRE 19N, RELIGST 19N)

Food is one of the most essential aspects of the human experience. The decisions and choices we make about food define who we have been, who we are now, and who we want to become. In this seminar we will study how food habits have shaped religious traditions, and vice versa, how religious traditions have shaped food ways. Some traditions are centered around food regiments such as the dietary laws, derived from biblical law that shapes Jewish and Christian tradition very differently. Indeed, many religious and ethical thinkers, as well as anthropologists, have interpreted the meanings of the dietary laws very differently. Further, in many religious traditions the killing of animals and consumption of meat is deeply fraught. We will explore the history of food practices and their contemporary impact; the connections between food, religion, and identity; the meanings that religious thinkers and anthropologists have attributed to food habits; as well as the creative translations of religious traditions into contemporary food ethics by various social movements and groups, predominantly in the U.S..
Terms: not given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JEWISHST 37Q: Zionism and the Novel (COMPLIT 37Q)

At the end of the nineteenth century, Zionism emerged as a political movement to establish a national homeland for the Jews, eventually leading to the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. This seminar uses novels to explore the changes in Zionism, the roots of the conflict in the Middle East, and the potentials for the future. We will take a close look at novels by Israelis, both Jewish and Arab, in order to understand multiple perspectives, and we will also consider works by authors from the North America and from Europe.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

JEWISHST 38A: Germany and the World Wars, 1870-1990 (HISTORY 38A)

(Same as HISTORY 138A. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 138A.) This course examines Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. During this time, Germany ushered in five regimes and two world wars, seesawing between material ruin and economic prosperity on the frontline of Europe¿s military and ideological rifts. Beginning with Bismarck¿s wars of unification, the class spans World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sheffer, E. (PI)

JEWISHST 39S: The Other Side: Ethnography and Travel Writing through Jewish, Christian and Muslim Eyes (RELIGST 39S)

In an age of reality television and social media, we are bombarded with snapshots of the exotic, monstrous, and bizarre. Yet despite their quantity, these images pale in comparison to the qualities of terror, wonder and curiosity that ancient travelers evoked in their encounters with foreign lands and peoples. Early ethnographers, too, painstakingly explored the beliefs and practices of unfamiliar peoples sometimes very close to home. This course surveys their most vivid writings, from ancient Greece to the colonization of the New World, focusing on the relation between fascination with the other and the author's own religious imagination. In particular, it introduces the contributions of Jewish travelers and ethnographers to this history, which has often been written from the standpoint of imperial, ecclesiastical or colonial power. It stresses literary continuities across three general periods (ancient, medieval, and colonial), showing how remarkably consistent patterns of identification spring from diverse encounters.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Redfield, J. (PI)

JEWISHST 84S: Between Toleration and Persecution: Iran and its Minorities in the Twentieth Century (HISTORY 84S)

What does it mean to be Jewish or Christian in a country where most citizens are categorized as Shi'i Muslims? How have Kurds and Azeris figured into Iranian national and political rhetoric? What has it meant to identify as transgender or transsexual? This course explores religious, ethnic, and sexual minority groups in Iran in the twentieth century. Topics include minority rights, identity formation, minorities¿ involvement in political movements, the impact of westernizing efforts on minorities, and the Iranian diaspora. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Farah, D. (PI)

JEWISHST 85B: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Visibility and Vulnerability (CSRE 85B, HISTORY 85B, REES 85B)

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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