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11 - 20 of 46 results for: ITALIAN

ITALIAN 154: Film & Philosophy (ENGLISH 154F, FRENCH 154, PHIL 193C, PHIL 293C)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 154E: Film & Philosophy CE (FRENCH 154E, PHIL 193E, PHIL 293E)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English. Satisfies the WAY CE.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ITALIAN 155: The Mafia in Society, Film, and Fiction (COMPLIT 155A)

The mafia has become a global problem through its infiltration of international business, and its model of organized crime has spread all over the world from its origins in Sicily. At the same time, film and fiction remain fascinated by a romantic, heroic vision of the mafia. Compares both Italian and American fantasies of the Mafia to its history and impact on Italian and global culture. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

ITALIAN 175: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to major capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ITALIAN 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ILAC 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 199: Individual Work

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

ITALIAN 200: Italian Modernities: Lecture Series and Course (ITALIAN 300)

Over the course of the whole year, we will invite 6 speakers to present work on modern Italian culture and literature; these sessions will be supplemented by seminar meetings in which we discuss the work of our guests and prepare writing projects that relate to them. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

ITALIAN 216: Michelangelo Architect (ARTHIST 416A, CEE 33A)

The architecture of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564), "Father and Master of all the Arts," redefined the possibilities of architectural expression for generations. This course considers his civic, ecclesiastic, and palatial works. It proceeds from his beginnings in Medicean Florence to his fulfillment in Papal Rome. It examines the anxiety of influence following his death and his enduring legacy in modernism. Topics include: Michelangelo's debt to Classical and Early Renaissance prototypes; his transformation of the canon; the iterative sketch as disegno; architecture and the body; the queering of architectural language; sketch, scale, and materiality; Modernism and Michelangelo. The historiography of Michelangelo has predominantly favored studies in painting and sculpture. Our focus on architecture encourages students to test new ideas and alternative approaches to his work.
Last offered: Winter 2017

ITALIAN 228: Science, technology and society and the humanities in the face of the looming disaster (FRENCH 228, POLISCI 233F)

How STS and the Humanities can together help think out the looming catastrophes that put the future of humankind in jeopardy.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

ITALIAN 232B: Heretics, Prostitutes and Merchants: The Venetian Empire (HISTORY 232B)

Between 1200-1600, Venice created a powerful empire at the boundary between East and West that controlled much of the Mediterranean, with a merchant society that allowed social groups, religions, and ethnicities to coexist. Topics include the features of Venetian society, the relationship between center and periphery, order and disorder, orthodoxy and heresy, the role of politics, art, and culture in the Venetian Renaissance, and the empire's decline as a political power and reinvention as a tourist site and living museum.
Last offered: Winter 2015
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