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11 - 20 of 50 results for: IPS

IPS 208: Justice (ETHICSOC 171, PHIL 171, PHIL 271, POLISCI 103, POLISCI 136S, POLISCI 336S, PUBLPOL 103C, PUBLPOL 307)

Focus is on the ideal of a just society, and the place of liberty and equality in it, in light of contemporary theories of justice and political controversies. Topics include financing schools and elections, regulating markets, discriminating against people with disabilities, and enforcing sexual morality. Counts as Writing in the Major for PoliSci majors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

IPS 208A: International Justice

This course will examine the arc of an atrocity. It begins with an introduction to the interdisciplinary scholarship on the causes and enablers of mass violence¿genocide, war crimes, terrorism, and state repression. It then considers political and legal responses ranging from humanitarian intervention (within and without the Responsibility to Protect framework), sanctions, commissions of inquiry, and accountability mechanisms, including criminal trials before international and domestic tribunals. The course will also explore the range of transitional justice mechanisms available to policymakers as societies emerge from periods of violence and repression, including truth commissions, lustrations, and amnesties. Coming full circle, the course will evaluate current efforts aimed at atrocity prevention, rather than response, including President Obama¿s atrocities prevention initiative. Readings address the philosophical underpinnings of justice, questions of institutional design, and the way in which different societies have balanced competing policy imperatives.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 209: Practicum

Applied policy exercises in various fields. Multidisciplinary student teams apply skills to a contemporary problem in a major international policy exercise with a public sector client such as a government agency. Problem analysis, interaction with the client and experts, and presentations. Emphasis is on effective written and oral communication to lay audiences of recommendations based on policy analysis. Enrollment must be split between Autumn and Winter Quarters for a total of 8 units.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

IPS 209A: IPS Master's Thesis

For IPS M.A. students only (by petition). Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

IPS 210: The Politics of International Humanitarian Action

The relationship between humanitarianism and politics in international responses to civil conflicts and forced displacement. Focus is on policy dilemmas and choices, and the consequences of action or inaction. Case studies include northern Iraq (Kurdistan), Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, and Darfur. In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

IPS 211: The Transition from War to Peace: Peacebuilding Strategies

How to find sustainable solutions to intractable internal conflicts that lead to peace settlements. How institutions such as the UN, regional organizations, and international financial agencies attempt to support a peace process. Case studies include Bosnia, East Timor, Kosovo, Burundi, Liberia, and Afghanistan. In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

IPS 213: International Mediation and Civil Wars

This graduate seminar will examine international mediation efforts to achieve negotiated settlements for civil wars over the last two decades. Contending approaches to explain the success or failure of international mediation efforts will be examined in a number of cases from Africa (Sudan, Sierra Leone, Burundi), the Balkans (Bosnia, Macedonia), and Asia (Cambodia, Indonesia/Aceh). In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter. Satisfies the IPS Policy Writing Requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

IPS 219: Intelligence and National Security

How intelligence supports U.S. national security and foreign policies. How it has been used by U.S. presidents to become what it is today; organizational strengths and weaknesses; how it is monitored and held accountable to the goals of a democratic society; and successes and failures. Current intelligence analyses and national intelligence estimates are produced in support of simulated policy deliberations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fingar, T. (PI)

IPS 224: Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia

This course explores East Asia¿s rapid economic development and the current economic challenges. For the purpose of this course, we will focus on China, Japan, and Korea. The first part of the course examines economic growth in East Asia and the main mechanisms. In this context, we will examine government and industrial policy, international trade, firms and business groups, and human capital. We will discuss the validity of an East Asian model for economic growth. However, rapid economic growth and development in East Asia was followed by economic stagnation and financial crisis. The second part of the course focuses on the current economic challenges confronting these countries, in particular, inequality, demography, and entrepreneurship and innovation. Readings will come from books, journal articles, reports, news articles, and case studies. Many of the readings will have an empirical component and students will be able to develop their understanding of how empirical evidence is presented in articles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lee, Y. (PI)

IPS 225: Innovation-Based Economic Growth: Silicon Valley and Japan (EASTASN 151, EASTASN 251)

Innovation is essential for the growth of a matured economy. An important reason for Japan's economic stagnation over the past two decades was its failure to transform its economic system from one suited for catch-up growth to one that supports innovation-based economic growth. This course examines the institutional factors that support innovation-based economic growth and explores policies that may encourage innovation-based growth in Japan. The course is a part of a bigger policy implementation project that aims to examine the institutional foundations of innovation-based economic growth, to suggest government policies that encourage innovation-based growth in Japan, and to help implement such policies. The central part of the course will be several group research projects conducted by the students. Each student research project evaluates a concrete innovation policy idea. Each student research group is to report the findings to the class and prepare the final paper.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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