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1 - 8 of 8 results for: IPS

IPS 211: The Transition from War to Peace: Peacebuilding Strategies

How to find sustainable solutions to intractable internal conflicts that lead to peace settlements. How institutions such as the UN, regional organizations, and international financial agencies attempt to support a peace process. Case studies include Bosnia, East Timor, Kosovo, Burundi, Liberia, and Afghanistan. In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 236: The Politics of Private Sector Development

This is a case-based course on how to achieve public policy reform with the aim of promoting private sector development in developing countries. It will deal with issues like privatization, reducing informality, infrastructure development, trade promotion, and combatting corruption
Terms: given next year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 238: Overcoming Practical Obstacles to Policy Implementation

Many of the obstacles to effective governance lie less in the proper formulation of public policies than in their implementation. Modern government is complex, multilayered, and often highly politicized. This course will focus on problems of implementation based on the practical experiences of policy practitioners. This will be a team-taught course utilizing faculty from across the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), and will encompass diverse policy areas including national security, foreign policy, crime, health, food safety, and environment.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 247: Organized Crime and Democracy in Latin America (INTNLREL 152)

Scholars and policy analysts have long emphasized the strength of the rule of law as a key determinant of economic development and social opportunity. They also agree that the rule of law requires an effective and accountable legal system. The growth of transnational organized crime is a major impediment, however, to the creation of effective and accountable legal systems. nThis seminar examines how and why transnational criminal organizations have developed in Latin America, explores why they constitute a major challenge to the consolidation of democratic societies, economic development and individual rights. It also examines the efforts of governments to combat them, with a focus on the experiences of Mexico, Colombia, and Brazil. The course examines these cases in order to draw lessons¿by pointing to both successes and failures¿of use to policy analysts, legal scholars, and practitioners.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

IPS 248: America's War in Afghanistan: Multiple Actors and Divergent Strategies

Establishing clear and consistent political-military objectives when waging limited wars is an essential but difficult task. Efforts to develop coherent campaign strategies are complicated by competing interests among US government actors (diplomatic, development, military and intelligence), members of the coalition intervention force, and relevant international organizations. This course will examine post-9/11 efforts to defeat Al Qaeda and stabilize Afghanistan from the perspectives of key US, international, and Afghan actors including the White House, State Department, Defense Department, Central Intelligence Agency, United Nations, NATO, Pakistan, and Afghan political elite and civil society. Classes will include presentations by individuals with firsthand diplomatic and military experience in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 252: Implications of Post-1994 Conflicts in Great Lakes Region of Africa: an American Perspective

Seminar will explore the post-1994 conflicts in the Great Lakes Region from the perspective of the former US Special Envoy to the region. Particular emphasis will be placed on the intensified regional and international efforts to resolve these conflicts since the M23 rebellion of 2012. It will consider the implications these activities have for the region, legal accountability, international peacekeeping and the conduct of American foreign policy. The seminar will include the following segments: 1) the origins and nature of the post-1994 conflicts and recent efforts to resolve them with particular attention to the relationship between modern Congolese history and the Rwandan genocide and the peace-making efforts initiated by the Peace, Security and Cooperation Framework agreement of February 2013; 2) accountability for conflict-related crimes committed in the region including sex and gender-based crimes and the legal and other regimes established to address conflict minerals; and 3) th more »
Seminar will explore the post-1994 conflicts in the Great Lakes Region from the perspective of the former US Special Envoy to the region. Particular emphasis will be placed on the intensified regional and international efforts to resolve these conflicts since the M23 rebellion of 2012. It will consider the implications these activities have for the region, legal accountability, international peacekeeping and the conduct of American foreign policy. The seminar will include the following segments: 1) the origins and nature of the post-1994 conflicts and recent efforts to resolve them with particular attention to the relationship between modern Congolese history and the Rwandan genocide and the peace-making efforts initiated by the Peace, Security and Cooperation Framework agreement of February 2013; 2) accountability for conflict-related crimes committed in the region including sex and gender-based crimes and the legal and other regimes established to address conflict minerals; and 3) the broader implications of the conflict for American foreign policy in Africa (in particular and in general, and lessons learned about the way in which such policy is formulated) as well as the implications of this conflict for international peace-making and peace-keeping efforts. The course is cross-listed for IPS and law school students.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 275: UN Habitat III: Bridging Cities and Nations to Tackle Urban Development

From climate change to refugee housing, cities have powered into an expanding role in international affairs, helping national governments navigate critical global challenges. Every twenty years, the world convenes at the United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (HABITAT) to debate human settlement and collectively redraw our urban future. Using HABITAT III in Quito as a lens, we explore urban growth and governance; technology and finance; environmental and cultural sustainability; international negotiations and multilateral cooperation. Includes independent research on themes from HABITAT III and the New Urban Agenda.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 316S: Decision Making in U.S. Foreign Policy (POLISCI 316S)

Formal and informal processes involved in U.S. foreign policy decision making. The formation, conduct, and implementation of policy, emphasizing the role of the President and executive branch agencies. Theoretical and analytical perspectives; case studies. Interested students should attend the first day of class. Admission will be by permission of the instructor. Priority to IPS students.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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