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21 - 30 of 64 results for: ILAC

ILAC 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ILAC 193: The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar

Pedro Almodóvar is one of the most recognizable auteur directors in the world today. His films express a hybrid and eclectic visual style and the blurring of frontiers between mass and high culture. Special attention is paid to questions of sexuality and the centering of usually marginalized characters. This course studies Pedro Almodóvar's development from his directorial debut to the present, from the "shocking" value of the early films to the award-winning mastery of the later ones. Prerequisite: ability to understand spoken Spanish. Readings in English. Midterm and final paper can be in English. Majors should write in Spanish.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 199: Individual Work

Open only to students in the department, or by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

ILAC 200E: War and the Modern Novel

From the turn of the 19th century to well into the 20th century, novelists developed the theme of alienation and the decline of civilization. Along with the fall of centuries-old empires, World War I brought about the collapse of traditional European values and the dissociation of the subject. The aestheticizing of violence and the ensuing insecurity inaugurated the society of totally administered life, based on universal suspicion and pervasive guilt. The seminar will study narrative responses to these developments in some of the foremost authors of the 20th century from several European literatures: Knut Hamsun, Joseph Roth, Ernst Jünger, Virginia Woolf, Franz Kafka, Curzio Malaparte, Thomas Mann, Mercè Rodoreda, Antonio Lobo Antunes, and Jaume Cabré. Taught in English.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ILAC 211: Existentialism, from Moral Quest to Novelistic Form (COMPLIT 258A)

This seminar intends to follow the development of Existentialism from its genesis to its literary expressions in the European postwar. The notions of defining commitment, of moral ambiguity, the project of the self, and the critique of humanism will be studied in selected texts by Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Unamuno, Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Joan Sales.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER
Instructors: Resina, J. (PI)

ILAC 213: The Memory of the Eye: Iberian Cinema from Buñuel to Almodóvar

An introduction to Spanish, Portuguese, Basque, and Catalan cinema through films from the 1920s and 30s to the present. How film uses a visual grammar of the image to tackle social questions and construct a collective memory. This course will consider the problems of individual recollection under conditions of collective trauma and distortion of the past, exploring the relation between film and history. The course will also focus on how images can be used to explore subjectivity and the passions. We will be watching outstanding films by Luis Buñuel, Carlos Saura, Víctor Erice, Bigas Luna, Pedro Almodóvar, Miguel Gomes, Julio Medem, Ventura Pons, Iciar Bollaín, and Isabel Coixet. Students will be responsible for watching all the films, engaging in lively discussion, in preparation for which, they will be asked to consider certain issues in writing before each class. Each student will present on one of the films for about fifteen minutes. There will be one short midterm essay and one final paper "on a different film."
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Resina, J. (PI)

ILAC 217: Fernando Pessoa: Aesthetics as Ontology

The poetry and prose of Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935), Portugal's greatest modern poet. As famous for his written work as for his complex understanding of selfhood, Pessoa remains a towering and largely perplexing figure even today. Class discussions will focus on close readings of Pessoa's work along with the implications of his theory of subjectivity for our understanding of modernity, aesthetics, and the self. Taught in English. Readings in Portuguese and English.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ILAC 220E: Renaissance Africa (AFRICAST 220E, COMPLIT 220, ILAC 320E)

Literature and Portuguese expansion into Africa during the sixteenth century. Emphasis on forms of exchange between Portuguese and Africans in Morocco, Angola/Congo, South Africa, the Swahili Coast, and Ethiopia. Readings in Portuguese and English. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 227: The Making of Modern Brazil

This course explores vital moments in Brazil after its republican revolution of 1889 until the present. Through a cultural lens, we will study moments in Brazil's various impulses for "progress" and "modernity." Through various authors, films, artworks, and manifestos from Brazil's biggest cities to the backlands and to the Amazon, we seek to imagine contemporary Brazil from a deep understanding of its cultural and historical context. Specific areas of focus include the Modern Art Week of 1922 in Sao Paulo, the construction of Brasilia, and the rise (and fall) of Brazil in the 2010s. Taught in English, with readings available in English and Portuguese and an option for students to complete assignments in Portuguese if desired.
Last offered: Winter 2019
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