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51 - 60 of 99 results for: JAPAN

JAPAN 221: Translating Japan, Translating the West (COMPLIT 142B, JAPAN 121)

Translation lies at the heart of all intercultural exchange. This course introduces students to the specific ways in which translation has shaped the image of Japan in the West, the image of the West in Japan, and Japan's self-image in the modern period. What texts and concepts were translated by each side, how, and to what effect? No prior knowledge of Japanese language necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

JAPAN 222: Translating Cool: Globalized Popular Culture in Asia (JAPAN 122, KOREA 122, KOREA 222)

Did you grow up watching Pokémon and Power Rangers? Have you danced along to "Gangnam Style"? As we become increasingly exposed to Asian popular culture and the Internet facilitates instant access to new media, previous localized forms of entertainment--animated cartoons, comics, video games, music videos, film, and soap operas--have become part of a global staple. However, these cultural forms have emerged not only in their original form with mediation of subtitles. Many have undergone various processes of adaptation and translation so that we no longer recognize that these products had ever originated elsewhere. This course will immerse students in a range of Japanese and Korean cultural phenomena to reveal the spectrum of translation practices across national boundaries. We will inquire into why these cultural forms have such compelling and powerful staying power, contextualize them within their frames of production, and explore the strategies, limitations, and potential of translational practices.nnContact instructor for place. dafnazur@stanford.edunKnight 201.
Last offered: Winter 2017

JAPAN 223: Critical Translation Studies (COMPLIT 228, JAPAN 123)

Seminal works of translation theory and scholarship from a wide array of disciplinary, regional, linguistic, and historical perspectives. Readings are in English, but students must have at least two years of training or the equivalent in another language, or permission from the instructor. (Important note: Students who wish to count this course toward requirements in the department of East Asian Languages and Cultures must have permission from their EALC advisor.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Levy, I. (PI)

JAPAN 224: Manga as Literature (JAPAN 124)

Analysis of representative manga as narratives that combine verbal and visual elements, with attention to historical and cultural background. Representative manga by Tezuka Osamu, Tatsumi Yoshihiro, Koike Kazuo, Taniguchi Jiro, Natsume Ono, Kono Fumiyo, and others. All readings in English.nnnClass meets in Knight Bldg, Rm 018. Contact instructor (sdcarter@stanford.edu) for place

JAPAN 233: Japanese Media Culture (JAPAN 133)

Focuses on the intertwined histories of the postwar Japanese television, anime, music, and video game industries, and how their development intersects with wider trends in Japanese society. We will pay particular attention to questions of affect, labor, and environment in media production, consumption, and style.

JAPAN 235: Academic Readings in Japanese I

Strategies for reading academic writings in Japanese. Readings of scholarly papers and advanced materials in Japanese in students' research areas in the humanities and social sciences. Prerequisites: JAPANLNG 103, 129B, or equivalent; and consent of instructor. May be repeat for credit.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Repeatable for credit

JAPAN 238: Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture (JAPAN 138)

This class introduces key literary texts from Japan's modern era (1868-present), locating these works in the larger political, social, and cultural trends of the period. Primary texts include: Futabatei Shimei's Floating Clouds, Higuchi Ichiyô's Child's Play, Natsume Sôseki's Kokoro, Kobayashi Takiji's Cannery Boat, Ôe Kenzaburô's The Catch, and Yoshimoto Banana's Kitchen. Examination of these literary works will be contextualized within larger political trends (e.g., the modernization program of the Meiji regime, the policies of Japan's wartime government, and postwar Japanese responses to the cold war), social developments (e.g., changing notions of social class, the women's rights movement, and the social effects of the postwar economic expansion), and cultural movements (e.g., literary reform movement of the 1890s, modernism of the 1920s and 30s, and postmodernism of the 1980s). The goal of the class is to use literary texts as a point of entry to understand the grand narrative of Japan's journey from its tentative re-entry into the international community in the 1850s, through the cataclysm of the Pacific War, to the remarkable prosperity of the bubble years in the 1980s.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

JAPAN 239: Modern Japanese Short Stories

This course explores the postwar Japanese short story. We will read representative works by major authors, such as Ishikawa Jun, Hayashi Fumiko, Abe Kobe and Murakami Haruki. Attention will be devoted to both accurate reading of the Japanese prose and more general discussion of the literary features of the texts.
| Repeatable for credit

JAPAN 244: Inventing Japan: Traditional Culture in the Modern World (JAPAN 144)

Features of traditional Japanese culture such as temples and shrines, kimono, and cultural practices like the tea ceremony, have played an important role in both domestic and international representations of Japan since the late nineteenth century. In this course students will be introduced to these elements of traditional Japanese culture, while learning to cast a critical eye on the concept of tradition. Themes will include discussion of the gendered nature of tradition in modern Japan and the role played by such traditions in constructing national identity, both in Japan and overseas. We will explore these topics using the theoretical frameworks of invention of tradition and reformatting of tradition. Contact instructor for room. rcorbett@stanford.edu

JAPAN 248: Modern Japanese Narratives: Literature and Film (JAPAN 148)

Central issues in modern Japanese visual and written narrative. Focus is on competing views of modernity, war, and crises of individual and collective identity and responsibility. Directors and authors include Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, Ozu, Ogai, Akutagawa, Tanizaki, Abe, and Oe.
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