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41 - 50 of 50 results for: INTLPOL ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

INTLPOL 310: Policy Change Studio

Collaboration with real-world partners to define solutions to pressing policy problems. Students work in teams and are guided by the teaching team, along with project-specific advice from a faculty mentor and an external advisor. Students may also travel in order to collect data and meet with stakeholders. The capstone course takes place winter and spring quarters of the second year and revolves around a cutting-edge policy-making framework. Drawing from methods learned in the core courses, each group will work through the framework in parallel, analyzing their problem, developing a solution, and navigating a successful implementation. (Enrollment limited to second-year International Policy students.)
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit

INTLPOL 310A: Capstone Field Research

Students travel with their policy change studio teams to collaborate with partner organizations, gather data, perform assessments, and analyze in-country aspects of their capstone project. (Limited to International Policy students enrolled concurrently in INTLPOL 310: Policy Change Studio.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

INTLPOL 321: Fundamentals of Cyber Policy and Security

This course will provide an introduction to fundamental issues in cyber policy and security. It will focus on the way that cyber issues impact people and organizations across sectors - from government and law to business, tech, and others - and how people and organizations can and should approach the myriad cyber challenges. This is not a technical or computer science course and no technical background nor prerequisites are necessary. In the first part of the course, we will introduce cyber policy and security fundamentals. The second part of the course will explore cyber policy and security aspects related to economics, psychology, law, warfare, international relations, critical infrastructure, privacy, and innovation. The third part of the course will be focused mostly on a number of case studies designed to simulate the challenges faced by policy-makers and executive-level decision makers. This course is heavily discussion-based and so attendance is required. Assignments will consist of three short papers and a take-home final exam. All graduate students are welcome to enroll, especially those in the international policy, law, and business programs. Undergraduate enrollment only by permission of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Grotto, A. (PI)

INTLPOL 323: Free Speech, Democracy and the Internet

( LAW 7082) This course will cover contemporary challenges to democracy presented by the Internet. Topics will include disinformation, polarization, hate speech, media transformation, election integrity, and legal regulation of internet platforms in the U.S. and abroad. Guest speakers from academia and industry will present on these topics in each class session, followed by a discussion. Students will be responsible for one-page papers each week on the readings and a research paper to be turned in at the fall paper deadline. Students can take the seminar for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the research paper length. This class is limited to 30 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (20 students will be selected by lottery) and 10 non-law students by consent of instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with COMM 153B/ 253B.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

INTLPOL 350: International Law

( LAW 5013) This course provides a general introduction to international law and its role in today's complex and interdependent world. We will begin by considering fundamental questions about the nature of international law, such as: the origins of international law in the sovereign equality of states; the sources of international law (including treaties and customary international law); the subjects of international law; principles of state responsibility; the bases upon which states may exercise jurisdiction; and the global governance challenges arising from the absence of assured mechanisms for the interpretation or enforcement of international law. We will then examine the operation of international law in the U.S. legal system. In the second half of the course, we will look at a series of contemporary international law topics and issues, including international human rights law, the law governing coercion and the use of armed force, the law of armed conflict, international environ more »
( LAW 5013) This course provides a general introduction to international law and its role in today's complex and interdependent world. We will begin by considering fundamental questions about the nature of international law, such as: the origins of international law in the sovereign equality of states; the sources of international law (including treaties and customary international law); the subjects of international law; principles of state responsibility; the bases upon which states may exercise jurisdiction; and the global governance challenges arising from the absence of assured mechanisms for the interpretation or enforcement of international law. We will then examine the operation of international law in the U.S. legal system. In the second half of the course, we will look at a series of contemporary international law topics and issues, including international human rights law, the law governing coercion and the use of armed force, the law of armed conflict, international environmental law, and international criminal law. Throughout, we will consider current issues and problems arising in the international arena and the extent to which international law affects the behavior of states. This course provides a general grounding in public international law and a foundation for more advanced or specialized international law courses. Elements used in grading: Class participation, optional paper, and final exam. (Formally Law 479)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

INTLPOL 351: Law of Democracy

( LAW 7036) This course is intended to give students a basic understanding of the themes in the legal regulation of elections and politics. We will cover all the major Supreme Court cases on topics of voting rights, reapportionment/redistricting, ballot access, regulation of political parties, campaign finance, and the 2000 presidential election controversy. The course pays particular attention to competing political philosophies and empirical assumptions that underlie the Court's reasoning while still focusing on the cases as litigation tools used to serve political ends. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam. Cross-listed with Comm 361 Polisci 327C. (Formerly Law 577)
Terms: Win | Units: 3

INTLPOL 352: State Building and the Rule of Law Seminar

( LAW 5103) This Seminar is centrally concerned with bridging theory and practice. The seminar introduces the key theories relevant to state-building generally, and strengthening the rule of law in particular. This course explores the multidisciplinary nature of development --- through readings, lectures, guest lectures, case studies, and seminar discussions --- and asks how lawyers fit in and contribute to the process? The set of developing countries considered within the scope of this workshop is broad. It includes, among others, states engaged in post-conflict reconstruction, e.g., Cambodia, Timor Leste, Rwanda, Iraq, Sierra Leone; states still in conflict, e.g., Afghanistan, Somalia; the poorest states of the world that may not fall neatly into the categories of conflict or post-conflict, e.g., Nepal, Haiti; least developed states that are not marked by high levels of violent conflict at all, e.g., Bhutan; and more developed states at critical stages of transition, e.g., Tunisia, G more »
( LAW 5103) This Seminar is centrally concerned with bridging theory and practice. The seminar introduces the key theories relevant to state-building generally, and strengthening the rule of law in particular. This course explores the multidisciplinary nature of development --- through readings, lectures, guest lectures, case studies, and seminar discussions --- and asks how lawyers fit in and contribute to the process? The set of developing countries considered within the scope of this workshop is broad. It includes, among others, states engaged in post-conflict reconstruction, e.g., Cambodia, Timor Leste, Rwanda, Iraq, Sierra Leone; states still in conflict, e.g., Afghanistan, Somalia; the poorest states of the world that may not fall neatly into the categories of conflict or post-conflict, e.g., Nepal, Haiti; least developed states that are not marked by high levels of violent conflict at all, e.g., Bhutan; and more developed states at critical stages of transition, e.g., Tunisia, Georgia, Hungary. Grading is based on participation, a presentation of research or a proposal, and, in consultation with the professor, a research paper. The research paper may be a group project or an individual in-depth research proposal, either of which could be the basis for future field research. CONSENT APPLICATION: The seminar is open by consent to up to sixteen (16) JD, SPILS, and LLM students, and graduate students from other departments within Stanford University. This course is taught in conjunction with the India Field Study component ( Law 5026). Students may enroll for this course alone or for both this course and Law 5026 with consent of the instructor (12 students will come to India). To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. (Formerly Law 259)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

INTLPOL 358: Business, Social Responsibility, and Human Rights

Large corporations now routinely spend millions of dollars to protect human rights and the environment. Shell Nigeria builds hospitals and schools in the Niger Delta. Nike employs hundreds of inspectors to improve conditions for the factory workers who produce its shoes across Asia and Latin America. Technology companies such as Facebook have scrambled to fend off the threat of new regulation since the Cambridge Analytica revelations. Other examples abound, across industries and around the globe. "Don't be evil" (Google's former motto) may be one motivation for these companies, but something more mundane is also at work: many companies believe they will do well, financially, if they do good, ethically. This course examines questions that lawyers in large law firms, corporations, NGOs, and government agencies regularly confront: --What does it mean for a company to "do good"? Should it care? --When does it serve a company's interest to take costly action to address human rights, labor, more »
Large corporations now routinely spend millions of dollars to protect human rights and the environment. Shell Nigeria builds hospitals and schools in the Niger Delta. Nike employs hundreds of inspectors to improve conditions for the factory workers who produce its shoes across Asia and Latin America. Technology companies such as Facebook have scrambled to fend off the threat of new regulation since the Cambridge Analytica revelations. Other examples abound, across industries and around the globe. "Don't be evil" (Google's former motto) may be one motivation for these companies, but something more mundane is also at work: many companies believe they will do well, financially, if they do good, ethically. This course examines questions that lawyers in large law firms, corporations, NGOs, and government agencies regularly confront: --What does it mean for a company to "do good"? Should it care? --When does it serve a company's interest to take costly action to address human rights, labor, and environmental concerns? --What tactics have activists used to shift public opinion, media frames, and the law, and thereby change companies' incentives? We will learn through seminar-style discussion, lectures, role play, and small group exercises. Several guest speakers with experience in business, advocacy, or in between will provide insights from their experiences on the ground. Special Instructions: Students have the option to write a long research paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Written Assignments; Final Exam or Final Paper. Cross-listed with the Law School ( LAW 1047).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

INTLPOL 801: TGR Project

(Formerly IPS 801)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

INTLPOL 802: TGR Dissertation

(Formerly IPS 802)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit
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