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11 - 18 of 18 results for: INTLPOL ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

INTLPOL 300: Policy Seminar for MIP

(Formerly IPS 300) Seminars and speaker series offered by programs and centers at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. Quarterly, students must attend a minimum of eight sessions that are relevant to their area of specialization. Details on speaker series and colloquia available on course Canvas site. Required for, and limited to, second-year students in International Policy (i.e., Class of 2020). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

INTLPOL 300A: International Policy Speaker Series

Presentations on international policy topics by Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies faculty and guests. Includes discussion with students. Required for first-year M.A. students in International Policy. Optional for second-year M.A. students in International Policy (to be taken in place of INTLPOL 300). Enrollment is limited to MIP students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

INTLPOL 301A: Research Methods and Policy Applications I

The first quarter will cover the fundamentals of probability theory and statistics that students need in order to read, critically evaluate, and undertake policy-relevant quantitative research. Topics covered include random variables, probability distributions and their moments, inference, estimation, hypothesis testing, statistical power, and ordinary least squares regression. We will devote substantial time to "learning by doing" using statistics software. Students will use the R programming language to learn the basics of programming, generate data, manipulate real-world datasets, and demonstrate/visualize theoretical concepts in statistics and mathematics. We will present examples of real-world research and students will evaluate and demonstrate the extent to which it matches up with concepts covered in lecture.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

INTLPOL 302: The Global Economy

This course examines the economic inter-connectedness of nations. Among the topics covered are the causes and consequences of current account imbalances, exchange rate determination, monetary unification, financial and currency crises, and contagion. In addition, the course includes an assessment of key global financial institutions, such as the International Monetary Fund, and the global effort to reform the international financial architecture. The goal of the course is to equip students with the tools to analyze international macroeconomic issues, events, and policies. Students will analyze economic data of countries with a view to assessing the economic health and vulnerabilities of countries. They will propose policies to address the identified economic vulnerabilities, and will assess the feasibility of policy implementation. In addition, the "In the News" segment in class will discuss and analyze current events in areas relevant to the course. (This course was formerly IPS 202.) Enrollment limited to Master's in International Policy (MIP) students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

INTLPOL 352: State Building and the Rule of Law Seminar

( LAW 5103) This Seminar is centrally concerned with bridging theory and practice. The seminar introduces the key theories relevant to state-building generally, and strengthening the rule of law in particular. This course explores the multidisciplinary nature of development --- through readings, lectures, guest lectures, case studies, and seminar discussions --- and asks how lawyers fit in and contribute to the process? The set of developing countries considered within the scope of this workshop is broad. It includes, among others, states engaged in post-conflict reconstruction, e.g., Cambodia, Timor Leste, Rwanda, Iraq, Sierra Leone; states still in conflict, e.g., Afghanistan, Somalia; the poorest states of the world that may not fall neatly into the categories of conflict or post-conflict, e.g., Nepal, Haiti; least developed states that are not marked by high levels of violent conflict at all, e.g., Bhutan; and more developed states at critical stages of transition, e.g., Tunisia, G more »
( LAW 5103) This Seminar is centrally concerned with bridging theory and practice. The seminar introduces the key theories relevant to state-building generally, and strengthening the rule of law in particular. This course explores the multidisciplinary nature of development --- through readings, lectures, guest lectures, case studies, and seminar discussions --- and asks how lawyers fit in and contribute to the process? The set of developing countries considered within the scope of this workshop is broad. It includes, among others, states engaged in post-conflict reconstruction, e.g., Cambodia, Timor Leste, Rwanda, Iraq, Sierra Leone; states still in conflict, e.g., Afghanistan, Somalia; the poorest states of the world that may not fall neatly into the categories of conflict or post-conflict, e.g., Nepal, Haiti; least developed states that are not marked by high levels of violent conflict at all, e.g., Bhutan; and more developed states at critical stages of transition, e.g., Tunisia, Georgia, Hungary. Grading is based on participation, a presentation of research or a proposal, and, in consultation with the professor, a research paper. The research paper may be a group project or an individual in-depth research proposal, either of which could be the basis for future field research. CONSENT APPLICATION: The seminar is open by consent to up to sixteen (16) JD, SPILS, and LLM students, and graduate students from other departments within Stanford University. This course is taught in conjunction with the India Field Study component ( Law 5026). Students may enroll for this course alone or for both this course and Law 5026 with consent of the instructor (12 students will come to India). To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. (Formerly Law 259)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

INTLPOL 358: Business, Social Responsibility, and Human Rights

Large corporations now routinely spend millions of dollars to protect human rights and the environment. Shell Nigeria builds hospitals and schools in the Niger Delta. Nike employs hundreds of inspectors to improve conditions for the factory workers who produce its shoes across Asia and Latin America. Technology companies such as Facebook have scrambled to fend off the threat of new regulation since the Cambridge Analytica revelations. Other examples abound, across industries and around the globe. "Don't be evil" (Google's former motto) may be one motivation for these companies, but something more mundane is also at work: many companies believe they will do well, financially, if they do good, ethically. This course examines questions that lawyers in large law firms, corporations, NGOs, and government agencies regularly confront: --What does it mean for a company to "do good"? Should it care? --When does it serve a company's interest to take costly action to address human rights, labor, more »
Large corporations now routinely spend millions of dollars to protect human rights and the environment. Shell Nigeria builds hospitals and schools in the Niger Delta. Nike employs hundreds of inspectors to improve conditions for the factory workers who produce its shoes across Asia and Latin America. Technology companies such as Facebook have scrambled to fend off the threat of new regulation since the Cambridge Analytica revelations. Other examples abound, across industries and around the globe. "Don't be evil" (Google's former motto) may be one motivation for these companies, but something more mundane is also at work: many companies believe they will do well, financially, if they do good, ethically. This course examines questions that lawyers in large law firms, corporations, NGOs, and government agencies regularly confront: --What does it mean for a company to "do good"? Should it care? --When does it serve a company's interest to take costly action to address human rights, labor, and environmental concerns? --What tactics have activists used to shift public opinion, media frames, and the law, and thereby change companies' incentives? We will learn through seminar-style discussion, lectures, role play, and small group exercises. Several guest speakers with experience in business, advocacy, or in between will provide insights from their experiences on the ground. Special Instructions: Students have the option to write a long research paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Written Assignments; Final Exam or Final Paper. Cross-listed with the Law School ( LAW 1047).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

INTLPOL 801: TGR Project

(Formerly IPS 801)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

INTLPOL 802: TGR Dissertation

(Formerly IPS 802)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit
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