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31 - 40 of 104 results for: JAPAN

JAPAN 162: Japanese Poetry and Poetics (JAPAN 262)

Heian through Meiji periods with emphasis on relationships between the social and aesthetic. Works vary each year. This year's genre is the diary. Prerequisites: 246, 247, or equivalent.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | Repeatable for credit

JAPAN 163: Japanese Performance Traditions (JAPAN 263)

Major paradigms of gender in Japanese performance traditions from ancient to modern times, covering Noh, Kabuki, Bunraku, and Takarazuka.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

JAPAN 164: Introduction to Premodern Japanese (JAPAN 264)

Readings from Heian, Kamakura, Muromachi, and early Edo periods with focus on grammar and reading comprehension. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 129B or 103, or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

JAPAN 166: Introduction to Sino-Japanese (JAPAN 266)

Readings in Sino-Japanese ( kambun) texts of the Heian, Kamakura, and Muromachi periods, with focus on grammar and reading comprehension. Prerequisite: 246 or equivalent.

JAPAN 170: The Tale of Genji and Its Historical Reception (JAPAN 270)

Approaches to the tale including 12th-century allegorical and modern feminist readings. Influence upon other works including poetry, Noh plays, short stories, modern novels, and comic book ( manga) retellings. Prerequisite for graduate students: JAPANLNG 129B or 103, or equivalent.nnThis course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

JAPAN 184: Aristocrats, Warriors, Sex Workers, and Barbarians: Lived Life in Early Modern Japanese Painting (ARTHIST 184, ARTHIST 384, JAPAN 284)

Changes marking the transition from medieval to early modern Japanese society that generated a revolution in visual culture, as exemplified in subjects deemed fit for representation; how commoners joined elites in pictorializing their world, catalyzed by interactions with the Dutch.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

JAPAN 185: Arts of War and Peace: Late Medieval and Early Modern Japan, 1500-1868 (ARTHIST 187, ARTHIST 387, JAPAN 285)

Narratives of conflict, pacification, orthodoxy, nostalgia, and novelty through visual culture during the change of episteme from late medieval to early modern, 16th through early 19th centuries. The rhetorical messages of castles, teahouses, gardens, ceramics, paintings, and prints; the influence of Dutch and Chinese visuality; transformation in the roles of art and artist; tensions between the old and the new leading to the modernization of Japan.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom

JAPAN 186: Theme and Style in Japanese Art (ARTHIST 186, ARTHIST 386, JAPAN 286)

A mixture of lecture and discussion, this course presents a chronological introduction to some of the defining monuments in the history of Japanese visual culture from prehistory to the mid-19th century. This introductory class presumes no prior knowledge of art history or of Japan. We will emphasize certain overarching themes like religious life; notions of decorum appropriate to various classes (court, warrior, and commoner); the relationship between and among the arts, such as the visual and the verbal, or the symphonic assemblage arts as seen in the tea ceremony; pervasive cultural tropes like nostalgia, seasonality, or the sense of place; and broader issues such as censorship, patronage, gender issues, and the encounters between Japanese and foreign cultures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Takeuchi, M. (PI)

JAPAN 188: The Japanese Tea Ceremony: The History, Aesthetics, and Politics Behind a National Pastime (ARTHIST 287A, JAPAN 288)

The Japanese tea ceremony, the ultimate premodern multimedia phenomenon, integrates architecture, garden design, ceramics, painting, calligraphy, and other treasured objects into a choreographed ritual wherein host, objects, and guests perform designated roles on a tiny stage sometimes only six feet square.. In addition to its much-touted aesthetic and philosophical aspects, the practice of tea includes inevitable political and rhetorical dimensions. This course traces the evolution of tea practice from its inception within the milieu of courtier diversions, Zen monasteries, and warrior villas, through its various permutations into the 20th century, where it was manipulated by the emerging industrialist class for different-but ultimately similar-ends.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

JAPAN 189B: Honors Research

Open to senior honors students to write thesis.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
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