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41 - 50 of 115 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 205J: Wonder, Curiosity & Collecting: Building a Stanford Cabinet of Curiosities (ARTHIST 225, HISTORY 305J)

Inside every museum lies a cabinet of curiosities. Explores the history of wonder, curiosity, and collecting, with special attention to the Renaissance origins of the cabinet of curiosities and their modern afterlives. Hands-on experience working with the Stanford collection in the Cantor to create a contemporary cabinet in collaboration with artist Mark Dion. This will be a unique opportunity to create a Stanford cabinet of curiosities for the twenty-first century. All seminar participants will contribute to the published exhibit catalogue.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 205K: The Age of Revolution: America, France, and Haiti (AFRICAAM 205K, HISTORY 305K)

This course examines the "Age of Revolution," spanning the 18th and 19th centuries. Primarily, this course will focus on the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions (which overthrew both French and white planter rule). Taken together, these events reshaped definitions of citizenship, property, and government. But could republican principles-- color-blind in rhetoric-- be so in fact? Could nations be both republican and pro-slavery? Studying a wide range of primary materials, this course will explore the problem of revolution in an age of empires, globalization, and slavery.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 206C: The Modern Battle (INTNLREL 183)

The purpose of this seminar is to examine the evolution of modern warfare by closely following four modern battles/campaigns. For this purpose the seminar offers four mock staff rides, facilitating highly engaged, well-researched experience for participants. In a mock staff ride, students are assigned roles; each student is playing a general or staff officer who was involved in the battle/campaign. Students will research their roles and, during the staff ride, will be required to explain "their" decisions and actions. Staff rides will not deviate from historical records, but closely examine how decisions were made, what pressures and forces were in action, battle outcomes, etc. This in-depth examination will allow students to gain a deeper understanding of how modern tactics, technology, means of communications, and the scale of warfare can decide, and indeed decided, campaigns. We will will spend two weeks preparing for and playing each staff ride. One meeting will be dedicated to dis more »
The purpose of this seminar is to examine the evolution of modern warfare by closely following four modern battles/campaigns. For this purpose the seminar offers four mock staff rides, facilitating highly engaged, well-researched experience for participants. In a mock staff ride, students are assigned roles; each student is playing a general or staff officer who was involved in the battle/campaign. Students will research their roles and, during the staff ride, will be required to explain "their" decisions and actions. Staff rides will not deviate from historical records, but closely examine how decisions were made, what pressures and forces were in action, battle outcomes, etc. This in-depth examination will allow students to gain a deeper understanding of how modern tactics, technology, means of communications, and the scale of warfare can decide, and indeed decided, campaigns. We will will spend two weeks preparing for and playing each staff ride. One meeting will be dedicated to discussing the forces shaping the chosen battle/campaign: the identity and goals ofnthe belligerents, the economic, technological, cultural and other factors involved, as well as the initial general plan. The second meeting will be dedicated to the battle itself. The four battles will illustrate major developments in modern warfare.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 206E: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to major capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 207J: Visual Technologies and Environmental Thinking (HISTORY 307J)

This course follows the historical development of environmental thinking from the birth of the earth sciences in the early 19th-century to the rise of green activism. We will explore how conceptions of nature (and society) changed throughout the development of technical modes of representing space and observing the earth from a distance. Particular attention will be paid to the political, military, intellectual and cultural factors that shape the way visual technologies define, visualize, and represent the natural world in the Middle East and North Africa.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Zakar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 207K: Writing History: Celebrity Deathmatch (HISTORY 307K)

What makes a book of history "popular" and what makes it "academic"? Is it possible to write rigorous scholarship that also attracts a broad readership? This class answers yes, and then sets out to consider how this might be done, comparing pairs of books written on similar topics. With its emphasis on the craft of writing and the art of public engagement, this colloquia is meant to encourage both Ph.D students and undergraduates interested in writing serious nonfiction.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Burns, J. (PI)

HISTORY 208J: Where Do Highways Come From? The History of Infrastructure

Roads, walls, and server farms are often taken for granted in our daily lives. In fact, a common statement about infrastructure is that it goes unnoticed until it fails. So what role does it play in shaping human behavior? What can we learn from understanding its origins and demise? From roadside taverns to biometric identification, this introduction to infrastructure studies explores early modern examples side-by-side with twenty-first century global ones.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 209S: Research Seminar for Majors

Required of History majors. How to conduct original, historical research and analysis, including methods such as using the libraries and archives at Stanford and elsewhere, and working collaboratively to frame topics, identify sources, and develop analyses. Autumn quarter focuses on American Political History and Comparative Colonialism; Winter quarter on Europe before 1500; Spring quarter on Gender/Race/Sexuality in U.S. History, Early Modern Travel Accounts, and Law, Society, and the Supernatural in Early Modern Europe.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 210: The History of Occupation, 1914-2010 (HISTORY 310)

Examines the major cases of occupation in the twentieth century, from the first World War until the present, and issues of similarities, differences, and implications for contemporary policy making. Topics include European and Asian cases emerging from World War I and World War II, the Israeli occupation of the West Bank; the Soviet and American occupations of Afghanistan; and the American occupation of Iraq. Discussions will revolve around the problems, efficacy, and effects of occupation in historical perspective.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 213F: Medieval Germany, 900-1250 (GERMAN 213, GERMAN 313, HISTORY 313F)

This course will provide a survey of the most important political, historical, and cultural events and trends that took place in the German-speaking lands between 900 and 1250. Important themes include the evolution of imperial ideology and relations with Rome, expansion along the eastern frontier, the crusades, the investiture controversy, the rise of powerful cities and civic identities, monastic reform and intellectual renewal, and the flowering of vernacular literature.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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