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21 - 30 of 58 results for: ITALIAN

ITALIAN 215: Italian Film, Fashion, and Design, 1950-1968 (ITALIAN 315)

In a close analysis of films by Fellini, Antonioni, Rossellini, Pasolini, and Bertolucci, we will explore the various contradictions that fueled the Italian cultural imagination in the 50s and 60s: minimalism and multiplicity, male and female, industrial and archaic, comic and tragic, wealth and poverty. Special emphasis placed on fashion, design, and modernist art. Taught in English, with the option of an additional discussion section in Italian. Occasional screenings Monday evenings at 7pm.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 220: Early Modern Seminar (DLCL 323)

Explores some of the key texts of European early modernity and the critical paradigms according to which the idea of the "Renaissance" has been formed, analyzed, and questioned since the 19th century. Will aim to provide a broad introduction to Early Modern studies from the point of view of the Italian Renaissance and its reception in different European contexts. Taught in English.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ITALIAN 221: Italo Calvino: Literature, Science, Philosophy

The course will follow the development of Italo Calvino's literary career, with a particular focus on his interest in fantastical and meta-fictional forms of narrative. Readings of Calvino's literary works, such as Cosmicomics, Invisible Cities, and Mr. Palomar, will be supplemented by readings from his critical prose, collected in the volumes The Uses of Literature and Six Memos for the Next Millennium. Taught in English.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 224: Leopardi, Baudelaire, and Modernity (FRENCH 224, FRENCH 324, ITALIAN 324)

A close reading of Giacomo Leopardi's Canti and Charles Baudelaire's Flowers of Evil and Paris Spleen in the context of 19th-century Europe. Discussion of the poetry will be enriched by selections from their essays on literature and art and by notes from the Zibaldone and Mon coeur mis à nu. Key themes and concepts include language, imagination, "noia," "spleen," and the oppositions between nature and civilization, modernity and antiquity. Taught in English.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ITALIAN 225: Petrarch & Petrarchism: Fragments of the Self (COMPLIT 225E, COMPLIT 325E, ITALIAN 325)

In this course we will examine Francis Petrarch's book of Italian lyric poems, Rerum vulgarium fragmenta, and its reception in early modern France, England, and Spain. Readings from Petrarch's epistolary and ethical writings will contextualize historically and intellectually the aesthetics and ethics of the fragment in his poetry. With this foundation, we will investigate the long-lasting impact of Petrarch¿s work on Renaissance poetry and humanism, with attention to both the literary and the material aspects of its reception. Taught in English.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 226: Modern Italian Poetry and Ultimate Questions

More than in any other tradition, Italian poets of the twentieth century focus on "ultimate questions," and look all the way back to Dante in doing so: why do we die? is there a God? what does it mean to love? are we responsible for our neighbors? is beauty related to truth? what do we learn from the past? what makes life meaningful? Poets include Ungaretti, Montale, Caproni, Sereni, Rosselli, Pasolini, Luzi, Merini, and Zanzotto. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: Second-year Italian minimum
Last offered: Autumn 2012

ITALIAN 227: Giambattista Vico & Claude Lévi-Strauss (FRENCH 230, FRENCH 330, ITALIAN 327)

An intensive reading of Vico's New Science with special emphasis on Vico's theory of anthropogenesis, myth, and the poetic origins of human consciousness. Vico's thought will be placed in relation to Lévi-Strauss's theories of myth and so-called "primitive thought". Readings include Vico's New Science and Lévi-Strauss's "The Structural Study of Myth", and the first chapters of his book The Savage Mind. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Harrison, R. (PI)

ITALIAN 228: Science, technology and society and the humanities in the face of the looming disaster (FRENCH 228, POLISCI 233F)

How STS and the Humanities can together help think out the looming catastrophes that put the future of humankind in jeopardy.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Dupuy, J. (PI)

ITALIAN 232B: Heretics, Prostitutes and Merchants: The Venetian Empire (HISTORY 232B)

Between 1200-1600, Venice created a powerful empire at the boundary between East and West that controlled much of the Mediterranean, with a merchant society that allowed social groups, religions, and ethnicities to coexist. Topics include the features of Venetian society, the relationship between center and periphery, order and disorder, orthodoxy and heresy, the role of politics, art, and culture in the Venetian Renaissance, and the empire's decline as a political power and reinvention as a tourist site and living museum.
Last offered: Winter 2015

ITALIAN 234: Courtly Love: Deceit and Desire in the Middle Ages (COMPLIT 221A, FRENCH 234)

A comparative seminar on medieval love books and their reception. We will examine and question the notion of "amour courtois," which arose in the lyrics and romances of medieval France and was codified in Romantic-era criticism. Primary readings will be enriched by thinking about this notion through the lens of modern theories of desire, such as those of Girard, Lacan, and Zizek. Conducted in English with readings in translation.
Last offered: Winter 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
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