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11 - 20 of 35 results for: JEWISHST ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

JEWISHST 104C: Beginning Yiddish, Third Quarter (AMELANG 140C)

Reading, writing, and speaking.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Language | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Levitow, J. (PI)

JEWISHST 106: Reflection on the Other: The Jew in Arabic Literature, the Arab in Hebrew Literature (AMELANG 126)

How literary works outside the realm of western culture struggle with questions such as identity, minority, and the issue of the other. How the Arab is viewed in Hebrew literature and how the Jew is viewed in Arabic literature. Historical, political, and sociological forces that have contributed to the shaping of the writer's views. Arab and Jewish (Israeli) culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

JEWISHST 107A: Biblical Hebrew, First Quarter (AMELANG 170A, RELIGST 170A)

Establish a basic familiarity with the grammar and vocabulary of Biblical Hebrew and will begin developing a facility with the language. This course requires no prior knowledge of Hebrew and will begin with learning the alphabet. By the end of the quarter, students will be able to translate basic biblical texts, will be familiar with common lexica and reference grammars, and will have sufficient foundational knowledge to enable them to continue expanding their knowledge either in a subsequent course or own their own.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JEWISHST 148: Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature (JEWISHST 248, SLAVLIT 198, SLAVLIT 298)

Eastern European Jews spoke and read Hebrew, Yiddish, and their co-territorial languages (Russian, Polish, etc.). In the modern period they developed secular literatures in all of them, and their writing reflected their own multilinguality and evolving language ideologies. We focus on major literary and sociolinguistic texts. Reading and discussion in English; students should have some reading knowledge of at least one relevant language as well.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Safran, G. (PI)

JEWISHST 15A: The Bible and Archaeology (CLASSGEN 15, RELIGST 15A)

An introduction to how archaeology has been used to illumine the Bible and biblical history. Did Abraham exist? Was there an Exodus? Did Joshua really conquer Canaan? What does archaeology reveal about ancient Israel beyond what is recorded in the Bible? This course will address such questions as it seeks to introduce biblical archaeology to students with no prior introduction to either the Bible or to archaeology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shectman, S. (PI)

JEWISHST 15N: Travels through the Afterlife (RELIGST 15N)

Since the beginning of civilization, humans have refused to believe that physical death is the end of life and have sought in various ways to travel into the afterlife. We cannot know what lies beyond death, but there are other kinds of insights to be learned from these otherworldly journeys. The first part of the course will explore the origins and history of the afterlife, going back in time to ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Israel, Greece, and medieval Europe to survey these cultures' view of death and what lies beyond it. The second part of the course will investigate what has happened to belief in the afterlife in modern American culture. Our ultimate goal is to confront one of the most difficult aspects of life--our fear of death and oblivion--and also to explore the power of thought and imagination to move beyond the confines of mortality.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Weitzman, S. (PI)

JEWISHST 183: The Holocaust (HISTORY 237, HISTORY 337, JEWISHST 383)

The emergence of modern racism and radical anti-Semitism. The Nazi rise to power and the Jews. Anti-Semitic legislation in the 30s. WW II and the beginning of mass killings in the East. Deportations and ghettos. The mass extermination of European Jewry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JEWISHST 185B: Jews in the Modern World (HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C)

(Same as HISTORY 85B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) Topics include the restructuring of Jewish existence during the Enlightenment and legal emancipation at the end of the 18th century in W. Europe; the transformation of Jewish life in E. Europe under the authoritarian Russian regime; colonialism in the Sephardic world; new ideologies (Reform Judaism and Jewish nationalisms); the persistence and renewal of antisemitism; the destruction of European Jewry under the Nazis; new Jewish centers in the U.S.; and the State of Israel.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JEWISHST 248: Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature (JEWISHST 148, SLAVLIT 198, SLAVLIT 298)

Eastern European Jews spoke and read Hebrew, Yiddish, and their co-territorial languages (Russian, Polish, etc.). In the modern period they developed secular literatures in all of them, and their writing reflected their own multilinguality and evolving language ideologies. We focus on major literary and sociolinguistic texts. Reading and discussion in English; students should have some reading knowledge of at least one relevant language as well.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Safran, G. (PI)

JEWISHST 289: Poles and Jews (HISTORY 229, HISTORY 329, JEWISHST 389)

Focus is on the period since WW I. The place of the Jews in interwar Poland, WW II, surviving Jews after the war, Polish memorialization of the Holocaust, the reality and mythology of Jews in the communist apparatus, the manipulation of anti-Semitism by the communist government, and post-communist movement toward reconciliation. Memory and national mythology emphasizing Polish wartime behavior and the relationship of Jews to communism. The sources and uses of stereotypes, and the state of Polish-Jewish relations today.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)
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