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1 - 10 of 12 results for: JEWISHST ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

JEWISHST 86S: Zionism Considered: Jewish Thinkers and the Quest for a Jewish Home (HISTORY 86S)

This course examines how Jews have approached Zionism from the mid-nineteenth century until the present day. Focusing on understanding the major divisions within Zionism, a particular emphasis will be on leaders of the various factions, exploring why they believed a Jewish home to be necessary and how such a home was envisioned. Readings will include propaganda, literature, and images, and assignments include short responses, presentations, and a research paper. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Meyers, J. (PI)

JEWISHST 101A: First-Year Hebrew, First Quarter (AMELANG 128A)

Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Elbaz, E. (PI)

JEWISHST 102A: Second-Year Hebrew, First Quarter (AMELANG 129A)

Continuation of AMELANG 128C. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 128C.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Language
Instructors: Porat, G. (PI)

JEWISHST 104A: First-Year Yiddish, First Quarter (AMELANG 140A)

Reading, writing, and speaking.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Levitow, J. (PI)

JEWISHST 106: Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature (AMELANG 126, COMPLIT 145)

How literary works outside the realm of Western culture struggle with questions such as identity, minority, and the issue of the Other. How the Arab is viewed in Hebrew literature, film and music and how the Jew is viewed in Palestinian works in Hebrew or Arabic (in translation to English). Historical, political, and sociological forces that have contributed to the shaping of these writers' views.nnGuest lectures about the Jew in Palestinian literature and music.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

JEWISHST 107A: Biblical Hebrew, First Quarter (AMELANG 170A, RELIGST 170A)

Establish a basic familiarity with the grammar and vocabulary of Biblical Hebrew and will begin developing a facility with the language. Students that are enrolled in this course must also enroll in Beginning Hebrew. This course requires no prior knowledge of Hebrew and will begin with learning the alphabet. By the end of the year, students will be able to translate basic biblical texts, will be familiar with common lexica and reference grammars, and will have sufficient foundational knowledge to enable them to continue expanding their knowledge either in a subsequent course or own their own.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Porat, G. (PI)

JEWISHST 127D: Readings in Talmudic Literature (JEWISHST 227D, RELIGST 170D)

Readings of the talmudic texts. Some knowledge of Hebrew is preferred. The ongoing seminar is designed to study the making of the talmudic sugya (unit of discourse), along with classic commentaries. Students will consider some of the recent developments in the academic study of Talmudic literature, introduced by the instructor. The goal of the ongoing seminar is to provide Stanford students and faculty with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts. Class meets on Fridays, from 12:00-1:15 pm in Hillel (Koret Pavilion Taube Hillel House; Ziff Center for Jewish Life). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

JEWISHST 132: Between Nation-Building and Liberalization: The Welfare State in Israel (SOC 102)

According to one commentator, the political economy of Israel is characterized by embedded illiberalism. In the context of a national and territorial conflict, the Israeli state fostered comprehensive nation-building projects (such as immigration absorption), via employment and social protection schemes. This course surveys the distinctive development of the Israeli welfare state in comparative perspective, and analyzes its particular politics and outcomes in the form of inclusion but also exclusion of different populations from full citizenship. The course will follow a chronological path from the pre-state crystallization of national welfare institutions to the current neo-liberalization trend that seems to undermine collectivist projects and advance the re-commodification of citizenship. Throughout the course we will discuss issues such as: the role of labor and nationalism in the design of social policy, the production of national, ethnic and gender inequality, and the dynamics of change and continuity following heightened liberalization and internationalization since the 1980s. The course exposes students to key issues of the sociology of the welfare state with particular emphasis on the development and role of the state in a deeply conflicted society, using the Israeli experience. At the conclusion of the course students are expected to understand how welfare state institutions reflect but also reproduce societal schisms and conflicts, and be familiar with central aspects of Israeli politics past and present.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Maron, A. (PI)

JEWISHST 227D: Readings in Talmudic Literature (JEWISHST 127D, RELIGST 170D)

Readings of the talmudic texts. Some knowledge of Hebrew is preferred. The ongoing seminar is designed to study the making of the talmudic sugya (unit of discourse), along with classic commentaries. Students will consider some of the recent developments in the academic study of Talmudic literature, introduced by the instructor. The goal of the ongoing seminar is to provide Stanford students and faculty with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts. Class meets on Fridays, from 12:00-1:15 pm in Hillel (Koret Pavilion Taube Hillel House; Ziff Center for Jewish Life). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

JEWISHST 237: Religion and Politics: A Threat to Democracy? (IPS 237)

The meddling of religion in politics has become a major global issue. Can religion co-exist with politics in a democracy? In Israel this is an acute issue exhibiting an existential question: To what extent religion is a source of the weaknesses and vulnerabilities of Israeli Democracy? This seminar is meant to be a research workshop, part of a policy-oriented applied research in motion, aimed at developing detailed strategies for alleviating the tensions and conflicts that stem from the role of religion in politics in Israel. The proposed research seminar will be directed toward constructing both the infrastructure and framework for the comparative dimension of the programmatic study. The seminar will include unique opportunities for hands-on, team-based research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Carmon, A. (PI)
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