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1 - 10 of 16 results for: IPS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

IPS 203: Issues in International Economics

Topics in international trade and international trade policy: trade, growth and poverty, the World Trade Organization (WTO), regionalism versus multilateralism, the political economy of trade policy, trade and labor, trade and the environment, and trade policies for developing economies. Prerequisite: ECON 51, ECON 166.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 208A: International Justice

This course will examine the arc of an atrocity. It begins with an introduction to the interdisciplinary scholarship on the causes and enablers of mass violence¿genocide, war crimes, terrorism, and state repression. It then considers political and legal responses ranging from humanitarian intervention (within and without the Responsibility to Protect framework), sanctions, commissions of inquiry, and accountability mechanisms, including criminal trials before international and domestic tribunals. The course will also explore the range of transitional justice mechanisms available to policymakers as societies emerge from periods of violence and repression, including truth commissions, lustrations, and amnesties. Coming full circle, the course will evaluate current efforts aimed at atrocity prevention, rather than response, including President Obama¿s atrocities prevention initiative. Readings address the philosophical underpinnings of justice, questions of institutional design, and the way in which different societies have balanced competing policy imperatives.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 241: International Security in a Changing World (HISTORY 104D, POLISCI 114S)

This class surveys the most pressing international security issues facing the world today and includes an award-winning two-day international crisis simulation led by Stanford faculty and former policymakers. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of Defense William Perry, former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Gen. Karl Eikenberry, and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. Major topics covered: cyber security, nuclear proliferation, insurgency and intervention, terrorism, the Arab Spring, and the future of U.S. leadership in the world. No prior background in international relations is necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

IPS 270: The Geopolitics of Energy

The global energy landscape is undergoing seismic shifts with game-changing economic, political and environmental ramifications. Technological breakthroughs are expanding the realms of production, reshuffling the competition among different sources of energy and altering the relative balance of power between energy exporters and importers. The US shale oil and gas bonanza is replacing worries about foreign oil dependence with an exuberance about the domestic resurgence of energy-intensive sectors. China¿s roaring appetite for energy imports propels its national oil companies to global prominence. Middle Eastern nations that used to reap power from oil wealth are bracing for a struggle for political relevance. Many African energy exporters are adopting promising strategies to break with a history dominated by the ¿resource curse¿.nThis course provides students with the knowledge, skill set and professional network to analyze how the present and past upheavals in oil and gas markets affect energy exporters and importers, their policymaking, and their relative power. Students will gain a truly global perspective thanks to a series of exciting international guest speakers and the opportunity to have an impact by working on a burning issue for a real world client.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jojarth, C. (PI)

IPS 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

IPS 206: Applied Statistics for Policy

Introduction to the use of statistical models, as relevant for decision making and data interpretation in policy contexts. Emphasis on regression analysis, as the most frequently used tool in quantitative policy analysis. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become intelligent consumers of regression analysis. Applied experience in both consuming and producing regression analyses, as well as knowledge of the underlying statistical theory.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

IPS 207A: Problem Solving and Decision Making for Public Policy and Social Change (PUBLPOL 305A)

This course introduces skills and bodies of knowledge useful for careers in law, public policy, and achieving social change at scale. These include framing problems; designing, implementing, and evaluating strategies; system design; cost-benefit analysis; decision making under uncertainty; heuristics and biases that affect empirical judgments and decision making; methods for influencing people's behavior ranging from incentives and penalties to "nudges;" and human-centered design. The course will be taught through problems, cases, and a field project to solve real-world problems on or near the Stanford campus, with the goal of integrating strategic thinking and behavioral insights with human-centered design and systems design. The course may be of interest to students in Law and Policy Lab practicums who wish to broaden their policy analysis skills. Enrollment: Limited to 32 students, with priority given to students in Law School, the MPP program, and the IPS program in that order. Students other than law students must seek the consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, midterm assignment, and final assignment. Cross-listed with International Policy Studies ( IPS 207A) & the Law School ( LAW 333).
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 209: Practicum

Applied policy exercises in various fields. Multidisciplinary student teams apply skills to a contemporary problem in a major international policy exercise with a public sector client such as a government agency. Problem analysis, interaction with the client and experts, and presentations. Emphasis is on effective written and oral communication to lay audiences of recommendations based on policy analysis. May be repeated for credit for a total of 10 units.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Blacker, C. (PI)

IPS 209A: IPS Master's Thesis

For IPS M.A. students only (by petition). Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 213: International Mediation and Civil Wars

This graduate seminar will examine international mediation efforts to achieve negotiated settlements for civil wars over the last two decades. Contending approaches to explain the success or failure of international mediation efforts will be examined in a number of cases from Africa (Sudan, Sierra Leone, Burundi), the Balkans (Bosnia, Macedonia), and Asia (Cambodia, Indonesia/Aceh).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)
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