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21 - 30 of 48 results for: IPS

IPS 280: Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals (ETHICSOC 280, INTNLREL 180A)

Historical backdrop of the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals. The creation and operation of the Yugoslav and Rwanda Tribunals (ICTY and ICTR). The development of hybrid tribunals in East Timor, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, including evaluation of their success in addressing perceived shortcomings of the ICTY and ICTR. Examination of the role of the International Criminal Court and the extent to which it will succeed in supplanting all other ad hoc international justice mechanisms and fulfill its goals. Analysis focuses on the politics of creating such courts, their interaction with the states in which the conflicts took place, the process of establishing prosecutorial priorities, the body of law they have produced, and their effectiveness in addressing the needs of victims in post-conflict societies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

IPS 300: Issues in International Policy Studies

Presentations of techniques and applications of international policy analysis by students, faculty, and guests, including policy analysis practitioners.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

IPS 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

IPS 206: Applied Statistics for Policy

Introduction to the use of statistical models, as relevant for decision making and data interpretation in policy contexts. Emphasis on regression analysis, as the most frequently used tool in quantitative policy analysis. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become intelligent consumers of regression analysis. Applied experience in both consuming and producing regression analyses, as well as knowledge of the underlying statistical theory.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

IPS 207A: Problem Solving and Decision Making for Public Policy and Social Change (PUBLPOL 305A)

This course introduces skills and bodies of knowledge useful for careers in law, public policy, and achieving social change at scale. These include framing problems; designing, implementing, and evaluating strategies; system design; cost-benefit analysis; decision making under uncertainty; heuristics and biases that affect empirical judgments and decision making; methods for influencing people's behavior ranging from incentives and penalties to "nudges;" and human-centered design. The course will be taught through problems, cases, and a field project to solve real-world problems on or near the Stanford campus, with the goal of integrating strategic thinking and behavioral insights with human-centered design and systems design. The course may be of interest to students in Law and Policy Lab practicums who wish to broaden their policy analysis skills. Enrollment: Limited to 32 students, with priority given to students in Law School, the MPP program, and the IPS program in that order. Students other than law students must seek the consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, midterm assignment, and final assignment. Cross-listed with International Policy Studies ( IPS 207A) & the Law School ( LAW 333).
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 209: Practicum

Applied policy exercises in various fields. Multidisciplinary student teams apply skills to a contemporary problem in a major international policy exercise with a public sector client such as a government agency. Problem analysis, interaction with the client and experts, and presentations. Emphasis is on effective written and oral communication to lay audiences of recommendations based on policy analysis. May be repeated for credit for a total of 10 units.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Blacker, C. (PI)

IPS 209A: IPS Master's Thesis

For IPS M.A. students only (by petition). Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 213: International Mediation and Civil Wars

This graduate seminar will examine international mediation efforts to achieve negotiated settlements for civil wars over the last two decades. Contending approaches to explain the success or failure of international mediation efforts will be examined in a number of cases from Africa (Sudan, Sierra Leone, Burundi), the Balkans (Bosnia, Macedonia), and Asia (Cambodia, Indonesia/Aceh).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

IPS 224: Economic Growth, Development, and Challenges of East Asia

This course explores economic growth and development in East Asia and the region¿s current economic policy issues. For the purpose of this course, we will largely focus on China, Japan, and Korea. However, we will incorporate Southeast Asia when relevant. The first part of the course examines economic growth in East Asia and the development strategies pursued. Cross country comparisons will help draw similarities but also differences in the development processes. We will also discuss the validity of an East Asian model for economic growth. The second part of the course focuses on the specific factors relating to economic development, e.g., human capital, firms, infrastructure, institutions, democracy, political leaders, etc. We will also discuss the current challenges and policy issues. Readings will come from books, journal articles, reports, news articles, and case studies. Many of the readings will have an empirical component and students will be able to develop their understanding of how empirical evidence is presented in articles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lee, Y. (PI)

IPS 225: Innovation-Based Economic Growth: Silicon Valley and Japan (EASTASN 151, EASTASN 251)

Innovation is essential for the growth of a matured economy. An important reason for Japan's economic stagnation over the past two decades was its failure to transform its economic system from one suited for catch-up growth to one that supports innovation-based economic growth. This course examines the institutional factors that support innovation-based economic growth and explores policies that may encourage innovation-based growth in Japan. The course is a part of a bigger policy implementation project that aims to examine the institutional foundations of innovation-based economic growth, to suggest government policies that encourage innovation-based growth in Japan, and to help implement such policies. The central part of the course will be several group research projects conducted by the students. Each student research project evaluates a concrete innovation policy idea. Each student research group is to report the findings to the class and prepare the final paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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