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1 - 3 of 3 results for: HUMBIO29

HUMBIO 29: Introduction to Global Health

The class is an introduction to the field of global health. It focuses on resource-poor areas of the world and explores how human health is affected by poverty, international policy, planetary health, economic development, human rights, and power imbalances. We will examine global health from broad perspectives: historical, cultural, political, demographic, economic and biomedical. The course is intended for students interested in human health, international relations, and technical and social strategies to improve health worldwide. Students will have opportunities for in-depth discussion, presentations, and interaction with experts in the field. Because of the breadth of material to be covered, issues presented in class will be supplemented by independent student research and selected required readings.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 29A: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177A, CSRE 177E, EDUC 177A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP

HUMBIO 29G: Gender and Intersectionality in Global Health

Intersectional thinking is increasingly being applied to global health and other academic disciplines as a framework for understanding complex, and often seemingly intractable, challenges to health and well-being. This course explores how gender (e.g. male, female, trans*, non-binary, etc) identity and relationships intersect with other social categorizations, including age and reproductive status (particularly for women), race/ethnicity, socioeconomic class, immigration status, educational attainment, to create systemic advantages or disadvantages that may explain and/or could address poor health outcomes within and across global communities. More specifically, we will focus on intersectional and biological frameworks in the context of cultural gender norms, to explore possible reasons for differences in incidence and prevalence of a wide range of health disparities worldwide. We will also use these frameworks to explore options for health improvement, in terms of both prevention and care/treatment.
Last offered: Winter 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
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