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41 - 50 of 64 results for: ILAC

ILAC 263: Visions of the Andes

Themes like "people," "revolt," "community," "utopia" and "landscape" are central to 20th century Andean narrative and its accompanying critical apparatus. The course reviews major works of Andean literature to reconsider the aesthetic and intellectual legacy of modernity and modernization in the region. We discuss changes in recent literature and film. Special attention is payed to post-conflict Peru and Evo Morales' Bolivia.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ILAC 268: INDIGENISMOS REVISITED

How are indigenous peoples represented in Mexico and Peru in the early 20th century? Why do we call that literature and visual art indigenista? What is the relationship between indigenista art, revolution and the nation? How do we examine indigenismos now?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 269: Realismo Mágico vs. Real Maravilloso

Two important concepts and theories realismo mágico and lo Real maravilloso have given sense and substance to Latin American literature during the last three decades. This course will focus on those concepts and on the works of Garcia Marquez and Alejo Carpentier, two key authors of modern Latin America. NOTE: Taught by professor Tom Winterbottom.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ILAC 272: New Brazilian Cinema

This course studies cinema from Brazil with a focus on films from the last decade. We will consider how to effectively talk and write about film, particularly according to Brazil's specific historical and cultural context and from a perspective of social realism. Numerous readings and discussions will bolster our viewings of fiction films and documentaries. Directors include Kleber Mendonça Filho, Anna Muylaert, Gabriel Mascaro, Karim Aïnouz, Aly Muritiba, and Petra Costa. Taught in English; films shown with English subtitles.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ILAC 277: Senior Seminar: Spanish and Society - From Novel to Film

Open to seniors in ILAC and Spanish; juniors by permission of instructor. All students must contact instructor to obtain an enrollment code. How are film and novels alike? How are they different? Can the study of cinematographic adaptation of novels help us understand better the specific nature of literature and that of film? What does it mean to be 'faithful' to a work of literature in a new medium? To address these questions, the course combines a selection of major Latin American novels and plays, as well as a panorama of Latin American cinematography, from 1960s's films to contemporary productions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 278A: Senior Seminar: Self-Writing in Latin America

Open to seniors in ILAC and Spanish; juniors by permission of instructor. Why is self-narrative a daring form for the feminine voice? How does writing the self affect notions of identity? The course examines self-writing across different formats: diaries, memoirs, fiction and comics. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 5 units and a letter grade to be eligible for WIM credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 281E: Peripheral Dreams: The Art and Literature of Miró, Dalí, and other Surrealists in Catalonia (ARTHIST 221E)

Why was Salvador Dalí fascinated with the architecture of Gaudí? Why did André Breton, Paul Éluard and Federico García Lorca visit Barcelona? Moreover, why did Catalonia become such an important cradle for Surrealism? Why is the (Catalan) landscape such a relevant presence in the work of Miró and Dalí? Through a critical analysis and discussion of selected works of art and literature, this seminar focuses and follows the trajectories of Miró and Dalí, from Barcelona to Paris to New York, and explores the role of their Catalan background as a potentially essential factor in their own contributions to Surrealism and the reception of their work. The course will provide the materials and guide the student to conduct research on a specific work(s) of art, architecture, literature or cinema either by Miró, Dalí or one of his peers in relation to their cultural, social and political context. The course is intended for graduate students in Iberian and Comparative Literature, Art History, Cultural Studies, and related fields. Taught in English by Jordi Falgàs i Casanovas.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ILAC 283E: Visuality, Memory and Citizenship: Archive and Activism in Catalan Photography (ARTHIST 283E)

An examination of the ethics, poetics and politics of visual representation in a selection of photographers and artists from Catalonia: images of the Spanish Civil War by Agustí Centelles, snapshots of urban life by Joan Colom, the use of photography as memorial or critical tool by Francesc Torres and Joan Fontcuberta¿s creative and theoretical contributions to post-photography in the digital age, among others. The wide range of practices discussed encompass documentary photography, photojournalism and the relation between photography and contemporary art. These Catalan photographers and artists will be studied in an international context, in connection with the work of Robert Capa, Gerda Taro, Gilles Peress, Gervasio Sánchez, Susan Meiselas, Marcelo Brodsky, Sophie Ristelhueber, Alfredo Jaar, Gustavo Germano and Martin Parr. The main focus will be on how photography serves both as a repository of memory and as an instrument of political intervention. Offered in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Monegal, A. (PI)

ILAC 299: Individual Work

Open to department advanced undergraduates or graduate students by consent of professor. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

ILAC 303: Topics of: Early Modern Theories of History

From the 15th to the 17th centuries, European expansion projects, especially the Iberian ones, prompted new constructions of the past, present, and future. This proliferation of history writing was complicated by the fact that the various populations of the global Iberian monarchies, particularly those of New Spain, Peru, and Brazil, did not share the same concepts of historicity or temporality. In this course, students will explore a great diversity of primary sources (chronicles, reports, annals, pictographic codices, theater, paintings, feather mosaics, murals, etc.) and discover the unexpected social memories and theories of history that they created.
Last offered: Spring 2019
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