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51 - 60 of 115 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 221B: The 'Woman Question' in Modern Russia (FEMGEN 221B, HISTORY 321B)

Russian radicals believed that the status of women provided the measure of freedom in a society and argued for the extension of rights to women as a basic principle of social progress. The social status and cultural representations of Russian women from the mid-19th century to the present. The arguments and actions of those who fought for women's emancipation in the 19th century, theories and policies of the Bolsheviks, and the reality of women's lives under them. How the status of women today reflects on the measure of freedom in post-Communist Russia.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 224A: The Soviet Civilization (HISTORY 424A, REES 224A)

Socialist visions and practices of the organization of society and messianic politics; the Soviet understanding of mass violence, political and ethnic; and living space. Primary and secondary sources. Research paper or historiographical essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 224C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HISTORY 226E: Famine in the Modern World (HISTORY 326E, PEDS 226)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Examines the major famines of modern history, the controversies surrounding them, and the reasons that famine persists in our increasingly globalized world. Focus is on the relative importance of natural, economic, and political factors as causes of famine in the modern world. Case studies include the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s; the Bengal famine of 1943-44; the Soviet famines of 1921-22 and 1932-33; China's Great Famine of 1959-61; the Ethiopian famines of the 1970s and 80s, and the Somalia famines of the 1990s and of 2011.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HISTORY 230C: Paris: Capital of the Modern World (FRENCH 140, FRENCH 340, URBANST 184)

This course explores how Paris, between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries, became the political, cultural, and artistic capital of the modern world. It considers how the city has both shaped and been shaped by the tumultuous events of modern history- class conflict, industrialization, imperialism, war, and occupation. It will also explore why Paris became the major world destination for intellectuals, artists and writers. Sources will include films, paintings, architecture, novels, travel journals, and memoirs. Course taught in English with an optional French section.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 230G: How to Build an Empire: Race and Religion in Imperial France (FRENCH 207, FRENCH 307)

This class will explore the French Empire through race and religion, and examine its specificity vis-a-vis the history of other European empires. How do we think historically about the relationships between nation, Republic and empire? This course will draw from literary, political, philosophical and anthropological texts to introduce students to key notions and concepts debated in France and the francophone world. Readings bear on the nature of nation and citizenship, the tension between republic and empire, the dynamics of universalism and particularism, changing discourses of race, and the role of religion in the nation-state.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Marcus, E. (PI)

HISTORY 232A: Power, Art, and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy (HISTORY 332A)

Provides a fundamental understanding of the cultural and political imagination of the Italian Renaissance, with particular emphasis on Florence between 1300 and 1600 CE. Topics include political and social upheavals, radical shifts in religious practice and devotion, the commercial revolution in trade and banking, the rediscovery of classical philosophy and style, and the flowering of the literary and visual arts.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 233D: Borders and Migration in the British Empire, 1750-2000 (HISTORY 333D)

This course traces the history of borders, migration, and belonging in Britain's colonies and imperial spaces, from the late-18th through late-20th centuries. From colonial North America to Sydney to Cape Town, from the British Caribbean to Britain itself, we will explore the concept of "border imperialism" in which borders, movement, and regimes of belonging are both constituted through and integral to capital and empire. Readings will be drawn from primary sources as well as secondary texts.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Robinson, A. (PI)

HISTORY 234B: Grad Research Seminar: The Enlightenment, Pt. II (HISTORY 432B)

Prerequisite: Completion of HISTORY 234, 334 or 432A.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 248S: Colonial States and African Societies, Part I (HISTORY 448A)

Colonialism set in motion profound transformations of African societies. These transformations did not occur immediately following military conquest, nor did they occur uniformly throughout the continent. This research seminar will focus directly on the encounter between the colonial state and African societies. The seminar will examine problems of social transformation, the role of the colonial state, and the actions of Africans. Following four weeks of collloquim style discussion, students then embark on independent research on the encounter between one colonial state and its constituent African societies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Roberts, R. (PI)
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