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11 - 20 of 27 results for: INTLPOL

INTLPOL 259: Research Topics in Cyber Conflict and Information Warfare

Research seminar on cyber conflict and information warfare. Student and faculty member will agree on one or more topics for research, and student will prepare a topic-relevant paper of approximately 4000 words per unit. A longer paper on one topic or two or three shorter papers on different topics are acceptable. One in-class oral presentation on paper topic is required. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Lin, H. (PI)

INTLPOL 259A: Research Seminar on Cybersecurity: Automotive Safety, Security, and Privacy

The course will explore the safety, security and privacy implications of the automobile. The modern automobile is a computer on wheels, with processors, sensors and networked connectivity managing hundreds of safety-critical functions. Automation will further drive the evolution of cars from the analog, mechanically-operated vehicles of the 20th century to the digital, AI-driven automobile of the 21st century. Overall, digitization has made cars safer, greener, and more enjoyable to ride in. But this digitization also introduces new risks. Cybersecurity vulnerabilities can expose vehicle occupants, commuters and pedestrians to safety and privacy risks. In addition to the physical, economic and psychological harms experienced by victims of cybersecurity attacks and intrusions, such attacks could undermine consumer and policy-maker confidence in the trustworthiness of digitally-dependent vehicles. The automotive industry and government regulators are in the formative stages of developing more »
The course will explore the safety, security and privacy implications of the automobile. The modern automobile is a computer on wheels, with processors, sensors and networked connectivity managing hundreds of safety-critical functions. Automation will further drive the evolution of cars from the analog, mechanically-operated vehicles of the 20th century to the digital, AI-driven automobile of the 21st century. Overall, digitization has made cars safer, greener, and more enjoyable to ride in. But this digitization also introduces new risks. Cybersecurity vulnerabilities can expose vehicle occupants, commuters and pedestrians to safety and privacy risks. In addition to the physical, economic and psychological harms experienced by victims of cybersecurity attacks and intrusions, such attacks could undermine consumer and policy-maker confidence in the trustworthiness of digitally-dependent vehicles. The automotive industry and government regulators are in the formative stages of developing regulatory and governance frameworks for these risks, which may have broader implications for regulatory policy concerning digital technologies generally. Students will accompany the instructor on a deep dive into the regulatory, business, and geopolitical dimensions of the automobile. Each student will be expected to use the course to produce a publication-quality research paper on a relevant topic of their choosing (in consultation with the instructor), with mentorship from the instructor and peer support from fellow classmates. (Students may register for 2-4 units with increased research paper word count per unit. 10 slots, graduate students only, undergraduates by permission of instructor.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4
Instructors: Grotto, A. (PI)

INTLPOL 268D: Online Open Source Investigation

This course is a practical introduction to online open source investigation -- internet research using free and publicly available information. The course will cover domain investigations, social media research, strategies for geolocation and chronolocation (placing videos or images at a point in time), image verification, and research on individuals. We will discuss the discovery process, i.e. identifying potentially inauthentic information in the first place. Students will learn best practices related to archiving and note taking. The goal of the course is to prepare students for online open source research in jobs in the public sector, with technology companies, human rights organizations, and other research and advocacy groups.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Grossman, S. (PI)

INTLPOL 269: Cyber Law: International and Domestic Legal Frameworks for Cyber Policy

(Formerly IPS 269) Was Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. elections an act of war? When do cyber attacks constitute a use of force? Is sovereignty in cyberspace different than in other domains, and can states meaningfully defend their sovereignty in cyberspace? Is hacking back against cyber thieves the legal equivalent of defending one's own property? How should states respond to cyber espionage and information operations, and what legal options are available? This course explores the domestic and international law of cyberspace and its application to significant practical challenges. It also addresses broader legal policy questions, including the extent to which law acts as a constraint on state and non-state actors in cyberspace, whether the application of existing law to cyber activities is sufficient or new laws and norms are needed, and how they could be developed. Policy and law students are welcome; no previous legal knowledge is required. Please note that the course will run 10 minutes longer per class session than listed due to American Bar Association requirements for the Stanford Law School. (Cross-listed with LAW 4035.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

INTLPOL 280: Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals (ETHICSOC 280, HUMRTS 103, INTNLREL 180A)

(Formerly IPS 280) Historical backdrop of the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals. The creation and operation of the Yugoslav and Rwanda Tribunals (ICTY and ICTR). The development of hybrid tribunals in East Timor, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, including evaluation of their success in addressing perceived shortcomings of the ICTY and ICTR. Examination of the role of the International Criminal Court and the extent to which it will succeed in supplanting all other ad hoc international justice mechanisms and fulfill its goals. Analysis focuses on the politics of creating such courts, their interaction with the states in which the conflicts took place, the process of establishing prosecutorial priorities, the body of law they have produced, and their effectiveness in addressing the needs of victims in post-conflict societies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

INTLPOL 291: Theories of Change in Global Health (SOMGEN 207)

Open to graduate students studying in any discipline whose research work or interest engages global health. Upper-class undergraduates who have completed at least one of the prerequisite courses and who are willing to commit the preparatory time for a graduate level seminar class are welcome. The course undertakes a critical assessment of how different academic disciplines frame global health problems and recommend pathways toward improvements. Focuses on evaluating examples of both success and failure of different theories of change in specific global health implementations. Prerequisites: ECON 118, CEE 265D, HUMBIO 129S or HUMBIO 124C.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)

INTLPOL 298: Practical Training

(Formerly IPS 298) Students obtain internship in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree program and area of concentration. Prior to enrolling, students must get the internship approved by the Master's in International Policy careers and student services teams. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship. Limited to International Policy (INTLPOL) students only. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

INTLPOL 299: Directed Reading

(Formerly IPS 299) Directed reading in International Policy. To be considered for enrollment, interested students must first submit the International Policy Directed Reading Proposal, which is available online ( https://fsi.stanford.edu/masters-degree/student-resources) and due no later than the second Friday of the academic quarter in which they would like to enroll. Proposal requires signature of the advising instructor. If approved, a directed reading section will be created for the instructor (if s/he does not already have a section). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

INTLPOL 300: Policy Seminar for MIP

(Formerly IPS 300) Seminars and speaker series offered by programs and centers at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. Quarterly, students must attend a minimum of eight sessions that are relevant to their area of specialization. Details on speaker series and colloquia available on course Canvas site. Required for, and limited to, second-year students in International Policy (i.e., Class of 2020). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

INTLPOL 300S: Leading Effective Teams

In this interactive course students will develop practical skills for leading effective teams, and will apply their learning in group projects (1st year) and in their capstone (2nd year). Topics include understanding of group development stages and different work styles, setting and tracking group norms, developing mutual accountability mechanisms to ensure productivity, creating efficient decision making processes, resolving conflict, and leveraging cultural diversity. Enrollment limited to first-year Master's in International Policy (MIP) students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
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