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31 - 40 of 93 results for: JEWISHST

JEWISHST 107C: Biblical Hebrew, Third Quarter (AMELANG 170C)

Continuation of 170B.
Last offered: Spring 2016

JEWISHST 120: Sex and Gender in Judaism and Christianity (FEMGEN 130, RELIGST 130)

What role do Jewish and Christian traditions play in shaping understandings of gender differences? Is gender always imagined as dual, male and female? This course explores the variety of ways in which Jewish and Christian traditions - often in conversation with and against each other - have shaped gender identities and sexual politics. We will explore the central role that issues around marriage and reproduction played in this conversation. Perhaps surprisingly, early Jews and Christian also espoused deep interest in writing about 'eunuchs' and 'androgynes,' as they thought about Jewish and Christian ways of being a man or a woman. We will examine the variety of these early conversations, and the contemporary Jewish and Christian discussions of feminist, queer, trans- and intersex based on them.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED

JEWISHST 127D: Readings in Talmudic Literature (JEWISHST 227D, RELIGST 170D)

Readings of the talmudic texts. Some knowledge of Hebrew is preferred. The ongoing seminar is designed to study the making of the talmudic sugya (unit of discourse), along with classic commentaries. Students will consider some of the recent developments in the academic study of Talmudic literature, introduced by the instructor. The goal of the ongoing seminar is to provide Stanford students and faculty with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts. Class meets on Fridays, from 12:00-1:15 pm in Hillel (Koret Pavilion Taube Hillel House; Ziff Center for Jewish Life). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

JEWISHST 127E: Readings in Talmudic Literature Advanced (JEWISHST 227E, RELIGST 170E)

Readings of the talmudic texts. Knowledge of Hebrew is required. The ongoing seminar is designed to study the making of the talmudic sugya (unit of discourse), along with classic commentaries. Students will consider some of the recent developments in the academic study of Talmudic literature, introduced by the instructor. The goal of the ongoing seminar is to provide Stanford students and faculty with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts. Meeting time and location TBA. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

JEWISHST 130: Illicit Trade in Art and Antiquities (GLOBAL 190, GLOBAL 390, JEWISHST 330, PUBLPOL 191, PUBLPOL 391)

Illicit trade in art and antiquities is reputedly the third largest illicit trade activity globally. How do nations, individually and collectively, respond to this seemingly inexorable form of illicit trade, and what factors influence those responses? What are the sources and effects of such trade, and how can it best be curbed? This course will delve into these and other pressing political, legal, ethical, economic, cultural and public policy questions about illicit art and antiquities trade, arising across five subject areas: (1) the acquisition of art during the Age of Imperialism (ie, from Roman times through World War II); (2) Holocaust-era takings and the evolution in international legal and ethical responses to wartime looting; (3) removal and repatriation of Indigenous cultural material; (4) theft from museums and private collectors, and legal systems¿ varying allocation of the risk of such theft; and (5) the illicit trade and destruction of antiquities, and issues surrounding their restitution. Several internationally renowned guest speakers will give presentations and contribute to our discussions. Grading will be based on attendance, participation in class and an online discussion forum, a student group presentation, and a final exam or research paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI

JEWISHST 132: Between Nation-Building and Liberalization: The Welfare State in Israel (SOC 102)

According to one commentator, the political economy of Israel is characterized by embedded illiberalism. In the context of a national and territorial conflict, the Israeli state fostered comprehensive nation-building projects (such as immigration absorption), via employment and social protection schemes. This course surveys the distinctive development of the Israeli welfare state in comparative perspective, and analyzes its particular politics and outcomes in the form of inclusion but also exclusion of different populations from full citizenship. The course will follow a chronological path from the pre-state crystallization of national welfare institutions to the current neo-liberalization trend that seems to undermine collectivist projects and advance the re-commodification of citizenship. Throughout the course we will discuss issues such as: the role of labor and nationalism in the design of social policy, the production of national, ethnic and gender inequality, and the dynamics of change and continuity following heightened liberalization and internationalization since the 1980s. The course exposes students to key issues of the sociology of the welfare state with particular emphasis on the development and role of the state in a deeply conflicted society, using the Israeli experience. At the conclusion of the course students are expected to understand how welfare state institutions reflect but also reproduce societal schisms and conflicts, and be familiar with central aspects of Israeli politics past and present.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

JEWISHST 132D: Sociology of Jewishness (CSRE 132J, SOC 132J)

Examines the place of the Jewish people in society throughout various locales and historical periods to understand how interactions among Jews and with other groups have shaped Jewish identities. Topics include modernism, the Holocaust, Israel/nationhood, race/ethnicity, intermarriage, and assimilation. Uses theoretical, empirical, and historical material from multiple social scientific fields of study and explores the study of Judaism from several major sociological lenses.
Last offered: Spring 2015

JEWISHST 133: Sociology of Citizenship (SOC 103)

Not only a legal status, citizenship forms a major concern for political sociologists interested in questions of membership, exclusion, redistribution, and struggles over the boundaries of collective identity. Citizenship is in essence membership in a political community that entails rights and duties, and structures a tripartite relationship between the individual, community and state. The institutions of citizenship include formal and bureaucratic rules of eligibility ¿ but also informal institutions such as identity and belonging. Throughout the course, students are exposed to key issues of the sociology of citizenship such as the historically different paths of men, women, minority groups and immigrants into citizenship, the contested development of rights and duties, the regulation of population, as well as insurgency and collective attempts to rearticulate the terms of the ¿contract¿ with the state. Israel, the USA, France and Germany are used as empirical illustrations. At the conclusion of the course students will know how to utilize the analytic framework of citizenship in order to analyze a wide range of political phenomena in contemporary societies.
Last offered: Winter 2016

JEWISHST 138A: Germany and the World Wars, 1870-1990 (HISTORY 138A)

(Same as HISTORY 38A. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 138A.) This course examines Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. During this time, Germany ushered in five regimes and two world wars, seesawing between material ruin and economic prosperity on the frontline of Europe¿s military and ideological rifts. Beginning with Bismarck¿s wars of unification, the class spans World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Sheffer, E. (PI)

JEWISHST 139: Rereading Judaism in Light of Feminism (FEMGEN 139)

During the past three decades, Jewish feminists have asked new questions of traditional rabbinic texts, Jewish law, history, and religious life and thought. Analysis of the legal and narrative texts, rituals, theology, and community to better understand contemporary Jewish life as influenced by feminism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED
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