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11 - 20 of 50 results for: INTLPOL ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

INTLPOL 231B: Understanding Russia: Its Power and Purpose in a New Global Order (POLISCI 213C, REES 231B)

Russia presents a puzzle for theories of socio-economic development and modernization and their relationship to state power in international politics. The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 brought into being the new Russia (or Russian Federation) as its successor in international politics. Russia suffered one of the worst recessions and experienced 25 years of halting reform. Despite these issues, Russia is again a central player in international affairs. Course analyzes motivations behind contemporary Russian foreign policy by reviewing its domestic and economic underpinnings. Examination of concept of state power in international politics to assess Russia's capabilities to influence other states' policies, and under what conditions its leaders use these resources. Is contemporary Russia strong or weak? What are the resources and constraints its projection of power beyond its borders? What are the determinants of state power in international politics in the twenty-first century? Includes lectures, readings, class discussions, films and documentaries.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

INTLPOL 232: Foreign Policy Decision Making in Comparative Perspective (POLISCI 242, POLISCI 342)

This seminar will examine how countries and multilateral organizations make decisions about foreign and international policy. The hypothesis to be explored in the course is that individuals, bureaucracies, and interest groups shape foreign policy decisions. That hypothesis will be tested against other more structural explanations of how countries behave in the international system. After a brief review of the academic literature in the first part of the course, the seminar will focus on several cases studies of foreign policy decision-making by the United States, China, Russia, Iran, and North Korea, as well as the United Nations and NATO. This seminar is intended for masters students and fourth-year undergraduates. NOTE: The enrollment of the class is by application only. Please send a one page document to Mahlorei Bruce Apalis, mahlorei@stanford.edu by March 10th with the following information: full name, class year, major, contact email, which version of the course you want to enrol more »
This seminar will examine how countries and multilateral organizations make decisions about foreign and international policy. The hypothesis to be explored in the course is that individuals, bureaucracies, and interest groups shape foreign policy decisions. That hypothesis will be tested against other more structural explanations of how countries behave in the international system. After a brief review of the academic literature in the first part of the course, the seminar will focus on several cases studies of foreign policy decision-making by the United States, China, Russia, Iran, and North Korea, as well as the United Nations and NATO. This seminar is intended for masters students and fourth-year undergraduates. NOTE: The enrollment of the class is by application only. Please send a one page document to Mahlorei Bruce Apalis, mahlorei@stanford.edu by March 10th with the following information: full name, class year, major, contact email, which version of the course you want to enroll in (e.g., POLISCI or INTLPOL). In the document please also outline previous associated coursework and/or relevant experience and write why you want to enroll in the seminar. Application results will be announced on March 22nd. Any questions related to this course can be directed to Mahlorei Bruce Apalis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: McFaul, M. (PI)

INTLPOL 233: Presidential Decision Making in Wartime (A Practitioner's Handbook)

This course will analyze how presidents approach the most consequential matters of war and peace. It will discuss how presidents oversee military operations once initiated. It will consider how presidents can avoid embarking on objectives that are unlikely to succeed at reasonable cost.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: McGurk, B. (PI)

INTLPOL 236: American Grand Strategy

This course examines the origin and practice of American grand strategy in foreign affairs. The course will cover the making of American grand strategy and focus on applying these models to evaluate trends in American foreign policy after World War II. The course will also explore alternative approaches to grand strategy from the perspective of China and Russia, ¿great power competitors¿ that the Trump administration has sought to define as a focal point for U.S. foreign policy. Throughout the quarter, we will consider the merits and risks of a ¿grand strategy¿ approach to the world after the end of the Cold War, and whether it is realistic in a hyper-partisan era to agree on bipartisan principles for America¿s proper role in the world. We will aim to develop such a set of principles. Enrollment priority will be given to graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

INTLPOL 238: Social Movements in the Post Spring Arab World

This course analyzes the role of social movements such as labor movements, student unions, women¿s movements, and human rights groups in shaping political realities in the Arab world after the brief period of democratic uprisings 2011-2013. It develops an in depth understanding of the challenges facing social movements in a social environment shaped by patriarchal values and in a political landscape driven by autocratic governments.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Hamzawy, A. (PI)

INTLPOL 240: Contemporary Issues in International Security

This seminar examines a range of the most pressing international security challenges facing states today and explores theoretically informed and pragmatic policies for better addressing these challenges. Topics include but are not limited to nuclear proliferation, terrorism, insurgency, great power competition, and climate change. Students are expected to engage actively in class discussions, present on select course topics and critique class presentations. Enrollment priority will be given to students in the Master's in International Policy.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Felter, J. (PI)

INTLPOL 241: International Security in a Changing World (POLISCI 114S)

This class examines the most pressing international security problems facing the world today: nuclear crises, non-proliferation, insurgencies and civil wars, terrorism, and climate change. Alternative perspectives - from political science, history, and STS (Science, Technology, and Society) studies - are used to analyze these problems. The class includes an award-winning two-day international negotiation simulation.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

INTLPOL 244: U.S. Policy toward Northeast Asia

(Formerly IPS 244) This course offers a case-study approach to an examination of contemporary U.S. policy towards Japan, Korea, and China. It will look at the historical evolution of U.S. foreign policy and the dynamics and drivers of US policy in Northeast Asia. It will examine selected dimensions of US-China relations, US-Japan relations, and relations and policy toward South and North Korea. It will also discuss US relations with Russia and Taiwan. The class will focus on the cases of US security policy in the region, economic and trade policy, and human rights and democracy policy. Each week the class will combine lectures with student presentations in a seminar-style setting. Grades will be based on oral presentations, and on midterm and final take-home exams.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

INTLPOL 246: China's Foreign Policies: Objectives, Instruments, and Impacts

(Formerly IPS 246) China is a global actor and its foreign policies are designed to protect and advance increasingly diverse interests in every country and region. Some interests and policies are common to all regions and have remained relatively stable over time; others are tailored to meet specific objectives and respond to the perceptions, objectives, and demands of particular countries. This course will help you to understand the domestic and international drivers and shapers of China¿s foreign policies and actions and how they have changed as China has become more developed, more prosperous, and more deeply integrated into the international system.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Fingar, T. (PI)

INTLPOL 250: International Conflict Resolution (PSYCH 383)

(Formerly IPS 250) (Same as LAW 5009; formerly Law 656) This seminar examines the challenges of managing and resolving intractable political and violent intergroup and international conflicts. Employing an interdisciplinary approach drawing on social psychology, political science, game theory, and international law, the course identifies various tactical, psychological, and structural barriers that can impede the achievement of efficient solutions to conflicts. We will explore a conceptual framework for conflict management and resolution that draws not only on theoretical insights, but also builds on historical examples and practical experience in the realm of conflict resolution. This approach examines the need for the parties to conflicts to address the following questions in order to have prospects of creating peaceful relationships: (1) how can the parties to conflict develop a vision of a mutually bearable shared future; (2) how can parties develop trust in the enemy; (3) how c more »
(Formerly IPS 250) (Same as LAW 5009; formerly Law 656) This seminar examines the challenges of managing and resolving intractable political and violent intergroup and international conflicts. Employing an interdisciplinary approach drawing on social psychology, political science, game theory, and international law, the course identifies various tactical, psychological, and structural barriers that can impede the achievement of efficient solutions to conflicts. We will explore a conceptual framework for conflict management and resolution that draws not only on theoretical insights, but also builds on historical examples and practical experience in the realm of conflict resolution. This approach examines the need for the parties to conflicts to address the following questions in order to have prospects of creating peaceful relationships: (1) how can the parties to conflict develop a vision of a mutually bearable shared future; (2) how can parties develop trust in the enemy; (3) how can each side be persuaded, as part of a negotiated settlement, to accept losses that it will find very painful; and (4) how do we overcome the perceptions of injustice that each side are likely to have towards any compromise solution? We will consider both particular conflicts, such as the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the South African transition to majority rule, as well as cross-cutting issues, such as the role international legal rules play in facilitating or impeding conflict resolution, the ways intragroup dynamics affect intergroup conflict resolution efforts, and the role of criminal accountability for atrocities following civil wars. Special Instructions: Section 01: Grades will be based on class participation, written assignments, and a final exam. Section 02: Up to five students, with consent of the instructor, will have the option to write an independent research paper for Research (R) credit in lieu of the written assignments and final exam for Section 01. After the term begins, students (max 5) accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)
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