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21 - 30 of 99 results for: JAPAN

JAPAN 152: Art Animation (FILMSTUD 146, JAPAN 252)

While anime has spread around the world, Japanese art animators have been busy developing a parallel tradition, built from a more personal, experimental, and idiosyncratic approach to the medium. Looking closely at key works from major artists in the field, this course explores art animation from a variety of perspectives: animation scene; philosophical attempts to account for animated movement; and art animation's unique perspective on Japanese culture.

JAPAN 155: The Vampire in Anime (JAPAN 255)

Analysis of anime where vampires play central roles as characters and/or in plot development. Comparison of character and plot development within anime series and Western vampire literature will be the main focus; attention will also be paid to the development of the vampire as a literary and film character in the West, the conception of the supernatural in Japanese culture, and the points of similarity and difference between the two.
Last offered: Winter 2017

JAPAN 157: Science, Power, and Knowledge: East Asia to 1900 (CHINA 157, CHINA 257, HISTORY 294J, JAPAN 257, KOREA 157, KOREA 257)

In the early modern period, East Asian societies featured long-established institutions of learning and traditions of knowledge. This course examines the relationship between knowledge and power in East Asia societies prior to 1900. It explores how knowledge production operated in late imperial China (1550-1900), Chos'n Korea (1392-1910), and Tokugawa Japan (1600-1868). Among the themes addressed are: the state's role in patronizing science and knowledge; major intellectual movements; engagement with Western science and religion; East Asian statecraft; and East Asian understandings of space and geography. nTaking a holistic perspective, it places science and technology in 1) a social and cultural context 2) in relation to other bodies and fields of knowledge 3) in comparison to other societies in a similar historical time period. A socially embedded perspective on knowledge and science seeks to appreciate how politics, society, and knowledge are integrated, and in particular how scienc more »
In the early modern period, East Asian societies featured long-established institutions of learning and traditions of knowledge. This course examines the relationship between knowledge and power in East Asia societies prior to 1900. It explores how knowledge production operated in late imperial China (1550-1900), Chos'n Korea (1392-1910), and Tokugawa Japan (1600-1868). Among the themes addressed are: the state's role in patronizing science and knowledge; major intellectual movements; engagement with Western science and religion; East Asian statecraft; and East Asian understandings of space and geography. nTaking a holistic perspective, it places science and technology in 1) a social and cultural context 2) in relation to other bodies and fields of knowledge 3) in comparison to other societies in a similar historical time period. A socially embedded perspective on knowledge and science seeks to appreciate how politics, society, and knowledge are integrated, and in particular how science and knowledge can be both instruments and sites of political power. By exploring these links, the course will also illustrate how our modern disciplinary categories of natural science,social science and the humanities cannot be taken for granted and the areas of knowledge they cover can be deeply intertwined. nnThe course will also address these issues historically and across geographic regions in East Asia and beyond. The comparative lens and frameworks these perspectives can offer will bring an awareness of the diverse traditions of knowledge production in East Asia. Its examination of East Asian encounters with Western paradigms of knowledge throughout the early modern period will also illustrate how communication occurs across cultural, social, and linguistic barriers and how diverse world-views were managed in these encounters. These encounters of knowledge-exchange between Jesuit missionaries, Ming literati, Korean aristocrats, and Japanese doctors also show how cultural identities were constructed, reinforced, and challenged. These identities, expressed through the mastery of knowledge, are essential for understanding how East Asian reckoned with growing pressures to adopt Western industrial technology and military science in the late nineteenth century.

JAPAN 157S: Tyranny and Resistance: East Asia's Political Culture and Tradition (CHINA 157S, KOREA 157S)

What is tyranny? When does political power cease to be legitimate and government become tyrannical? And what can individuals do in the face of tyranny? This course will explore East Asia's long political tradition through the problem of tyranny and its resistance. We will cover a wide range of material. We begin with how seminal political thinkers in East Asia, including Warring States philosophers such as Mencius and Han Feizi, understood the boundary between legitimate and illegitimate authority. We will also look at the strategies used by various political actors, including government officials, cultural or social elites, and common people, when they confronted what they perceived to be the unjust exercise political power, whether in the form of despotic monarchs, corrupt authorities, or general misrule. Our discussions will be wide-ranging. We will pay particular attention to how these historical examples from China, Korea, and Japan¿s past have resonated with modern and contemporary political discussions in contemporary East Asian societies.
Last offered: Summer 2019

JAPAN 158: A Critical and Historical Survey of Classical Japanese Literature (JAPAN 258)

This course presents a broad survey of classical Japanese literature in English translation, with particular emphasis on prose fiction and poetry. We will make use of multiple, complementary modes of literary criticism, beginning with historicism and formalism, which reflect different assumptions and interpretive priorities. The approach is integrative, with attention paid throughout to the intersections between literature, social and institutional history, and religion. Key questions to be explored include the following: How were the major works of classical Japanese literature understood by readers during the medieval and early-modern periods? How did the current canon of classical Japanese literature arise, and what historical forces shaped its development? How might modern modes of literary criticism help us better approach premodern Japanese literature, and what are their limitations?
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Reichert, J. (PI)

JAPAN 159: The Paranormal in Premodern Japan (JAPAN 259)

This course will explore the various stories of gods, ghosts, demons, and monsters that appear throughout the Premodern period in Japan. The course will use the concept of the paranormal to explore the ways these beings are depicted as living alongside humanity and that humanity can easily and unknowingly enter into the realm of these beings.
Last offered: Winter 2018

JAPAN 160: Classical Japanese Literature in Translation (JAPAN 260)

Prose, poetry, and drama from the 10th-19th centuries. Historical, intellectual, and cultural context. Works vary each year. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

JAPAN 161: Japanese Ghosts: The Supernatural in Japanese Art and Entertainment (JAPAN 261)

The complex meanings of ghosts in Japanese culture. Representations of the supernatural in images, drama, oral narratives, prose, film, comics and animation at different moments in Japanese history.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom

JAPAN 162: Japanese Poetry and Poetics (JAPAN 262)

Heian through Meiji periods with emphasis on relationships between the social and aesthetic. Works vary each year. This year's genre is the diary. Prerequisites: 246, 247, or equivalent.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | Repeatable for credit

JAPAN 163: Japanese Performance Traditions (JAPAN 263)

Major paradigms of gender in Japanese performance traditions from ancient to modern times, covering Noh, Kabuki, Bunraku, and Takarazuka.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
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