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81 - 90 of 115 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 305: Graduate Pedagogy Workshop

Required of first-year History Ph.D. students. Perspectives on pedagogy for historians: course design, lecturing, leading discussion, evaluation of student learning, use of technology in teaching lectures and seminars. Addressing today's classroom: sexual harassment issues, integrating diversity, designing syllabi to include students with disabilities.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Frank, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 305J: Wonder, Curiosity & Collecting: Building a Stanford Cabinet of Curiosities (ARTHIST 225, HISTORY 205J)

Inside every museum lies a cabinet of curiosities. Explores the history of wonder, curiosity, and collecting, with special attention to the Renaissance origins of the cabinet of curiosities and their modern afterlives. Hands-on experience working with the Stanford collection in the Cantor to create a contemporary cabinet in collaboration with artist Mark Dion. This will be a unique opportunity to create a Stanford cabinet of curiosities for the twenty-first century. All seminar participants will contribute to the published exhibit catalogue.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 305K: The Age of Revolution: America, France, and Haiti (AFRICAAM 205K, HISTORY 205K)

This course examines the "Age of Revolution," spanning the 18th and 19th centuries. Primarily, this course will focus on the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions (which overthrew both French and white planter rule). Taken together, these events reshaped definitions of citizenship, property, and government. But could republican principles-- color-blind in rhetoric-- be so in fact? Could nations be both republican and pro-slavery? Studying a wide range of primary materials, this course will explore the problem of revolution in an age of empires, globalization, and slavery.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 307J: Visual Technologies and Environmental Thinking (HISTORY 207J)

This course follows the historical development of environmental thinking from the birth of the earth sciences in the early 19th-century to the rise of green activism. We will explore how conceptions of nature (and society) changed throughout the development of technical modes of representing space and observing the earth from a distance. Particular attention will be paid to the political, military, intellectual and cultural factors that shape the way visual technologies define, visualize, and represent the natural world in the Middle East and North Africa.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Zakar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 307K: Writing History: Celebrity Deathmatch (HISTORY 207K)

What makes a book of history "popular" and what makes it "academic"? Is it possible to write rigorous scholarship that also attracts a broad readership? This class answers yes, and then sets out to consider how this might be done, comparing pairs of books written on similar topics. With its emphasis on the craft of writing and the art of public engagement, this colloquia is meant to encourage both Ph.D students and undergraduates interested in writing serious nonfiction.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Burns, J. (PI)

HISTORY 308F: Law and Humanities Workshop: History, Literature, and Philosophy

(Formerly LAW 516, now LAW 3515.) The Law and Humanities Workshop: History, Literature, and Philosophy is designed as a forum in which faculty and students from the Law School and from various humanities departments can discuss some of the best work now being done in law and humanities. Every other week, an invited speaker will present his or her current research for discussion. In the week prior to a given speaker's presentation, the class will meet as a group to discuss secondary literature relevant to understanding and critiquing the speaker's research. Students will then read the speaker's paper in advance of the following week's workshop presentation. Enrollment will be limited to 30 students-- 20 from SLS who will be selected by lottery and 10 from H&S. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, and writing assignments.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 310: The History of Occupation, 1914-2010 (HISTORY 210)

Examines the major cases of occupation in the twentieth century, from the first World War until the present, and issues of similarities, differences, and implications for contemporary policy making. Topics include European and Asian cases emerging from World War I and World War II, the Israeli occupation of the West Bank; the Soviet and American occupations of Afghanistan; and the American occupation of Iraq. Discussions will revolve around the problems, efficacy, and effects of occupation in historical perspective.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 313F: Medieval Germany, 900-1250 (GERMAN 213, GERMAN 313, HISTORY 213F)

This course will provide a survey of the most important political, historical, and cultural events and trends that took place in the German-speaking lands between 900 and 1250. Important themes include the evolution of imperial ideology and relations with Rome, expansion along the eastern frontier, the crusades, the investiture controversy, the rise of powerful cities and civic identities, monastic reform and intellectual renewal, and the flowering of vernacular literature.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 321B: The 'Woman Question' in Modern Russia (FEMGEN 221B, HISTORY 221B)

Russian radicals believed that the status of women provided the measure of freedom in a society and argued for the extension of rights to women as a basic principle of social progress. The social status and cultural representations of Russian women from the mid-19th century to the present. The arguments and actions of those who fought for women's emancipation in the 19th century, theories and policies of the Bolsheviks, and the reality of women's lives under them. How the status of women today reflects on the measure of freedom in post-Communist Russia.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 324C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 224C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
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